Biography and History

The Office of Development is the centralized administrative unit which oversees Princeton University's many fundraising programs, including Annual Giving, the 1746 Society, Endowment Gifts, Bequests, and more. In addition to making appeals to alumni and other potential donors, the Office of Development also receives and acknowledges gifts and maintains relevant financial and donor records.

Source: From the finding aid for AC240

Biography and History

The Office of Development is the centralized administrative unit which oversees Princeton University's many fundraising programs, including Annual Giving, the 1746 Society, Endowment Gifts, Bequests, and more. In addition to making appeals to alumni and other potential donors, the Office of Development also receives and acknowledges gifts and maintains relevant financial and donor records.

The 1919 Endowment Campaign was undertaken to reestablish Princeton financially following WWI. It was the first campaign to target all current and past Princton students alike (previous campaigns had usually focused on one or more classes in particular, or had limited themselves to alumni). Although the response from Princetonians was strong, after 7 years, the campaign had approximately $500,000 in outstanding pledges, which were transferred to the Princeton Fund Campaign to clear up.

The Princeton Fund Campaign took over from the Princeton Endowment Campaign in 1926, with the initial duty of colleting on pledges made during the earlier campaign (see Daily Princetonian, Volume 51, Number 105, 13 October 1926 — "PRINCETON FUND TAKES OVER 1919 ENDOWMENT CAMPAIGN Half a Million Dollars Still Outstanding from Old Pledges Must Be Collected".) This campaign should not be confused with the later Princeton University Fund, whose records may be found in AC201, Princeton University Fund Records.

The Trustees Committee on Captial Needs was a 27-man committee of prominent alumni appointed in 1957 to "intensify Princeton's long-range drive for large chunks of capital from individual or family sources" (see Daily Princetonian, Volume 81, Number 87, 3 October 1957 — "Nassau Hall Broadens Capital Funds Search With Nation-Wide Plan"). The committee's targets were distinct from those of the Annual Giving Campaign, which pursued smaller but regular donations from Alumni.

The $53 Million Campaign was first conceived of toward the end of President Dodd's tenure at Princeton, but it was not begun until more than a year into the service of President Goheen. In 1958, the University hired a professional fundraising firm, Kirsting, Brown and Company, to design and manage the effort; the campaign's director, Harold E. Kenseth, was an employee of the firm. The campaign kicked off in 1959 and continued through 1962. See Daily Princetonian, Volume 85, 17 November 1961 — "Origins of $53 Million Drive" for more details.

Source: From the finding aid for AC244

  • Office of Development Donor Files. 1920s-1990s (inclusive).

    Call Number: AC240

    The Office of Development is the centralized administrative unit which oversees Princeton University's many fundraising programs. Consists of exclusively of closed donor files created and maintained by Princeton University's Office of Development. No other administrative records are included.

  • Office of Development Records. 1917-2015 (inclusive).

    Call Number: AC244

    The Office of Development is the centralized administrative unit which oversees Princeton University's many fundraising programs, including Annual Giving, the 1746 Society, Endowment Gifts, Bequests, and more. Consists of files of the Princeton University Office of Development pertaining to several major fundraising campaigns including the 1919 Endowment Campaign and the "53 Million Campaign".