Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE001

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE005

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE006

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE011

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE012

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE015

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE022

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson(1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized,they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection(Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE023

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE025

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE026

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE028

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE030

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE032

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE033

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE053

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE055

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE081

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE082

Biography and History

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

Source: From the finding aid for LAE097

Occupations

  • Children --Services for --Chile..
  • Department of Grounds and Buildings Technical Correspondence Records. 1866-1988 (inclusive), 1930s-1940s (bulk).

    Call Number: AC035

    The Technical Correspondence Records, created by the Department of Grounds and Buildings, contain detailed information relating to the construction, maintenance, renovation, and demolition of buildings, and to the grounds and architects of Princeton University.

  • Princeton University Library Records. 1734-2015 (inclusive), 1952-1995 (bulk).

    Call Number: AC123

    The Princeton University Library is one of the foremost university libraries in the world. With collections totaling over 12 million volumes, manuscripts, and nonprint items spread across fifteen buildings, the Princeton University Library system serves not only the Princeton University community but the world at large. The Princeton University Library Records consist of the files of the University Librarian and other Library administrators and departments, as well as of the Friends of the Princeton University Library. Materials in the record group include correspondence, reports, publications, clippings, minutes, press releases, proposals, statistics, photographs and other audiovisual materials, and microfilm. The records document the Library's day-to-day operations as well as its involvement with other departments on campus, other college and university libraries, and library users.

  • William S. Dix Papers. 1955-1978 (inclusive).

    Call Number: AC236

    William S. Dix was Princeton's University Librarian (1953-1975) and a prominent spokesperson for librarians worldwide. The William S. Dix papers contain correspondence, reports, articles, and other materials documenting Dix's many professional interests and activities outside of his position at Princeton.

  • Princeton University Publications Collection » Series 4: University Publications »

    Princeton University Publications Containing Material of a Scientific or Learned Character. 1917.
  • R. Ridgely Lytle World War I Collection. 1915-1916 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C0008

    Consists of World War I memorabilia, letters, photographs, and documents collected by R. Ridgely Lytle (Princeton Class of 1913) when he was a delegate in the province of Luxembourg for the Commission for Relief in Belgium and, later, a member of the American ambulance drivers in France.

  • Ernest Cushing Richardson Collection. 1832-1954 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C0341

    Consists of the personal papers of Ernest Cushing Richardson, librarian of Princeton University Library from 1890 till 1925.

  • Maurice Kelley Collection. 1935-1971 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C0457

    Contains correspondence, photographs, memorabilia, and printed matter of American educator and librarian, Maurice Kelley (Princeton Class of 1934).

  • Selected Papers of Edward Naumburg. 1882-1993 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C0561

    Consists of correspondence, files relating to collecting interests, and miscellanea of the American stockbroker and rare books and manuscripts collector Edward Naumburg (Princeton Class of 1924).

  • William A. Packard Collection. 1857-1878 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C0750

    Consists of selected papers of classics professor William A. Packard.

  • Howard C. Rice Correspondence with Alexander D. Wainwright. 1950-1980 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C1183

    Consists chiefly of correspondence between Howard C. Rice, Jr., and Alexander D. Wainwright, dating mainly during the time that Rice was working at the Collège de L'Europe Libre, in Strasbourg, France. Rice was an associate professor at Princeton University and Assistant Librarian for the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections. Wainwright was a librarian at Princeton University Library for many years, serving as currator of the Morris L. Parrish Collection of Victorian Novelists and as Assistant University Librarian for Acquisitions.

  • American Revolution Collection. 1765-1781 (inclusive).

    Call Number: C1284

    Consists of selected correspondence, documents, and other material related to the U.S. Continental Congress and the American Revolutionary War era, much of it concerning the state of New Jersey.

  • Women in Argentina, VII. 1993-2005 (inclusive).

    Call Number: HQ1532 W654 1993 LAE001

    This collection comprises a diversity of pamphlets, flyers, posters, newspapers, and other documents produced by political parties, women's organizations and movements, political and cultural organizations, city and state governments, as well as other publishers from Argentina.

