Biography and History

Arthur Cort Holden was a member of the Princeton University Class of 1912. He went on to earn a graduate degree in architecture from Cornell University, and joined the New York City firm of McKim, Mead, and White, later forming his own firm and advising Frank Lloyd Wright on the design of the Guggenheim Museum in 1949. In addition to working as a practicing architect, Arthur Cort Holden wrote extensively on architecture, urban planning, and a wide variety of other topics.

Source: From the finding aid for AC246

Biography and History

Arthur Cort Holden was born in New York City on November 29, 1890, the son of Edwin B. Holden and Alice Cort Holden. He entered Princeton in the fall of 1908 as a member of the Class of 1912 and graduated with a Bachelor of Literature degree. He subsequently pursued degrees at Columbia University, receiving a Bachelor of Architecture and an A.M. in Economics in 1915.

Between June 1914 and June 1917, he served as troop mechanic with the Machine Gun Troop, Squadron A, New York Cavalry, on the Texas border and was discharged as a corporal. He thereupon entered the Hull Division at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, where he had a number of assignments, including Chief of Plant Section and Special Assistant to Shop Supervisor of the Hull Division. He was discharged in February 1919.

In 1915 he became associated with the office of McKim, Mead, and White until he set up his own architectural firm on January 1, 1920. His architectural partnerships-Arthur C. Holden & Associates, Holden, McLaughlin & Associates, Holden, Egan, Wilson & Corser, Holden, Yang, Raemsch & Corser, and Holden, Yang, Raemsch, Terjesen-spanned the years from 1920 to 1977, when, at the age of 87, he described his further professional activities as those of a consultant on the financing of construction and real estate. His main architectural concern was to put architecture in the service of the ordinary man. And to that end, he associated himself with many national, state, and municipal undertakings, such as the New York City Mayor's Committee on City Planning (1934-1938) and the Coordinating Committee of the Welfare Council, and he served as the chairman of the Executive Committee of the New York Urban League. In private practice he was consulting architect to American Houses, Inc., makers of basic prefabricated houses. Of his non-housing endeavors, probably the most notable was his association with Frank Lloyd Wright during the construction of the Guggenheim Museum in New York. His architectural achievements were acknowledged in 1957, when he received the Medal of Honor from the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects.

On February 10, 1917, he married Miriam Young of Boston, with whom he had three children, Edwin Arthur, Jane (Mrs. Clay), and Richmond Young Holden. (His wife's papers can be found in the Miriam Y. Holden Collection, C0071.) In 1977, after his first wife's death, Holden married Rose M. N. Barnes.

In addition to his professional career as an architect, Holden also authored several books and pamphlets, the majority of which related to his interests in finance and architecture. He and his first wife were also avid book collectors. Princeton was the recipient of the Miriam Y. Holden Collection on the History of Women (ExHold in the Rare Books Department and the Holden Room in the general stacks) and Arthur Holden's collection of books and pamphlets related to American experiments in communal living, as well as various other books and pamphlets from their private collections.

Holden was a member of the Cosmos Club and the Grolier Club, where his father had also been a prominent member. He was additionally involved with the Christodora House and the Princeton Committee on Social Service. Prominent among Princeton alumni, Holden served as the President of the Class of 1912, was a long-standing Friend of the Library, and held, towards the end of his life, the distinction of being Princeton's oldest living alumnus.

Arthur Cort Holden died on December 18, 1993, at the age of 103.

Family of Arthur Cort Holden

Edwin B. Holden = ACH's father

Alice Cort Holden = ACH's mother

Edwin Arthur Holden = ACH's son

Jane Holden Clay = ACH's daughter

Richmond Young Holden & Mary Jane = ACH's son and daughter-in-law

Woolverton, Mrs. Curtis (Frances Holden) = ACH's sister

Alice Holden = ACH's sister

Marian Holden = ACH's sister

Raymond P. Holden = ACH's brother

Albright, Bets Parker = ACH's niece

Amidon, Elaine H. = ACH's distant cousin

Atkins, Rosemary Barnes & Alan = Rose Barnes Holden's daughter and son-in-law

Atkinson, Mary Cort & John (& Luisa & Margaret) = ACH's granddaughter, grandson-in-law, and great-grandchildren

Bartos, Judy & Paul = granddaughter and grandson-in-law

Bron = ACH's cousin

Clay, George = ACH's grandson

Clay, Judith = ACH's granddaughter

Cort, Mortimer H. = ACH's uncle

Green, Gretchen & Thomas = Rose Barnes Holden's granddaughter and grandson-in-law

