Biography and History

The Council on Foreign Relations is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research and national membership organization dedicated to improving understanding of international affairs by promoting a range of ideas and opinions on United States foreign policy. The Council has had a significant impact in the development of twentieth century United States foreign policy. Its membership has historically been drawn from those in business, government and academia recognized as the nation’s opinion leaders in international relations; membership is by invitation only. The Council’s basic constituency is its members, but it also reaches out to a wider audience through its publications, Committees on Foreign Relations, Corporate Program, and media efforts, contributing to the national dialogue on foreign policy.

The Council has no affiliation with the United States government. Its budget is funded through members’ dues, voluntary gifts, income from publications, endowment income, foundation grants, and subscriptions by corporate subscribers to the Corporate Program. The Council does not perform contract research and receives no budgetary support from the United States or any other government.

The Council on Foreign Relations was founded in 1921 to provide a continuous conference on international questions affecting the United States and to create and stimulate foreign policy debates within the United States. From an original 200 members, the Council had grown to over 3000 by 2005. To fulfill its mission, the Council established and developed a "think tank," as well as programs for corporations and affiliated Committees around the country. It has also expanded publications and media efforts beyond Foreign Affairs, its flagship journal.

The origins of the Council date to the end of World War I, when some of the American participants at the Paris Peace Conference wanted the United States to be better prepared to deal with international policy situations, such as the Treaty of Versailles. Believing that the United States would need to play a larger role in world affairs, they sought to create an organization that would provide for the continuous study of international problems facing the United States. These men, along with some British counterparts, founded the "Institute of International Affairs" in Paris in 1919. In 1921, the American branch of this Institute (no longer directly affiliated with the British section) merged with a larger existing group of New York City business and professional men to form the Council on Foreign Relations as a privately funded, non-profit and non-partisan organization. This formation was also a reaction against what the founders considered the shortsighted rejection of the League of Nations by the United States and the effort of the country to withdraw from involvement in international affairs.

To fulfill its original mission, the Council developed three principal activities: meetings, a program of studies, and publications. The Council leadership organized general meetings (dinner followed by a formal address) and evening discussions (which were more technical in nature and focused on a special subject with limited participation). Speakers included Herbert Hoover, Charles Evans Hughes, Cordell Hull, Nelson Rockefeller, George Kennan, Anthony Eden, Jawaharlal Nehru, Georges Clemenceau, and many other American and foreign diplomats, journalists, scholars, and military leaders. Study groups were organized for detailed examination of a particular problem or issue, the research of which sometimes lead to high quality publications. The Council provided a focal point, bringing together different backgrounds and expertise to examine pertinent issues. Topics such as disarmament, dictatorship, the Depression, international trade, finance, and investment are examples of the varied research the study groups have undertaken.

The early Council also developed an integrated publication program, including a quarterly review devoted to consideration of American foreign issues. This independently edited journal, Foreign Affairs, was established in the summer of 1922. It was initially edited by Archibald Cary Coolidge with assistance from Hamilton Fish Armstrong who succeeded Coolidge upon his death in 1928. Contributions to Foreign Affairs have come from leading statesmen, economists, publicists, and scholars of all nationalities and representing a wide range of viewpoints. Other publication initiatives included an annual Survey of American Foreign Relations, an annual Political Handbook of the World, and occasional volumes on current international problems, including the reports of Council study groups and reference works. The Council was concerned about the privacy of its members, and from the beginning determined not to publish its proceedings.

The Council began a reference and information service in 1931, gathering information bearing on American foreign relations, maintaining a clipping file, and answering reference questions. The Council’s Library collected indispensable volumes and documents on political, economic, and legal aspects of international affairs beginning in 1918, as well as historical and background materials.

In the late 1920s, the Council began collaboration with other institutions in study and research at meetings such as the International Studies Conference. The Council maintained close ties with the Royal Institute of International Affairs in London and began relationships with French and Canadian foreign affairs groups. Along with the collaborative international conference, the Council sponsored many other activities that could fall under the broad heading of "conferences," including Conferences for University Men, on the topics of neutrality and American foreign economic policy, Seminars for Junior Executives (a forerunner of the Corporate Program), and conferences on teaching and research in international relations. As early as the 1920s, members of the Council who were directors of large corporations had their firms signed up for a program of corporate financial support. From 1939-1941 the Council held "Seminars for Business Executives," which were suspended due to World War II. Restarted in 1953, this program was dubbed the Corporate Program and continues to the present time, providing seminars and trips for corporate members.

