Biography and History

American poet and critic, leader of the Imagists, Ezra Pound was also a scholar and respected translator.

Source: From the finding aid for C0301

Biography and History

Ezra Pound was an American expatriate writer. Best known for his poetry, Pound also translated Chinese, Japanese, and Provencal poetry and drama.

Source: From the finding aid for C0658

Biography and History

Ezra Pound is considered the poet most responsible for defining and promoting a modernist aesthetic in poetry. Early in the twentieth century, he opened an exchange of work and ideas between British and American writers, and was famous for the generosity with which he advanced the work of major contemporaries, such as W. B. Yeats, Robert Frost, Marianne Moore, James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, and T. S. Eliot. His own significant contributions to poetry began with his promulgation of "Imagism", a movement in poetry which derived its technique from classical Chinese and Japanese poetry, stressing clarity, precision, and economy of language. His later work, for nearly fifty years, focused on his encyclopedic epic poem The Cantos. In 1914, Pound married the artist Dorothy Shakespeare, and in 1924 he moved to Italy. During this period Pound became involved in Fascist politics and did not return to the United States until 1945, when he was arrested on charges of treason for broadcasting Fascist propaganda by radio to the United States during World War II. In 1946, he was acquitted, but declared mentally ill and committed to St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington, D.C. After continuous appeals from writers won his release from the hospital in 1958, Pound returned to Italy and settled in Venice, where he died a semi-recluse in 1972.

Source: From the finding aid for C1173

  • Louise Bogan Papers. 1936-1954 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C0109

    Consists primarily of drafts, notes, fragments and final copies of American poet Louise Bogan's critical essays on modern literature, published in prestigious American journals. There are a few poetry manuscripts and even fewer pieces of correspondence.

  • New Review Correspondence of Samuel Putnam. 1927-1933 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C0111

    Samuel Putnam (1892-1950) was an American author, translator, and editor. The collection reflects the work of Putnam during the period he lived with his family in France, emphasizing his work as editor of The New Review. Correspondents include Ezra Pound, who served as associate editor for four issues, Richard Aldington, William Aspenwall Bradley, and Ford Madox Ford, as well as over 100 other literary and artistic figures.

  • Bennett Cerf Correspondence Regarding the Ezra Pound Controversy (1946) . 1946.

    Call Number: C0133

    Consists of responses from the public to Bennet Cerf's appeal (1946) to readers of his "Trade Winds" column in the Saturday Review of Literature on the question of the exclusion of Ezra Pound's poetry from an anthology of English and American poetry being published by Random House.

  • Ezra Pound Translations of Greek Drama. 1957.

    Call Number: C0301

    Consists of typescripts, with holograph emendations, of American poet Ezra Pound's English translations of Sophocles' Electra and The Women of Trachis.

  • Ezra Pound Collection on Japanese Drama. circa 1916-1917 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C0658

    Contains five typescript translations by American poet Ezra Pound of Japanese Noh plays by Zeami Motokiyo (1363-1443), H. Monogatei, and others, and several essays and miscellaneous notes by Pound.

  • Hudson Review Archives. 1863-2016 (inclusive), 1947-2014 (bulk).

    Call Number: C1091

    Consists of the records of The Hudson Review, one of the most notable and influential American literary quarterlies of the post-World War II era. Reflecting the history of this New York City-based magazine, the bulk of material dates from 1947 to 2014. In addition, there are extensive personal and family papers of founding editor Frederick Morgan (1922-2004), who was also a published poet and translator.

  • Ezra Pound Collection. 1908-1956 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C1173

    Consists of selected correspondence, manuscripts, and documents of and about Ezra Pound, who was one of the most ambitious, influential, and innovative American poets of the modernist period.

  • Ezra Pound Collection. 1908-1956 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C1173

    Consists of selected correspondence, manuscripts, and documents of and about Ezra Pound, who was one of the most ambitious, influential, and innovative American poets of the modernist period.

  • American Civil Liberties Union Records: Subgroup 2. 1947-1995 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC001.02

    The American Civil Liberties Union Records document the activities of the Union in protecting individual rights from 1920 through 1995. The files contain materials on freedom of speech, expression, and association; due process of law; equality before the law; legal case files; and organizational records. Within these categories files reflect subject areas such as academic freedom, censorship, racial discrimination, aliens' rights, privacy concerns, labor concerns, amnesty, and government loyalty and security. The files reflect work on litigation, advocacy and public policy, and subject files on various areas of interest connected with civil liberties. Materials include correspondence, court documents, memoranda, printed matter, minutes, reports, briefs, and legal files. Also included are materials from ACLU affiliate organizations, and the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee.