Green, Kate = Rose Barnes Holden's great-granddaughter

Hall, Dandy (Deborah Anne) = Rose Barnes Holden's granddaughter

Hall, Jesse Angell = Rose Barnes Holden's granddaughter

Hall, Louise & Jesse = Rose Barnes Holden's daughter & son-in-law

Hartz, Eleanore = Rose Barnes Holden's granddaughter

Holden, Christopher & Anne Karen = ACH's great-grandson and great-granddaughter-in-law

Holden, Edwin Ruthven = ACH's grandfather

Holden, Jeff & Laura (& Taylor & Schuyler) = ACH's grandson, granddaughter-in-law, and great-grandchildren

Holden, Luisa Hayward (& Quinn) = ACH's granddaughter, and great-grandson

Holden, Rick (Richmond II) & Margaret (& Richmond III, Carlin, Harry) = ACH's grandson, granddaughter-in-law, and great-grandchildren

Holden-Reed, Anne = ACH's niece

Holden-Wilson, J.

MacParker = ACH's nephew

Miller, Barbara & Donald H. = ACH's cousin

Parker, Katie = great-grandniece

Parker, Scudder & Pam = ACH's grandnephew and grandniece-in-law

Pattee, Sally = ACH's niece

Ryder, Mrs. Franklin (Fannie) = ACH's aunt

Warren, Judy & Fred = ACH's granddaughter and grandson-in-law

Warren, Erik & Corina = ACH's great-grandson and great-granddaughter-in-law

Woolverton, Rev. John = Frances Holden Woolverton's son?

Source: From the finding aid for C0767

Biography and History

The National Council of Jewish Women was founded in 1893 by Hannah Solomon, as part of the Parliament of Religions in the World's Columbian Exhibition in Chicago. At the close of the exhibition, Solomon and the others involved with its committee of Jewish women resolved that they would form a permanent organization, known as the NCJW, with a dual purpose. First, this new organization would work to keep Judaism alive by informing women of their religious duties and their role in rearing Jewish children. Secondly, its members would “take part as a large group in all that concerns the welfare of mankind,” working together to solve growing social problems that were impossible for the individual to combat alone. The Council quickly spread across the country, as a social and socially active women's club, so that by the time of its first triennial convention in 1896, the Council had more than four thousand members and fifty local sections.

In the past hundred years since its inception, the National Council of Jewish Women has grown to approximately one hundred thousand members and has established itself as one of the preeminent American reform organizations of the twentieth century. It has been actively involved in a wide variety of concerns including immigrant aid, opposition to the white slave trade, educational opportunities and vocational training for the blind and visually impaired, maternal and infant health care, establishment of child labor laws, religious education, opposition to anti-Semitism, international relief work, civil rights for blacks and women, and peace initiatives.

The journal in which these essays were first published, The Immigrant, was a monthly and then later a quarterly journal published by the National Council of Jewish Women, Department of Service to the Foreign Born (later known as the Department of Immigrant Aid) in New York City from 1921 to 1930. It was edited by Etta (Lasker) Rosensohn and Cecilia Razovsky.

Source: From the finding aid for C0880

Occupations

  • Architects -- New York (New York)..
  • Arthur Cort Holden Papers. 1940-1993 (inclusive).

    Call Number: AC246

    Arthur Cort Holden was a member of the Princeton University Class of 1912. He went on to earn a graduate degree in architecture from Cornell University, and joined the New York City firm of McKim, Mead, and White, later forming his own firm and advising Frank Lloyd Wright on the design of the Guggenheim Museum in 1949. Consists of personal papers and correspondence of Arthur Cort Holden.

  • Arthur Cort Holden Papers. 1940-1993 (inclusive).

    Call Number: AC246

    Arthur Cort Holden was a member of the Princeton University Class of 1912. He went on to earn a graduate degree in architecture from Cornell University, and joined the New York City firm of McKim, Mead, and White, later forming his own firm and advising Frank Lloyd Wright on the design of the Guggenheim Museum in 1949. Consists of personal papers and correspondence of Arthur Cort Holden.

  • Arthur Cort Holden Papers. 1845-1993 (inclusive), circa 1890-1993 (bulk).

    Call Number: C0767

    The Arthur Cort Holden Papers consists chiefly Holden's personal and professional papers, accumulated during his life (1890-1993) as an architect and active Princeton University alumnus. Also included are photographs, the papers of friends and family members, and miscellaneous printed matter dating from the 1840s to the 1990s.

  • Essays by Jewish-American Immigrant Women. circa 1925-1929 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C0880

    This collection consists of essays written by mainly Jewish women immigrants to the United States, regarding their lives and experiences. They were written in connection with English language classes given by the National Council of Jewish Women's Department of Immigrant Aid, and initially collected through a contest sponsored by the same organization. The winning essays were originally published in the journal The Immigrant, a publication of the Council.