Assisted by a grant from the Carnegie Corporation, the Council began to organize a number of discussion groups in cities throughout the country in 1938, for the purpose of stimulating greater interest in foreign affairs on the part of community leaders in widely separated areas. These "Committees on Foreign Relations" were established and guided by the Council as small groups of community leaders with diverse opinions, and remained relatively autonomous from the Council. An annual conference allowed members of the different Committees to meet and exchange experiences. The Committees on Foreign Relations were indicators of public opinion throughout the country.

In the interwar years, the Council’s studies and meetings focused on a variety of topics including labor, Latin America, and Africa. In the summer of 1939, the Council suggested to the United States Department of State that it might undertake research work into certain topics related to the war in Europe. The Council proposed that it form groups of experts to proceed with research under four general heads – Security and Armament Problems, Economic and Financial Problems, Political Problems, Territorial Problems, and later, Peace Aims. These groups, situated under the Council’s Studies Department, formed what have come to be known as the War and Peace Studies and were funded by the Rockefeller Foundation. This was a major effort to help prepare the United States to deal with the problems of the post war world better than it had coped with the issues after the First World War. These confidential studies led to Council members’ participation in other work related to the organization of peace and the settlement of postwar problems after World War II. This was the first of many "projects," study groups of a longer duration and larger scope than usual.

After World War II, studies at the Council on Foreign Relations focused on U.S. and Soviet relations, economic aid to Europe, the Korean War, China, and Indochina, as well as nuclear weaponry and eventually Vietnam. In the 1960s, the Council began two fellowship programs: military fellows in 1962, and International Affairs Fellowship Program in 1967, financed by the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, which encouraged young scholars to participate at the Council. Also in the 1960s, a discussion about the inclusion of women as members began to take substance. The membership remained uncomfortable with this issue for the duration of that decade, but by 1971 eighteen women had been invited to join the Council.

In 1972, the Council took a controversial step when it opened an office in Washington to supplement the established membership and research facilities in New York. This "modest outpost" evolved into a full program of meetings and fellows for the growing number of Washington-based members, including representatives from both the executive and legislative branches of government. By the mid-1990s, more than two-thirds of Council members lived and worked beyond a 50-mile radius of New York. Washington and Boston retained the largest share, but a significant increase in membership had taken place on the West Coast, in the Midwest, and in such southern cities as Dallas and Atlanta. The late 1970s saw a major effort at long-term national outreach through regional membership meetings and ever more frequent travel by Council officers and fellows. The Council continued these experiments during the 1980s, promoting the occasional opening of Council meetings to public television coverage, and in the 1990s by establishing regular programs for members throughout the country and staging hearings and debates for television.

In the mid-1970s, the Council began work on a comprehensive study focusing on major international problems that would confront the world in the next decade. The 1980s Project looked at the control of nuclear weapons, human rights, international monetary relations, energy and the environment, armed conflict, terrorism and subversion, industrial policy, and relations between developed and less-developed states. The results were published in a series of reports.

In the 1990s, the Council focused its efforts on nurturing the next generation of foreign policy leaders, expanding its outreach through national programs and the regular use of television for hearings and debates on major policy issues, and enlarging the Studies Program division with two stated purposes: figuring out the rules and rhythms of foreign policy and developing new ideas for America and the international community.

In terms of physical location, the Council initially occupied two rooms on West 43rd Street in New York City until 1930, when the organization moved into the "Council House" at 45 East 46th Street. By the early 1940s, the Council had again outgrown its location; Mrs. Harold I. Pratt donated her home at the corner of 68th Street and Park Avenue, and the Council was officially located at the Pratt House in April 1945. A new wing was constructed in 1954, and two adjacent buildings were purchased in 1979-1980. The buildings were renovated in 1983-1984. The Council purchased another neighboring building on 68th Street in 1997, creating a state of the art meeting room and study offices known as the Peterson Center for International Studies.

For a fuller history on the Council on Foreign Relations, see Peter Grose’s Continuing the Inquiry: The Council on Foreign Relations from 1921-1996, located at http://www.cfr.org/about/history/cfr/ and Michael Wala’s The Council on Foreign Relations and American Foreign Policy in the Early Cold War (Providence: Berghahn Books, 1994).

The Board of Directors of the Council on Foreign Relations has been the Council's main steering body from its beginning in 1921. The Board is currently led by a Chairman, two vice Chairmen, and the President of the Council, and includes many other Council members.