  • Politics in Argentina, I. 1985-2000 (inclusive).

    Call Number: JL2092 .P645 LAE002

    This microfilm consists of monographs, serials, and ephemeral material associated with politics in Argentina from 1985 to 2000. The bulk of the material dates from about 1993 on.

  • Church Materials from Guatemala, II. 1913-2001 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MICROFILM 12378 LAE003

    This microfilm contains pamphlet materials published by Christian groups in Guatemala between 1929 and 2001.

  • Youth and Children in Peru. 1994-2003 (inclusive).

    Call Number: HQ799.P4 Y687 1994q LAE004

    This microfilm contains pamphlets, periodicals, and other miscellaneous items addressing a range of issues related to youth and children in Peru, such as labor, violence, health, education, and political participation and rights.

  • Environment and Ecology in Bolivia, I. 1985-2005 (inclusive).

    Call Number: GF532.B5 E584 1985 LAE005

    This collection consists of ephemera regarding the environment and ecology in Bolivia. The materials include reports, pamphlets, flyers, serials and posters produced primarily between 1998 and 2003.

  • Religion in Brazil, I. 1899-2002 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize BL2590.B7 R444 1899q LAE006

    This collection contains ephemera concerning religious issues and events in Brazil, published between 1899 and 2002.

  • Alternative Press from Venezuela, I. 1998-2004 (inclusive).

    Call Number: PN5101 .A473 1998q LAE007

    The material in this collection consists of newspapers from Venezuela that are published outside the mainstream and commercial press.

  • Socioeconomic Crisis and Political Participation in Argentina, I. 1995-2005 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize HC175 .S624 1983q LAE008

    The materials in this collection provide a look at the economic, political, and social response that surrounded and followed the profound economic crisis in Argentina in 2001.

  • Indigenous Peoples, Peasants, and Ethnic Minorities in Bolivia, I. 1970-2005 (inclusive).

    Call Number: HN275.3.I524 1970q LAE009

    This collection contains pamphlets, leaflets, serials, small monographs, and posters pertaining to indigenous peoples and other ethnic minorities in Bolivia.

  • Women in Central America, I. 1960-2004 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize HQ1467 .W653 1960q LAE010

    This collection contains pamphlets, reports, serials, monographs, and posters concerning the rights and conditions of women in Central America.

  • Politics in Venezuela, I. 1978-2004 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize F2328 .P644 1978q LAE011

    This collection consists of pamphlets, flyers, posters and serials documenting political activities and organizations in Venezuela from 1978 to 2004.

  • Cuban Protestant Serials II. 1979-1999 (inclusive).

    Call Number: F1760 .C58 1926 LAE012

    This collection contains serial publications issued in Cuba by various Presbyterian churches and organizations between 1979 and 1999.

  • Agrarian Issues in Bolivia, I. 1989-2004 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize HD1333.B5 A472 1989q LAE013

    This collection contains pamphlets, flyers, posters, and monographs pertaining to agrarian practices, land reform, sustainable development, the rights of campesinos and farmers, and rural conditions in general in Bolivia.

  • Protestant Churches in Cuba, IV. 1929-2003 (inclusive).

    Call Number: F1760 .P767 1929q LAE014

    This collection contains church materials published or distributed by Protestant organizations in various Cuban cities and provinces.

  • Catholic Church in Cuba, III. 1995-2001 (inclusive).

    Call Number: BX1451.A3 C373 1995 LAE015

    This collection contains materials published and distributed by various Catholic Church organizations in Cuba.

  • Children & Youth in Venezuela, I. 1992-2004 (inclusive).

    Call Number: HQ792.V4 C444 1992q LAE016

    This collection contains pamphlets, periodicals, flyers and other materials addressing a range of issues related to the rights and conditions of youth and children in Venezuela.

  • Children and Youth in Bolivia, I. 1986-2003 (inclusive).

    Call Number: HQ792.B6 C444 1986q LAE017

    This collection contains pamphlets, periodicals, instructional materials, and other items addressing a range of issues related to the rights and conditions of youth and children in Bolivia.

