Biography and History

William Kirkpatrick Selden (1911-) was an American educator.

Source: From the finding aid for AC006

Biography and History

As Princeton's student population expanded in the middle part of the 19th century, eating clubs were established to provide sufficient dining services. Eating clubs filled the social vacuum created when Greek-letter fraternities were banned in 1855 and became the dominant social influence among undergraduates. Throughout their history, the restricted clubs were criticized for their exclusivity and for creating artificial barriers among the student population. Membership declined in the years following the Second World War, particularly in the 1960s and 1970s when students sought more egalitarian social institutions. In 1969 the admittance of women into the University caused a stir among the clubs, but many embraced the change and opened membership to women. In 1979 Sally Frank, a third-year student, filed a lawsuit with the New Jersey Division of Civil Rights when she was denied membership in three of the exclusive clubs. The final verdict, announced in 1992, forced all clubs to admit women to their ranks. There are presently 14 active clubs on campus, the oldest of which is the Ivy Club, established in 1879.

Source: From the finding aid for AC030