The Administration of the Council on Foreign relations is based around its Executive Office. While the Board steers the general direction of the Council, the Administration directs day-to-day functions and contact with members. The president of the Council oversees the daily operations of the Council such as meetings and studies programs, publications, membership, and Council-affiliated committees, but is also responsible for strategic planning and institutional policy, formed in consultation with the board of directors.

The Library of the Council on Foreign Relations dates from about 1929, the year the Council opened its own building. At this time, Council leadership decided that a well organized and cataloged library and librarian were necessary to support the study which the Council hoped to undertake. Initially, the library was only open to staff and members of the Council, but eventually opened up to other libraries, organizations and students of foreign relations. For a brief period beginning in 1966 the library was organized as a new and separate organization known as the Foreign Affairs Library; it was still affiliated with the Council. The Foreign Affairs Library dissolved in 1972. The Council maintained the entirety of its archives on site until the transfer of non-current records to Princeton in 1998.

Council trips were organized for the enrichment of contributors and usually fell into one of three categories: Military trips, Studies sponsored trips, or trips planned with outside organizations.

The Studies Department spearheads the Council on Foreign Relation's efforts to promote informed discussion on issues shaping the international agenda and defines the Council's function as a foreign policy research organization. This "think tank" has played a vital role in the Council since its incorporation in the 1920s. The department includes a large number of scholars and research associates who engage each other, Council members, and non-affiliated individuals in research on topics and regions related to United States foreign policy, which historically have included topics such as international trade, arms control, and economic development, and regions such as the former Soviet Union, the Middle East, and Latin America, to name a few. The Studies program produces articles, books, policy reports and papers to disseminate the research undertaken by staff and members.

The Meetings of the Council on Foreign Relations have also been a means of furthering its goals to promote understanding of foreign affairs and the United States’ role in the world. At these meetings, government officials, global leaders, and Council members discuss and debate major foreign-policy issues.

Conferences of the Council on Foreign Relations, designed to further promote understanding of the United States and foreign affairs, generally focused on relations between the United States and one other country or region in particular, and were held either in the United States or the country under examination. The Council had no clear cut policy about conferences from its inception through the 1950s, and the term was used to cover several different kinds of activities.

The Corporate Program is a facet of the Council that targets business executives of companies who have international connections. The Corporate Program organizes programs for individual members and executives of member companies, providing them with opportunities to address critical issues in international business and finance. From 1939-1941 the Council held "Seminars for Business Executives," which were suspended due to World War II. The idea resurfaced in 1952, and the Corporate Program formally dates to 1953 when the Council began offering spring and fall seminars. Seminar types include Business Executive Seminars and Corporate Service Seminars (the title change dated to around 1969); after 1981, the Corporate Program events grew to include meetings, conferences, breakfasts, luncheons, dinners, and trips along with the original seminars.

The Committees on Foreign Relations, an initiative launched by the Council in December 1937, were autonomous and self-governing groups replicating the New York Council, serving for the education of the members in different communities. The Council cooperated closely with the committees in supplying speakers, including members of the Council’s own staff. Delegates from the Committees attended an annual conference at the Council’s headquarters in New York. In 1995, the Committees formed their own association, the American Committees on Foreign Relations, headquartered in Washington, D.C. and comprised of 33 local affiliates. For more information on the American Committees on Foreign Relations, see their website at http://www.acfr.org/.

The Council formed its "National Program" department in the early 1990s to engage members outside New York and Washington in a substantive debate on international affairs and United States foreign policy through events held in key cities across the country. While initially intended to strengthen the Committees, it took over their role at the Council when they became a separate organization.

Since its inception, the Council on Foreign Relations has used its program of publication to further its goal to stimulate international thought among the people of the United States. After the journal Foreign Affairs was launched, the Council’s board of directors began an integrated publications program based on extended research. The Publications Department produced annual books, as well as occasional volumes on current international problems, and the Council’s Annual Report.

The In 1922, the Council on Foreign Relations began publishing a journal on international affairs and foreign policy, Foreign Affairs. The purpose of this flagship journal was to provide new ideas, analysis, and debate on many significant world issues to a wider audience than could attend the Council’s meetings. The journal brings together divergent viewpoints on issues of policy, economics and trade. Authors include many secretaries of state, presidents, scholars, and foreign diplomats. Foreign Affairs was initially edited by Archibald Cary Coolidge and Hamilton Fish Armstrong. Later editors include William Bundy, William Hyland, and James Hoge. Though working with an Editorial Advisory Board, the journal does not use outside referees. For a history of Foreign Affairs, please see http://www.foreignaffairs.org/about/history.

