Biography and History

Julian Street (1879-1947) was an American author, journalist, enologist, gastronome.

Source: From the finding aid for C0036

Biography and History

Julian Leonard Street, American author and playwright, was born in Chicago, Ill. He moved to Manhattan, then in the 1920s to Princeton, New Jersey, where his son, Julian Street Jr., was attending Princeton University. Rita Coventry (1922) was Street's first novel, and he assisted in the final cutting and revision of the cinema version, which was directed by William de Mille. Street's short stories appeared in a number of popular magazines including The Saturday Evening Post, Harper's, and The Century. A collection of them was published under the ns2:title Cross-Sections (1923). Street admired, and was influenced by, the author Booth Tarkington, with whom he co-authored The Ohio Lady(1916), which was re-written and published as The Country Cousin(1917). He died on February 14, 1947, of a cerebral hemorrhage. The Julian Street Library, a wing of Wilcox Hall at Princeton University, is named after him.

Source: From the finding aid for C1220

Biography and History

Julian L. Street (1879-1947) was a novelist and essayist especially noted for his writing and expertise about food and wine. He was also a friend and great admirer of Theodore Roosevelt.

Julian Leonard Street was born on April 18, 1879 in Chicago, Illinois. He graduated from Ridley College, St. Catharines in Ontario, Canada. Street began his writing career with newspaper work at the New York Mail and Express in 1899, and served as the drama editor from 1900 to 1901.

Street was a novelist and essayist, best known for his writings on food and wine. He was awarded the Chevalier's Cross of the Legion of Honor from the French government for his work in popularizing knowledge of French wines and cooking through his writings. Street also wrote novels and fictional articles. His works include Abroad at Home (1914), Mysterious Japan (1921), Rita Coventry (1922), and Where Paris Dines (1929). Other works include Ship-Bored, Paris à la Carte, Sunbeams, Inc., Tides (in collaboration with his wife Ada Street), Wines, and Men, Machines and Morals. He collaborated with novelist Booth Tarkington, a close friend, on the comedy play "The Ohio Lady" in 1916 and they rewrote it as "Country Cousin" in 1921. Street also wrote an acclaimed article about John Purroy Mitchel during Mitchel's mayoralty campaign for New York City in 1917. In 1926, Street won the O. Henry Memorial Prize for his story "Mr. Bisbee's Princess," a fantasy about a jeweler who meets a princess.

Street became a great admirer and friend of Theodore Roosevelt towards the end of Roosevelt's life. They met several times while Street wrote a study of Roosevelt for Collier's weekly in August and September of 1915, which was published as "The Most Interesting American." Street continued to write articles about Roosevelt, most for Collier's, and supported Roosevelt for the presidential nomination for the Republican Party in 1916. The friendship between the men grew with their continued association, and Street and his family were invited to luncheons and other social visits with the Roosevelts several times from 1915 to 1919. Street also corresponded with Roosevelt about political issues, especially related to President Woodrow Wilson's policies regarding World War I.

Julian Street married Ada Hilt in 1900. They had two children, Julian Street, Jr. and Mrs. C. Hunt Lewis. Ada Street died in 1926, and he married Marguerite Skibeness four years later. Street died on February 19, 1947. At the time of his death, he was writing a movie script.

Source: From the finding aid for MC115

  • Julian Street Papers. 1899-1966 (inclusive), 1910-1947 (bulk).

    Call Number: C0036

    Consists of correspondence, manuscripts, photographs, and notes, both published and unpublished, of American author, journalist, enologist, and gastronome Julian Street, ranging from his early reporter and drama critic days (1900-1910) up to the page of Table Topics he was working on just before his death (1947).

  • Julian Street Collection. 1904-1967 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C1220

    Consists of selected correspondence, manuscripts, photographs, and printed material of the American author and playwright Julian Street .

  • Julian L. Street Papers on Theodore Roosevelt. 1915-1939 (inclusive), 1915-1919 (bulk).

    Call Number: MC115

    Julian L. Street (1879-1947) was a novelist and essayist especially noted for his writing and expertise about food and wine. He was also a friend and great admirer of Theodore Roosevelt. Street's papers on Theodore Roosevelt are composed of correspondence, the majority being letters from Roosevelt to Street, as well as copies of articles, clippings, and other related materials which Street collected and prepared for a book of manuscript materials documenting his association with Roosevelt.

  • Julian L. Street Papers on Theodore Roosevelt. 1915-1939 (inclusive), 1915-1919 (bulk).

    Call Number: MC115

    Julian L. Street (1879-1947) was a novelist and essayist especially noted for his writing and expertise about food and wine. He was also a friend and great admirer of Theodore Roosevelt. Street's papers on Theodore Roosevelt are composed of correspondence, the majority being letters from Roosevelt to Street, as well as copies of articles, clippings, and other related materials which Street collected and prepared for a book of manuscript materials documenting his association with Roosevelt.