Public Policy Papers

Public Policy Papers

Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library
65 Olden Street
Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
(609) 258-6345
Housed at the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, the Public Policy Papers include important collections representing individuals and organizations in the areas of 20th-century American foreign policy, jurisprudence, journalism, public policy formation, and economic development.

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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Walter Johnson Papers on Adlai E. Stevenson contain Johnson's records as co-chairman of the National Committee for Stevenson for President 1952, more popularly known as the Draft Stevenson Committee at the Democratic Convention. Johnson used these records to later write his book, How We Drafted Adlai Stevenson.
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Paris Peace Conference 1919-1920
Ray Stannard Baker (1870-1946) was a journalist, editor, and author. He earned recognition for his articles on liberal reform, for his philosophical essays written under the pseudonym David Grayson, and for his authorized biography and other works on President Woodrow Wilson. Baker's papers contain materials collected for his biography of President Woodrow Wilson and related to the Paris Peace Conference (1919-1920), which he attended as Director of the American Press Bureau, and include correspondence, publications, photographs, and newspaper clippings.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Prentice Northup Dean (1897-1981) was a practicing economist for the United States Tariff Commission and the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He also held teaching positions at Princeton University, the University of Pittsburgh, and Buena Vista University. Dean's papers document his service as United States delegate to the meetings of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and his years studying at the American University in Beirut, and include correspondence, diaries, documentation of conferences, memorabilia, and newspaper clippings. The papers also include the correspondence, diaries, and manuscripts of his family members May Dershimer née Walter and Martin R. Walter.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Werner (pseudonym of Alexander Schifrin) was a Russian native who was exiled to Germany (1923-1933) and subsequently lived in France (1933-1939) and the United States (1940-1951). Consists of selected papers of Werner
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Lyman B. Kirkpatrick, Jr. served with the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) from its inception in 1947 until 1965. The papers document Kirkpatrick's career at the CIA, including his role as inspector general during the Bay of Pigs invasion, as well as his service in the U.S. Army and Office of Strategic Services during World War II, and his time as a professor of political science at Brown University.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Livingston T. Merchant was a diplomat and high-ranking government official. This collection consists of Merchant's papers, including correspondence, articles, notes, speeches, statements, interviews, clippings, printed matter, and personal papers.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Lindley M. Garrison (1864-1932) was a lawyer who served as Secretary of War for President Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1916. Garrison's papers document his service as Secretary of War and include correspondence, writings, and newspaper clippings.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists primarily of newspaper clippings, study materials, and other printed matter of Find (Princeton Class of 1922) reflecting his interests in the Far East, Chinese languages and education, the Soviet Union, the United States government, and the Vietnam conflict.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
John E. Rovensky (1880-1970) was a banker and economist. As a banker, he held the position of vice president at the National Bank of Commerce, Bank of America, and City Bank. As an economist, he was a member of the Economists' National Committee on Monetary Policy, the National Monetary Association, and the Stable Money Association. Rovensky's papers document his work as an economist, including his tenure as president of the Stable Money Association in 1927. The papers are comprised of correspondence, offprints, and newspaper clippings.