  • American Civil Liberties Union Records: Subgroup 2, Organizational Matters Series. 1947-1995 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC001.02.01

    The American Civil Liberties Union Records document the activities of the Union in protecting individual rights from 1920 through 1995. The files contain materials on freedom of speech, expression, and association; due process of law; equality before the law; legal case files; and organizational records. Within these categories files reflect subject areas such as academic freedom, censorship, racial discrimination, aliens' rights, privacy concerns, labor concerns, amnesty, and government loyalty and security. The files reflect work on litigation, advocacy and public policy, and subject files on various areas of interest connected with civil liberties. Materials include correspondence, court documents, memoranda, printed matter, minutes, reports, briefs, and legal files. Also included are materials from ACLU affiliate organizations, and the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee.

  • American Civil Liberties Union Records: Subgroup 2, Project Files Series. 1947-1995 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC001.02.02

    The American Civil Liberties Union Records document the activities of the Union in protecting individual rights from 1920 through 1995. The files contain materials on freedom of speech, expression, and association; due process of law; equality before the law; legal case files; and organizational records. Within these categories files reflect subject areas such as academic freedom, censorship, racial discrimination, aliens' rights, privacy concerns, labor concerns, amnesty, and government loyalty and security. The files reflect work on litigation, advocacy and public policy, and subject files on various areas of interest connected with civil liberties. Materials include correspondence, court documents, memoranda, printed matter, minutes, reports, briefs, and legal files. Also included are materials from ACLU affiliate organizations, and the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee.

  • American Civil Liberties Union Records: Subgroup 2, Subject Files Series. 1947-1995 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC001.02.03

    The American Civil Liberties Union Records document the activities of the Union in protecting individual rights from 1920 through 1995. The files contain materials on freedom of speech, expression, and association; due process of law; equality before the law; legal case files; and organizational records. Within these categories files reflect subject areas such as academic freedom, censorship, racial discrimination, aliens' rights, privacy concerns, labor concerns, amnesty, and government loyalty and security. The files reflect work on litigation, advocacy and public policy, and subject files on various areas of interest connected with civil liberties. Materials include correspondence, court documents, memoranda, printed matter, minutes, reports, briefs, and legal files. Also included are materials from ACLU affiliate organizations, and the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee.

  • American Civil Liberties Union Records: Subgroup 2, Legal Case Files Series. 1947-1995 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC001.02.04

    The American Civil Liberties Union Records document the activities of the Union in protecting individual rights from 1920 through 1995. The files contain materials on freedom of speech, expression, and association; due process of law; equality before the law; legal case files; and organizational records. Within these categories files reflect subject areas such as academic freedom, censorship, racial discrimination, aliens' rights, privacy concerns, labor concerns, amnesty, and government loyalty and security. The files reflect work on litigation, advocacy and public policy, and subject files on various areas of interest connected with civil liberties. Materials include correspondence, court documents, memoranda, printed matter, minutes, reports, briefs, and legal files. Also included are materials from ACLU affiliate organizations, and the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee.

  • American Civil Liberties Union Records: Subgroup 2, Printed Materials Series. 1947-1995 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC001.02.05

    The American Civil Liberties Union Records document the activities of the Union in protecting individual rights from 1920 through 1995. The files contain materials on freedom of speech, expression, and association; due process of law; equality before the law; legal case files; and organizational records. Within these categories files reflect subject areas such as academic freedom, censorship, racial discrimination, aliens' rights, privacy concerns, labor concerns, amnesty, and government loyalty and security. The files reflect work on litigation, advocacy and public policy, and subject files on various areas of interest connected with civil liberties. Materials include correspondence, court documents, memoranda, printed matter, minutes, reports, briefs, and legal files. Also included are materials from ACLU affiliate organizations, and the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee.

  • American Civil Liberties Union Records: Subgroup 2, Audiovisual Materials Series. 1947-1995 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC001.02.06

    The American Civil Liberties Union Records document the activities of the Union in protecting individual rights from 1920 through 1995. The files contain materials on freedom of speech, expression, and association; due process of law; equality before the law; legal case files; and organizational records. Within these categories files reflect subject areas such as academic freedom, censorship, racial discrimination, aliens' rights, privacy concerns, labor concerns, amnesty, and government loyalty and security. The files reflect work on litigation, advocacy and public policy, and subject files on various areas of interest connected with civil liberties. Materials include correspondence, court documents, memoranda, printed matter, minutes, reports, briefs, and legal files. Also included are materials from ACLU affiliate organizations, and the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee.

  • American Civil Liberties Union Washington, D.C. Office Records. 1948-1970 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MC190

    This collection consists of the papers received and generated by the staff of the Washington, D.C. Office of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) during the 1950s and 1960s. The ACLU is a leading defender of civil liberties in the United States. Founded in 1920, it has been the recipient of sharp criticism for its willingness to defend unpopular causes and has participated in a majority of the landmark cases to come before the Supreme Court in the twentieth century. The Washington Office's primary responsibility is to monitor legislative issues. In the 1950s the office worked against abuses caused by McCarthyism, including loyalty oath requirements, powers of legislative investigating committees, and censorship of free speech and expression. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, the office focused on civil rights issues and the defense of alternative means of self expression. The Washington Office was also deeply involved with defending the civil liberties of those associated with the federal government and its agencies.