  • Church Materials from Mexico, II. 1926-2004 (inclusive).

    Call Number: BX1428.2 C582 1926 LAE018

    This collection consists mainly of religious pamphlets published in Mexico.

  • Economy, Industry, and Trade in Brazil, I. 1954-2005 (inclusive).

    Call Number: HC187 .E366 1954q LAE019

    This collection contains ephemera concerning the Brazilian economy, the external debt crisis, economic development, monetary policy, industry, technology, and trade.

  • Education in Bolivia, I. 1982-2003 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LA550 .E382 1982q LAE020

    This collection of pamphlets, reports, instructional materials, posters and other ephemera, documents Bolivian educational programs and initiatives at the turn of the twenty-first century.

  • Education in Chile, II. 1967-2005 (inclusive).

    Call Number: GF532.C5 E584 1992 LAE021

    The collection consists of pamphlets, reports, flyers, workbooks, and other materials relating to educational policies and their implementation, to social activism and political participation, and to alternative views on the role of education in Chilean society.

  • Education in Colombia, I. 1962-2005 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LA565 .E382 1962q LAE022

    The collection consists of pamphlets, reports, serials, and other materials relating to educational policies and their implementation, to social activism and political participation, and to alternative views on the role of education in Colombian society from 1962 to 2005.

  • Environment and Ecology in Brazil, I. 1975-2001 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize GF532.B6 E584 1975q LAE023

    This collection contains pamphlets, flyers, reports, working papers, and posters published between 1975 and 2001 concerning ecology and the environment in Brazil.

  • Environment and Ecology in Chile, II. 1992-2004 (inclusive).

    Call Number: GF532.C5 E584 1992 LAE024

    The materials included in this collection cover multiple aspects related to the environment and ecology in Chile. Types of materials include pamphlets, flyers, reports, and research papers published mostly by non-governmental organizations concerned with the protection of the environment, and by government agencies. The bulk of the material was published between the late 1990s and the early 2000s.

  • Environment and Ecology in Ecuador. 1987-2003 (inclusive).

    Call Number: GF532.E2 E584 1987q LAE025

    This collection contains ephemera pertaining to environmental and ecological issues in Ecuador. It consists of pamphlets, flyers, and serials published between 1987 and 2003, although the majority of documents were published after the mid 1990s. General subjects addressed by the ephemera include the petroleum industry, the role of foreign oil companies in Ecuador, sustainable development, environmental education, and conservation of land, resources, and species.

  • Health and Society in Bolivia. 1986-2003 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize RA461 .H424 1986q LAE026

    This collection contains ephemera concerning healthcare programs and practices in Bolivia from 1986-2003. The materials include flyers, pamphlets, posters, reports and working papers dating mostly from the late 1990s and early 2000s. Most were created and distributed by non-governmental organizations and by government agencies in this country.

  • Human and Civil Rights in Bolivia. 1981-2003 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize JC599.B6 H852 1981q LAE027

    This collection contains pamphlets, flyers, serials, and posters pertaining to human and civil rights in Bolivia. Almost all the documents included here are published within Bolivia, by both national and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs), as well as by the Bolivian government.

  • Human Rights in Argentina, III. 1978-2004 (inclusive).

    Call Number: JC599.A7 H852 1978q LAE028

    This collection contains pamphlets, flyers, and serials pertaining to human rights in Argentina. Most of the materials are about human rights abuses that took place during the 1976-1983 military dictatorship. Other materials have to do with a broader understanding of human rights that includes issues such as discrimination, police brutality, and the rights of children, immigrants, consumers, and workers. The majority of the ephemera was published by non-governmental human rights activist groups in Argentina between the early 1990s and 2004.

  • Industry and Infrastructure in Venezuela, I. 1992-2004 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize HC237 .I537 1992q LAE029

    This collection of pamphlets, serials, and bulletins pertains to industry and infrastructure in Venezuela. The majority of the materials in this collection were produced between 2000 and 2004. The ephemera was published by both private industrial organizations and Venezuelan government ministries and agencies.

