Biography and History

From its modest origins as a series of lectures on architecture given in 1832, the Department of Art and Archaeology has grown by leaps and bounds to become one of the University's most distinguised academic departments, responsible for the education of students on the graduate and undergraduate level as well as the administration of the Princeton Art Museum. Though the subjects of art and architecture had periodically been taught since 1832, it was not until the arrival of Professor Allan Marquand in 1882 that they were made a consistent part of the curriculum at Princeton. As the department's first chairman, Marquand oversaw the assembly of a faculty consisting of many world-renowned scholars as well as the creation of a museum to house a collection of art for study (much of which was donated by Marquand himself). In the early 20th century Princeton University's Department of Art and Archaeology found itself at the forefront of the emerging field of Art History, largely due to Marquand's efforts. In the scholarly community the Department stood alone in its early focus on medieval and classical art, two areas of expertise for which it is still known today. Following Marquand's retirement in 1922, subsequent department chairs such as Charles Rufus Morey and Baldwin Smith carried on the expansion of the curriculum, faculty, and museum; as well as undertook new projects such as a series of archaeological digs and the Index of Christian Art.

Source: From the finding aid for AC140

  • Department of Art and Archaeology Records. 1882-1991 (inclusive), 1925-1981 (bulk).

    Call Number: AC140

    The Art and Archaeology Department is one of the University's most distinguished academic departments, responsible for the education of students on the graduate and undergraduate level as well as the administration of the Princeton Art Museum. This collection consists of the records of the Department of Art and Archaeology, which include advisory council minutes; faculty files; gift records; correspondence; recommendations; project files; course lists; historical documents; and lists of images used in classes.

  • Department of Art and Archaeology Records. 1882-1991 (inclusive), 1925-1981 (bulk).

    Call Number: AC140

    The Art and Archaeology Department is one of the University's most distinguished academic departments, responsible for the education of students on the graduate and undergraduate level as well as the administration of the Princeton Art Museum. This collection consists of the records of the Department of Art and Archaeology, which include advisory council minutes; faculty files; gift records; correspondence; recommendations; project files; course lists; historical documents; and lists of images used in classes.

  • Antioch Excavation Financial Records. 1935-1938 (inclusive).

    Call Number: AC260

    Formed in 1932, the Committee for the Excavation of Antioch and its Vicinity was chaired by Princeton University's Charles Rufus Morey and included representatives from the Louvre, the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Worcester Art Museum, the Fogg Art Museum, and Dumbarton Oaks. Consists of detailed expense vouchers from the second half of the excavation of Antioch.

  • Albert Mendeloff Papers on the Princeton Camera Club. 1937-1938 (inclusive).

    Call Number: AC329

    Albert I. Mendeloff was a member of the Princeton University class of 1938 and the undergraduate director of the Princeton Camera Club, a student organization devoted to photography. Consists of correspondence between Albert Mendelhoff and famous photographers of 1938 in regards to a potential exhibit of loaned photographs at the Art and Archaeology Department.

  • Frank Jewett Mather Papers. 1906-1948 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C0025

    Consists primarily of correspondence of the American educator, art critic, and museum director Frank Jewett Mather (1868-1953).

  • Allan Marquand Papers. 1858-1951 (inclusive), 1878-1950 (bulk).

    Call Number: C0269

    Consists of the papers of Allan Marquand, Princeton art professor, founder of the University's Department of Art and Archaeology, and first director of its Art Museum.

  • Charles Rufus Morey Papers. 1924-1945 (bulk), 1900-1954 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C0511

    American art historian Charles Rufus Morey (1877-1955) served as professor in the Department of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University from 1918-1945 and as chairman from 1924-1945. The collection includes Morey's drafts for catalogues, mainly at the Museo Sacro and Museo Cristiano; photographs; professional papers, lecture and course notes; and drafts, extracts and contents of vertical files.