Biography and History

Booth Tarkington (1869–1946), native of Indianapolis and student at Purdue and Princeton universities (Princeton Class of 1893), was perhaps Indiana's most famous author, both as a playwright and as novelist. His best-known works were written in the first decades of the twentieth century: The Gentleman from Indiana (1899), Penrod (1910), Seventeen (1917), The Magnificent Ambersons (1918), and Alice Adams (1921). The last two won Pulitzer Prizes. In his work he showed an appreciation of the development of his native city, and an amiable understanding of the real and imagined problems of young people. He was an early member of The Dramatic Club, founded in 1889, and often wrote plays and directed and acted in its productions.

Source: From the finding aid for C0062

Biography and History

Booth Tarkington, born in Indianapolis, Indiana, attended Phillips Exeter Academy, Purdue University, and Princeton University. A novelist and dramatist, Tarkington won Pulitzer Prizes for his novels The Magnificent Ambersons and Alice Adams. Tarkington was also known for his books about adolescents, such as Penrod and Seventeen.

Source: From the finding aid for C0717

Biography and History

Booth Tarkington was an American novelist. Tarkington attended Princeton University, but failed to accumulate enough credits to graduate. However, he later received honorary degrees (A.M. and Litt. D.) from Princeton in 1899 and 1918, respectively. Tarkington is perhaps best known for his Pulitzer Prize-winning novels, The Magnificent Ambersons and Alice Adams.

Source: From the finding aid for C0891

Occupations

  • Dramatists, American -- 20th century..
  • Novelists, American -- 20th century..