  • Non-denominational Christian Organizations in Cuba, II. 1961-2002 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize BR645.C9 N66 1961q LAE030

    This collection contains materials published or distributed in Cuba by ecumenical or otherwise non-denominational Christian organizations - organizations which are not known to be affiliated with the Catholic Church, the Christian Orthodox Church, or any specific Protestant denomination. The publications in the collection include church bulletins, evangelical tracts, children's educational items, serials, monographs, pamphlets, and flyers, and the bulk of them date from the 1990s and 2000s.

  • Politics and Elections in Uruguay, I. 1984-2004 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize JL3694 .P644 1984q LAE032

    This collection comprises pamphlets, flyers, posters, and documents produced by political parties and organizations in Uruguay, relating to national elections and internal party processes.

  • Politics in Argentina, II. 1943-2004 (inclusive).

    Call Number: F2849 .P644 1943q LAE033

    This collection consists of flyers, pamphlets, and serials concerning the political process and society in Argentina. The material in the elections sections is comprised primarily of propaganda from the 2001 legislative elections and 2003 presidential elections in Argentina.

  • Women and Gender Issues in Bolivia, II. 1991-2003 (inclusive).

    Call Number: HQ1537 .W654 1991q LAE034

    This collection contains pamphlets, serials, monographs, and posters concerning the rights and conditions of women in Bolivia. Most of the material was published in Bolivia itself, between the years 1991 and 2003. Topics covered include women's rights, women in politics, domestic violence, women's health, indigenous women, and women in the labor force.

  • Agrarian Issues in Peru, III. 1920-2003 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize HD1902 .A472 1920q LAE035

    This collection contains pamphlets, bulletins, posters, and other miscellaneous items addressing a variety of agrarian issues in Peru, including farming techniques and practices, environmental concerns, land reform, political-economic aspects of agriculture, and the controversy over coca production.

  • Economic Development and Conditions in Peru, III. 1987-2003 (inclusive).

    Call Number: HC227 .E366 1987q LAE037

    This collection contains pamphlets, monographs, bulletins, flyers, posters, and other miscellaneous items addressing a variety of local and regional development issues in Peru, such as municipal administration, civic participation and community organizing, infrastructure, socioeconomic development, and decentralization.

  • Environment and Ecology in Peru, I. 1993-2003 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize GE160.P4 E584 1993q LAE038

    This collection contains pamphlets, bulletins, articles, reports, letters, flyers, and other miscellaneous items addressing a wide range of environmental issues in Peru, including conservation, environmental education and community initiatives, human health and the environment, legal and political issues, and mining.

  • Health in Peru. 1991-2003 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize RA477 .H424 1991q LAE039

    This collection contains pamphlets, articles, and other miscellaneous items addressing a range of health-related topics in Peru, such as domestic violence, substance abuse, sexual and reproductive health, HIV and AIDS, religious health education, and nutrition.

  • Human Rights in Peru, II. 1978-2003 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize JC599.P4 H852 1978q LAE040

    This collection contains pamphlets, articles, reports, flyers, posters, and other miscellaneous items addressing a variety of human rights issues in Peru, such as political violence, torture, political prisoners, displaced populations, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

  • Politics in Peru, IV. 1976-2003 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize F3448.2 .P644 1976q LAE041

    This collection contains pamphlets, articles, bulletins, pronouncements, flyers, posters, and other miscellaneous items addressing a range of political issues in Peru, including the electoral process, electoral education, corruption, impunity, privatization, and rondas campesinas (sometimes translated as peasant patrollers).

  • Protestant Churches in Cuba III. 1947-2002 (inclusive).

    Call Number: F1760 .P767 1947q LAE042

    This microfilm contains materials published or distributed by Protestant organizations in Cuba. Many are published or printed by independent evangelical groups but distributed by various Protestant denominations or individual churches.