In the mid-1970s, the Council on Foreign Relations opened an office in Washington, D.C. to supplement the established membership and research facility in New York City. The Washington Program is a special section of the Council on Foreign Relations whose goal is to inform Council members, Congress, the administration, the media, and the business community by engaging them in discussions and meetings with Council staff and other experts.

The Communications Department of the Council on Foreign Relations was formed to bring attention to the Council’s work and the expertise of its fellows. The Communications Department is the publicity arm of the Council, attempting to make the Council’s work relevant and useful to the public.

Source: From the finding aid for MC104

Biography and History

The Council on Foreign Relations (the Council) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research and national membership organization dedicated to promoting improved understanding of international affairs and to contributing ideas to United States foreign policy. The Council has had a large impact in the development of twentieth century United States foreign policy. Its membership has historically been drawn from those in business, government and academia recognized as the nation’s opinion leaders in international relations; membership is by invitation only. The Council’s basic constituency is its members, but it also reaches out to a wider audience through its publications, Committees on Foreign Relations, Corporate Program, and media efforts, so as to contribute to the national dialogue on foreign policy.

The Meetings of the Council on Foreign Relations have also been a means of furthering its goals to promote understanding of foreign affairs and the United States’ role in the world. At these meetings, government officials, global leaders, and Council members discuss and debate major foreign-policy issues.

For a fuller history on the Council on Foreign Relations, see the finding aid for the Council on Foreign Relations Records, Peter Grose’s Continuing the Inquiry: The Council on Foreign Relations from 1921-1996, located at http://www.cfr.org/about/history/cfr/ and Michael Wala’s The Council on Foreign Relations and American Foreign Policy in the Early Cold War (Providence: Berghahn Books, 1994).

Source: From the finding aid for MC104.13

Biography and History

The Council on Foreign Relations (the Council) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research and national membership organization dedicated to promoting improved understanding of international affairs and to contributing ideas to United States foreign policy. The Council has had a large impact in the development of twentieth century United States foreign policy. Its membership has historically been drawn from those in business, government and academia recognized as the nation’s opinion leaders in international relations; membership is by invitation only. The Council’s basic constituency is its members, but it also reaches out to a wider audience through its publications, Committees on Foreign Relations, Corporate Program, and media efforts, so as to contribute to the national dialogue on foreign policy.

The Studies Department spearheads the Council on Foreign Relation's efforts to promote informed discussion on issues shaping the international agenda and defines the Council's function as a foreign policy research organization. This "think tank" has played a vital role in the Council since its incorporation in the 1920s. The department includes a large number of scholars and research associates who engage each other, Council members, and non-affiliated individuals in research on topics and regions related to United States foreign policy, which historically have included topics such as international trade, arms control, and economic development, and regions such as the former Soviet Union, the Middle East, and Latin America, to name a few. The Studies program produces articles, books, policy reports and papers to disseminate the research undertaken by staff and members.

For a fuller history on the Council on Foreign Relations, see the finding aid for the Council on Foreign Relations Records located at http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/gb19f5814, Peter Grose’s Continuing the Inquiry: The Council on Foreign Relations from 1921-1996, located at http://www.cfr.org/about/history/cfr/ and Michael Wala’s The Council on Foreign Relations and American Foreign Policy in the Early Cold War (Providence: Berghahn Books, 1994).

Source: From the finding aid for MC104.3

Biography and History

The Council on Foreign Relations (the Council) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research and national membership organization dedicated to promoting improved understanding of international affairs and to contributing ideas to United States foreign policy. The Council has had a large impact in the development of twentieth century United States foreign policy. Its membership has historically been drawn from those in business, government and academia recognized as the nation’s opinion leaders in international relations; membership is by invitation only. The Council’s basic constituency is its members, but it also reaches out to a wider audience through its publications, Committees on Foreign Relations, Corporate Program, and media efforts, so as to contribute to the national dialogue on foreign policy.

The Meetings of the Council on Foreign Relations have also been a means of furthering its goals to promote understanding of foreign affairs and the United States’ role in the world. At these meetings, government officials, global leaders, and Council members discuss and debate major foreign-policy issues.

For a fuller history on the Council on Foreign Relations, see the finding aid for the Council on Foreign Relations Records located at http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/gb19f5814, Peter Grose’s Continuing the Inquiry: The Council on Foreign Relations from 1921-1996, located at http://www.cfr.org/about/history/cfr/ and Michael Wala’s The Council on Foreign Relations and American Foreign Policy in the Early Cold War (Providence: Berghahn Books, 1994).

