Biography and History

William Meredith was born on January 9, 1919 in New York City. He was a member of the Princeton University class of 1940 and served in the United States Army Air Force from 1941 to 1942 and in the United States Navy from 1942 to 1946 and 1952 to 1954. He is best known for his book of poetry, Love Letter from an Impossible Land, published in 1944. He has taught at the University of Hawaii and Connecticut University. He passed away on May 30, 2007 in New London, Connecticut.

Source: From the finding aid for C0175

Biography and History

A member of the Princeton Class of 1940, William Meredith worked for the New York Times before joining the U.S. Army Air Force in 1941. Meredith later transferred to the Navy, serving as a pilot during World War II. During the war, Meredith's first collection of poems, Love Letter from an Impossible Land (1944) was published. After World War II, Meredith taught English at Princeton University and the University of Hawaii before returning to the Navy for service during the Korean War. Following the war, Meredith continued to teach and write, eventually joining the faculty of Connecticut College, where he taught from 1955 to 1983. In 1964, Meredith was elected a Chancellor of the American Academy of Poets and from 1978-1980, Meredith served as Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. Additionally, Meredith was recognized with the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry for his work, Partial Accounts: New and Selected Poems (1987), and the National Book Award for Efforts at Speech (1997). Meredith's friend, Robert Drew, was an artist.

Source: From the finding aid for C0780