  • Women in Chile, V. 1989-2002 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize HQ1546 .W653 1989q LAE043

    This microfilm is the fifth in a series of collections of pamphlet materials relating to issues concerning women in Chile. The subjects of the pamphlets vary widely and include such topics as women's health, gender in the labor market, violence in the family, indigenous women, and the legal and civil rights of women. The materials are published by a wide variety of organizations, including non-governmental organizations, religious groups, and government bodies.

  • Women in Peru, III. 1986-2003 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize HQ1572 .W653 1986q LAE044

    This collection contains pamphlets, articles, declarations, posters, and other miscellaneous items addressing a variety of women's issues in Peru, such as health, violence, labor, prostitution, ethnicity, grass-roots organizing, and political participation.

  • Mexican Elections 1997. 1990-1997 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LAE045 MICROFILM 11696

    This collection contains documents, pamphlets, articles, flyers, posters, banners and other miscellaneous propaganda items produced by the Mexican political parties leading up to the 1997 elections.

  • Arts and Culture in Brazil. 1962-2007 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LAE046

    This collection on the arts and culture in Brazil includes flyers, pamphlets, reports, working papers, and serials.

  • Augusto Pinochet Ugarte Case. 1998-2000 (inclusive).

    Call Number: F3100 A938 LAE047

    This collection contains documents, declarations, correspondence and other public and private statements from Chilean as well as international organizations issued between 1998 and 2000 concerning the trial of Chilean president Augusto Pinochet Ugarte.

  • Brazilian "Literatura de Cordel". 1970s-1990s (inclusive).

    Call Number: PQ9689.xL5 LAE048

    The cordéis or Brazilian chapbooks included in this collection were published between 1970 and 1990. Many of the items are undated.

  • Brazilian Literature and Criticism: Pamphlets I. 1916-1991 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MICROFILM 11585 LAE049

    This microfilm contains pamphlets on Brazilian literature and criticism published in Brazil between 1916 and 1991.

  • Brazilian Poetry: Pamphlets I. 1948-1998 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MICROFILM 11585 LAE050

    This microfilm contains poetry pamphlets by Brazilians issued between 1948 and 1998.

  • The Catholic Church in Cuba. 1996-2000 (inclusive).

    Call Number: BX1451.A3 C373 1996 LAE051

    This collection contains pamphlets and serials published and distributed by the Catholic Church and affiliated organizations throughout Cuba between 1996 and 2000.

  • Church Materials from Mexico I. 1851-1999 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MICROFILM 11799 LAE052

    This microfilm consists mainly of Catholic religious pamphlets published in Mexico, covering a wide range of subjects such as art, liturgy and catechism, as well as social issues related to women, indigenous groups, youth, and other topics. The bulk of the material was published in the 1980s and after.

  • Church Materials from Uruguay, II. 1914-2001 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MICROFILM 12379 LAE053

    This microfilm is second in a series and consists of pamphlets, serials, and monographs either published by organizations in Uruguay or published by outside organizations but pertaining to the subject of religion in Uruguay.

  • Education in Brazil. 1940-2006 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LAE055

    This collection of workbooks, reports, serials, pamphlets, and flyers documents the history of Brazilian educational initiatives and programs over the past six decades, from 1940 to 2006, with an emphasis on materials from the late 1980s and early 1990s.

  • Fraternal Organizations in Cuba. 1954-2000 (inclusive).

    Call Number: HS571.A6 F733 LAE056

    This collection consists of publications issued by three Cuban fraternal organizations: Gran Logia de Cuba, Orden Caballero de la Luz and the Orden Rosacruz.

  • Gay and lesbian issues in Chile, I. 1991-2001 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MICROFILM 11764 LAE057

    This microfilm consists primarily of pamphlets, declarations, flyers and posters issued between 1991 and 2001 by organizations concerned with gay, lesbian and transgender issues and advocacy in Chile.

  • Gay and Lesbian Issues in Latin America. 1963-2001 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MICROFILM 11766 LAE058

    This microfilm consists of pamphlets and serials issued between 1963 and 2001 by organizations concerned with gay and lesbian issues and advocacy. The countries best represented are Mexico, Costa Rica and Peru.

  • Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transvestite Issues in Argentina. 1985-2001 (inclusive).