Source: From the finding aid for MC104.4

  • Hamilton Fish Armstrong Papers. 1893-1973 (inclusive), 1916-1973 (bulk).

    Call Number: MC002

    The Hamilton Fish Armstrong Papers consist of correspondence, notebooks, memoranda, material from 1945 United Nations Conference on International Organization, writings especially in relation to Peace and Counterpeace and Tito and Goliath, diaries, scrapbooks, and photographs. The papers document Armstrong's career as editor of Foreign Affairs, his participation in the activities of the Council on Foreign Relations, and his professional involvement and interest in foreign policy from World War I through the 1970s. Included is correspondence with many well known political and literary figures of the time period. Some materials of a personal nature are included but the bulk of the papers relates to Armstrong's professional life. The papers also document Armstrong's participation in many philanthropic activities associated with Yugoslavia.

  • Arthur Bullard Papers. 1905-1929 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC008

    The Papers of Arthur Bullard (1879-1929), journalist and statesman, chronicle the major world political and economic events relating to World War I and its aftermath. Although the bulk of the material concerns Russia and Western Europe, there are writings on political events in North Africa, Central America, and East Asia as well. The collection includes copies and originals of newspaper and magazine articles, manuscripts of several novels, travel books, and political volumes, memorandum, and correspondence, most of which was written by Bullard. There is also a file of photographs and post cards.

  • John Foster Dulles Oral History Collection »

    Brundage, Percival F. (1892-1979) - Director, Bureau of the Budget. 1966.

    Call Number: 31

  • John Foster Dulles Oral History Collection »

    Franklin, George S., Jr. (1913-1996) - Executive Director, Council on Foreign Relations. 1965.

    Call Number: 90

  • John Foster Dulles Oral History Collection »

    McCloy, John J. (1895-1989) - High Commissioner for Germany. 1965.

    Call Number: 169

  • John Foster Dulles Oral History Collection »

    Wriston, Henry M. (1889-1978) - Chairman of the Committee on Organization and Administration of the State Department, 1953. 1964.

    Call Number: 278

  • Allen W. Dulles Papers. 1845-1971 (inclusive), 1918-1969 (bulk).

    Call Number: MC019

    The Allen W. Dulles Papers contains correspondence, speeches, writings, and photographs documenting the life of this lawyer, diplomat, businessman, and spy. One of the longest-serving directors of the Central Intelligence Agency (1953-1961), he also served in a key intelligence post in Bern, Switzerland during World War II, as well as on the Warren Commission.

  • George W. Ball Papers. 1880s-1994 (inclusive), 1933-1994 (bulk).

    Call Number: MC031

    The George W. Ball papers document Ball's career as a lawyer, diplomat, investment banker and author. His involvement in Democratic politics, including his time spent on the presidential campaigns of Adlai Stevenson and his service as undersecretary of state for John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson is well documented, as is his often overlooked role with Jean Monnet in European integration.

  • George F. Kennan Papers. 1861-2014 (inclusive), 1950-2000 (bulk).

    Call Number: MC076

    George F. Kennan (1904-2005) was a diplomat and a historian, noted especially for his influence on United States policy towards the Soviet Union during the Cold War and for his scholarly expertise in the areas of Russian history and foreign policy. Kennan's papers document his career as a scholar at the Institute for Advanced Study and his time in the Foreign Service, and include his correspondence files, published and unpublished writings, and personal files.

  • David A. Morse Papers. 1895-2003 (inclusive), 1942-1990 (bulk).

    Call Number: MC097

    The David A. Morse Papers document the life and times of David Abner Morse (1907-1990), American lawyer, soldier, and public official. While he distinguished himself in legal, military, and governmental circles, the most fruitful years of his life were spent at the helm of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the oldest member of the United Nations' family of specialized agencies. As Director-General of the International Labour Office in Geneva from 1948 to 1970, Morse guided the increasingly complex activities of this tripartite organization, which unites in one body the representatives of workers, governments, and employers. No one has had a longer tenure as its head, and no one has presided over such far-reaching changes in its composition and orientation. Drawing on a variety of experiences in the field of domestic and international labor, including appointments as Assistant, Under, and Acting Secretary of Labor in the Truman administration, Morse gave practical meaning in a postwar context to the ILO's underlying philosophy, namely, that "universal and lasting peace can be established only if it is based upon social justice." The pursuit of this object won for the ILO the Nobel Peace Prize in 1969. The David Morse Papers contain correspondence, reports, memoranda, photographs, and newspaper clippings that document this long, productive career.

