Biography and History

Louis Adamic was an author deeply concerned with American immigrants and their experiences in the "melting pot." Born in Blato, Austria (now Slovenia), in 1899, Adamic emigrated to the United States as a teenager and performed odd jobs throughout the American West while he learned English. He was naturalized in 1918 and entered the United States Army during World War I. After the war, he began writing, focusing his attention on the immigrant experience in America. His first few books, Dynamite and Laughing in the Jungle, showed the darker side of life as an immigrant, while Native's Return, Grandsons, and Cradle of Life told his own story of returning to his homeland. He received a Guggenheim Fellowship and a grant-in-aid from the Rockefeller Foundation for his work in the field of immigrant studies. In 1940, Adamic became director of the Common Council for American Unity and editor of Common Ground, its quarterly magazine. During World War II, his controversial political views led him to become a target of the Communists. He died under mysterious circumstances in 1951.

Source: From the finding aid for C0246

  • Louis Adamic Papers. 1848-1951 (inclusive), 1921-1951 (bulk).

    Call Number: C0246

    Louis Adamic was an author deeply concerned with American immigrants and their experiences in the "melting pot." This collection consists of papers of Adamic, including manuscripts of his books, short stories, articles, and lectures, as well as sketches, paste-ups, and proofs of Adamic’s own journal T & T. Also included are correspondence, subject files, and works of other writers.