    Call Number: HQ75.16.A7.G39 LAE059

    This film contains materials either published by or targeted towards the gay, lesbian, bisexual, transvestite and transgender population of Argentina. The materials include flyers, pamphlets, posters, and public communications in the form of press releases, letters, and e-mails.

  • Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transvestite Issues in Brazil. 1981-1999 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MICROFILM 11767 LAE060

    This microfilm contains materials either published by or targeting the gay, lesbian, bisexual, transvestite and transgender population of Brazil. The materials include flyers, pamphlets, posters, and public communications in the form of press releases, letters, and e-mails.

  • HIV/AIDS in Latin America: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Puerto Rico, Uruguay, Latin America. 1988-2000 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MICROFILM 11765 LAE062

    This microfilm consists of pamphlets and ephemera published by non-governmental organizations and government agencies from various Latin American countries in relation to HIV/AIDS.

  • Indigenous Issues in Ecuador. 1983-2001 (inclusive).

    Call Number: F3722 .I524 LAE063

    This collection consists primarily of pamphlets, flyers and posters addressing a wide range of issues affecting the indigenous communities of Ecuador, including, but not limited to, agriculture, health, human rights, culture, politics, religions, tourism and women’s issues. These materials were published between 1983 and 2001.

  • Indigenous Peoples and Ethnic Minorities in Peru. 1982-2008 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LAE064

    This collection of Peruvian ephemera contains flyers, pamphlets, and reports, as well as magazines and serials.

  • Labor in Argentina. 1989-2002 (inclusive).

    Call Number: HD8266 .L326 LAE065

    This collection consists of pamphlets, flyers, and some serials issued between 1989 and 2002 by a wide variety of labor organizations in Argentina, including actors guild, state workers, financial sector employees, and industrial laborers; also included are publications from various research and academic centers.

  • Labor in Brazil. 1980-2005 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LAE066

    This collection on labor-related issues and events in Brazil includes flyers, brochures, pamphlets, reports, serials, working papers, and other materials.

  • Non-denominational Christian Organizations in Cuba. 1955-2000 (inclusive).

    Call Number: Oversize BR645.C9 N66 1955 LAE067

    This microfilm contains materials published by Cuban Christian organizations which either have an ecumenical focus or for which no denominational affiliation can be identified. Most of the material consists of newsletters, small religious tracts, and educational materials, such as series of biblical lessons or books of hymns.

  • Politics in Chile I. 1968-2001 (inclusive).

    Call Number: JL2692 .P645 LAE070

    This microfilm consists of monographs, serials, and ephemeral material associated with politics in Chile from 1968 to 2001. The bulk of the material dates from about 1985 on.

  • Politics in Mexico. 1993-1999 (inclusive).

    Call Number: JL1292 .P645 LAE072

    This microfilm, entitled Politics in Mexico (1993-1999), contains, serials, monographs, and ephemeral materials pertaining to politics that are published by political parties, government bodies, and other politically and socially active institutions in Mexico.

  • Protestant Churches in Cuba II. 1941-2000 (inclusive).

    Call Number: BX4835.C8.P767 LAE074

    This microfilm contains materials published or distributed by Protestant Christian organizations in Cuba. Many are published or printed by independent evangelical groups and distributed by various denominations or churches.

  • Religion in Cuba: Non-Christians and General Publications. 1972-1998 (inclusive).

    Call Number: F1760 .C58 1926 LAE075

    This collection contains religious materials published in Cuba between 1972 and 1998 and issued by non-Christian and secular organizations.

  • Religion in Cuba: Protestant Churches in Cuba. 1926-1999 (inclusive).

    Call Number: F1760 .C58 1926 LAE076

    This collection contains materials published and / or distributed in Cuba by Protestant churches and organizations, and issued between 1926 and 1999.

  • Religion in Cuba: The Catholic Church. 1904-1998 (inclusive).

    Call Number: F1760 .C58 1926 LAE077

    This collection contains materials published and/or distributed in Cuba by the Catholic Church and affiliated organizations, and issued between 1904 and 1998.