  • Council on Foreign Relations Records. 1918-2011 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC104

    The Council on Foreign Relations is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research and national membership organization dedicated to improving understanding of international affairs by promoting a range of ideas and opinions on United States foreign policy. The Council has had a significant impact in the development of twentieth century United States foreign policy. The Records of the Council on Foreign Relations document the history of the organization from its founding in 1921 through the present. The collection includes valuable source documents and records of the meetings, group discussions and studies, and conferences of the Council, as well as portions of its administrative records.

  • Council on Foreign Relations Records. 1918-2011 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC104

    The Council on Foreign Relations is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research and national membership organization dedicated to improving understanding of international affairs by promoting a range of ideas and opinions on United States foreign policy. The Council has had a significant impact in the development of twentieth century United States foreign policy. The Records of the Council on Foreign Relations document the history of the organization from its founding in 1921 through the present. The collection includes valuable source documents and records of the meetings, group discussions and studies, and conferences of the Council, as well as portions of its administrative records.

  • Council on Foreign Relations Digital Sound Recordings. 1953-1989 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC104.13

    The Council on Foreign Relations is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research and national membership organization dedicated to promoting improved understanding of international affairs and to contributing ideas to United States foreign policy. These digital sound recordings have been transfered from original reel to reel tapes of Council meetings as part of an ongoing project. The meetings feature a range of speakers on topics relating to foreign policy, including mainly government officials and businessmen from the United States and abroad.

  • Council on Foreign Relations Digital Sound Recordings. 1953-1989 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC104.13

    The Council on Foreign Relations is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research and national membership organization dedicated to promoting improved understanding of international affairs and to contributing ideas to United States foreign policy. These digital sound recordings have been transfered from original reel to reel tapes of Council meetings as part of an ongoing project. The meetings feature a range of speakers on topics relating to foreign policy, including mainly government officials and businessmen from the United States and abroad.

  • Council on Foreign Relations Records: Studies Department Series. 1918-2004 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC104.03

    The Council on Foreign Relations is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research and national membership organization dedicated to promoting improved understanding of international affairs and to contributing ideas to United States foreign policy. The Studies Department Series documents the planning and execution of the various study groups (including discussion groups, current issue review groups, seminars, workshops and conferences) and projects.

  • Council on Foreign Relations Meetings Records. 1920-1995 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC104.04

    The Council on Foreign Relations is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research and national membership organization dedicated to promoting improved understanding of international affairs and to contributing ideas to United States foreign policy. The Meetings Series documents the work of the Council's Meetings Department, including administrative issues, such as correspondence with speakers, attendance records, and the non-attribution rule, as well as the records of the actual meetings themselves.

  • Council on Foreign Relations Meetings Records. 1920-1995 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC104.04

    The Council on Foreign Relations is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research and national membership organization dedicated to promoting improved understanding of international affairs and to contributing ideas to United States foreign policy. The Meetings Series documents the work of the Council's Meetings Department, including administrative issues, such as correspondence with speakers, attendance records, and the non-attribution rule, as well as the records of the actual meetings themselves.

  • Hugh Moore Fund Collection. 1922-1972 (inclusive), 1939-1970 (bulk).

    Call Number: MC153

    The Hugh Moore Fund Collection consists of the files that belonged to Hugh Moore relating to his strong interest in the areas of world peace and world population. Moore established The Hugh Moore Fund in 1944 as a means of funding a number of organizations relating to these interests. Some of the materials in this collection pre-date 1944; these are the papers of organizations to which Moore belonged and which The Hugh Moore Fund supported.

  • Frank W. Notestein Papers. 1930-1977 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC184

    Frank W. Notestein contributed significantly to the science of demography and to a better understanding of population problems in world affairs. The Frank W. Notestein Papers contain correspondence, speeches, and writings documenting the research, ideas, career and leadership roles of this former Princeton professor, director of the Office of Population Research, and president of the Population Council.

  • James F. Hoge Papers. 1992-2010 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC263

    The Papers of James F. Hoge, journalist, editor and foreign affairs expert, chronicle his contributions to foreign affairs issues while he was the editor of Foreign Affairs magazine from 1992-2010 and the Peter G. Peterson Chair at the Council on Foreign Relations. Hoge's intellectual contributions to foreign affairs discussions are in the form of speeches, articles, commentaries, book reviews, correspondence and interviews with contemporary experts or participants in the foreign affairs issues of the time.