Biography and History

Arnold Guyot was a Swiss-born American geologist, geographer, and educator. Born in Boudevilliers, near Neuchâtel, Switzerland, he obtained his doctoral degree at Berlin. Between 1839 and 1848 he taught physical geography and history at the Academy of Neuchâtel. In 1948 Guyot came to the United States, and in 1854 he was appointed Professor of Geology and Physical Geography at the College of New Jersey (Princeton). The following year he began what is now the Department of Geological and Geophysical Sciences and started the institution's first systematic instruction in geology. In 1856 he founded what is now the Princeton Museum of Natural History. Guyot's main activities focused on hypsometric measurements of the eastern mountains from New England to North Carolina, on meteorology, and on the reform of geographic teaching in colleges and secondary schools. Guyot was involved in the formative years of weather forecasting in the United States, and his extensive meteorological observations led to the founding of the U.S. Weather Bureau. Guyot also developed topographical maps of the Appalachian and Catskill mountains. His published works include The Earth and Man (English translation, 1849), Tables, Meteorological and Physical (1859), and Creation, or The Biblical Cosmogony in the Light of Modern Science (1884). Guyot's many texts, geographic atlases, and wall charts continued to be published long after his death. The guyot, a flat-topped volcanic peak rising from the ocean floor, is named after him.

Source: From the finding aid for C1095

  • Lecture Notes Collection. 1772-1990 (inclusive).

    Call Number: AC052

    This collection contains over 600 sets of student notes taken from lectures given by members of Princeton's faculty. They represent the broad range of courses taught at Princeton University (known as the College of New Jersey prior to 1896) and include the works of numerous famous faculty and students.

  • Department of Geological and Geophysical Sciences Records. 1880-1994 (inclusive).

    Call Number: AC139

    Established in 1904 as the Department of Geology, the Department of Geological and Geophysical Sciences (now known as the Department of Geosciences) has grown become the center for the study of Earth, atmospheric, oceanographic, and environmental sciences at Princeton. The records document the department from its 19th century origins to the recent past with departmental files, faculty files, faculty meeting minutes and visual materials.

  • Cameron Family Papers. 1850-1945 (bulk), 1805-1947 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C0355

    The Cameron Family Papers consist primarily of the correspondence and writings of former Princeton University professors Henry Clay Cameron (1827-1906) and his son, A. Guyot Cameron (1864-1947), with some correspondence relating to Henry C. Cameron's wife, Wilhelmina "Mina" Louise Cécile Chollet (1832-1908). There is also a significant amount of Cameron family photographs as well as some documents, printed matter, and ephemera relating to Princeton University. Famed Swiss-American geologist, geographer, and Princeton professor Arnold Henry Guyot (1807-1884), a relative of the Cameron family through marriage, is also represented in the collection through classroom maps, correspondence, a journal, and printed articles and lectures by and about Guyot. Most of the materials in the collection are professional in nature.

  • Arnold Guyot Collection. 1829-1928 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C1095

    Consists of selected correspondence, documents, and related material by and about Arnold Guyot, the Swiss-born American geologist, geographer, and educator whose extensive meteorological observations led to the founding of the U.S. Weather Bureau.

  • Arnold Guyot Collection. 1829-1928 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C1095

    Consists of selected correspondence, documents, and related material by and about Arnold Guyot, the Swiss-born American geologist, geographer, and educator whose extensive meteorological observations led to the founding of the U.S. Weather Bureau.