  • Religion in Ecuador. 1977-2000 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MICROFILM 11781 LAE078

    This microfilm consists of pamphlets and booklets issues between 1977 and 2000 in Ecuador covering a wide range of themes touching on religion, among them: art and culture, biblical studies, biographies, catechism, family and education.

  • Religion in Perú. 1871-2001 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MICROFILM 11780 LAE079

    This microfilm consists primarily of pamphlets published in Peru relating to church and religion. Themes covered include history, indigenous peoples, internal church affairs, youth, social issues, politics, biographies and art. The bulk of the material was published during the 1990s.

  • Rural and Agrarian Issues in Brazil. 1971-2005 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LAE080

    This collection contains pamphlets, serials, reports, booklets, and flyers pertaining to rural conditions and agrarian practices in Brazil.

  • Women and Children in Brazil, II. 1983-2005 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LAE081

    This collection of ephemera on women and children in Brazil consists of pamphlets, flyers, and serials published by governmental and non-governmental organizations between 1983 and 2005.

  • Urban Issues in Brazil. 1975-2006 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LAE082

    This collection contains pamphlets, flyers, bound reports, and working papers pertaining to a wide range of urban issues in Brazil.

  • Women and Gender Issues in Latin America. 1932-1998 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MICROFILM 11592 LAE083

    This microfilm consists primarily of pamphlets published by non-governmental organizations and government agencies from various Latin American countries in relation to women and gender issues. The bulk of the material was published during the 1980s and 1990s.

  • Women in Argentina, V: Pamphlets. 1982-1998 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MICROFILM 11586 LAE084

    This microfilm consists of pamphlets published between 1982 and 1998 by community and national organizations as well as government agencies covering women-related issues in Argentina.

  • Women in Argentina, VI. 1989-2001 (inclusive).

    Call Number: HQ1532 .W653 LAE085

    This collection consists of pamphlets published between 1989 and 2001 by community and national organizations as well as government agencies covering women-related issues in Argentina.

  • Women in Chile, IV: Pamphlets. 1985-1998 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MICROFILM 11587 LAE086

    This microfilm consists of pamphlets published between 1985 and 1998 by community, national and international organizations covering women-related issues in Chile.

  • Youth in Chile, II. 1988-2006 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LAE087

    This collection contains pamphlets, flyers, working papers, institutional reports, and periodicals addressing issues related to children and youth in post-dictatorship Chile.

  • Armed Conflict and Human Rights in Colombia. 1973-2007 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LAE088

    This collection of ephemera consists of pamphlets, reports, periodicals, brochures, and flyers which relate to the armed conflict and human rights in Colombia.

  • Indigenous Peoples in Chile. 1970-2002 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LAE091 MICROFILM 11795

    This microfilm consists of pamphlet materials relating to the culture, living conditions, and legal rights of the indigenous peoples of Chile.

  • Politics in Peru, I. 1931-2000 (inclusive).

    Call Number: MICROFILM 11758 LAE092

    This microfilm covers primarily the 1990, 1995, 2000 and 2001 elections in Peru. It contains election propaganda and literature from participating political parties, political analysis, and official government publications.

  • Non-Christian Religious and Spiritual Organizations in Cuba. 1913-2006 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LAE093

    This collection contains bulletins, evangelical tracts, serials, monographs, pamphlets, and flyers published or distributed in Cuba by non-Christian religious and spiritual bodies.

  • Non-denominational Christian Organizations in Cuba, III. 1953-2009 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LAE094

    This collection contains pamphlets, bulletins, evangelical tracts, serials, booklets, and flyers published or distributed by non-denominational Christian organizations in Cuba.

  • Protestant Churches in Cuba, V. 1966-2004 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LAE095

    This collection contains material published or distributed by Protestant churches and organizations in Cuba.

  • Protestant Churches in Cuba, VI. 1944-2007 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LAE096

    This collection contains religious publications from Protestant churches and organizations in Cuba.

  • The Catholic Church in Cuba, IV. 1988-2008 (inclusive).

    Call Number: LAE097