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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Adlai E. Stevenson Papers document the public life of Adlai Stevenson (1900-1965), governor of Illinois, Democratic presidential candidate, and United Nations ambassador. The collection contains correspondence, speeches, writings, campaign materials, subject files, United Nations materials, personal files, photographs, and audiovisual materials, illuminating Stevenson's career in law, politics, and diplomacy, primarily from his first presidential campaign until his death in 1965.
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American civil liberties union
The American Civil Liberties Union Records, The Roger Baldwin years, document the activities of the ACLU from 1917 through 1950. The files contain materials on conscientious objection, freedom of speech, academic freedom, censorship, and labor concerns. The files reflect work on litigation, advocacy, and public policy. Materials include correspondence and newspaper clippings. Subgroup 1 has been digitized in its entirety and is available for members of the Princeton community to view here . To view the database from outside Princeton University, please see the Guide to the American Civil Liberties Union Records .
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American civil liberties union
This collection consists of the papers received and generated by the staff of the Washington, D.C. Office of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) during the 1950s and 1960s. The ACLU is a leading defender of civil liberties in the United States. Founded in 1920, it has been the recipient of sharp criticism for its willingness to defend unpopular causes and has participated in a majority of the landmark cases to come before the Supreme Court in the twentieth century. The Washington Office's primary responsibility is to monitor legislative issues. In the 1950s the office worked against abuses caused by McCarthyism, including loyalty oath requirements, powers of legislative investigating committees, and censorship of free speech and expression. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, the office focused on civil rights issues and the defense of alternative means of self expression. The Washington Office was also deeply involved with defending the civil liberties of those associated with the federal government and its agencies.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
This collection consists of papers of Antōnēs Dekavalles, a Greek poet, professor at Fairleigh Dickenson University, and editor of The Charioteer, A Review of Modern Greek Culture. Included are: correspondence, autograph manuscripts and typescripts, drafts, miscellaneous notes, and files related to his affiliated organizations.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
In January 1969, Princeton's trustees voted to make the undergraduate college coeducational, breaking the 224-year tradition of an all-male student body. The Patterson Committee, made up of faculty and administrators, had studied and advocated the change. The one dissenting voice on the committee was Arthur J. Horton '42, the university's director of development; he wrote a minority report and became a rallying point for those opposing the move. Horton's collection of materials on coeducation contains his annotated copy of the committee's report, his memoranda to the committee's chair and university administrators, official university releases and letters to alumni, and newspaper clippings regarding the change and campus issues in general. A quarter of the collection is letters from alumni, some welcoming coeducation but most strongly opposed.
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Association on American Indian Affairs
The Records of the Association on American Indian Affairs document the corporate life of an influential and resilient player in the history of twentieth-century Native American advocacy. From its formation by non-Indians in New York in 1922 to its re-establishment in South Dakota in 1995 under a wholly Indian administration, the AAIA has defended the rights and promoted the welfare of Native Americans and, in this process, has shaped the views of their fellow citizens. The AAIA has waged innumerable battles over the years, touching on the material and spiritual well-being of Indians in every state of the Union: from the right of Native Americans to control their resources to their right to worship freely; from their right to federal trusteeship to their right to self-determination. The evolving nature of this struggle, in terms of conception and execution; the environment in which it was waged, both within and without the AAIA; the parade of men and women who figured in it; and the relationships among them can all be found in the abundant and insightful records which constitute these Records. The correspondence, minutes, reports, articles, clippings, and other documents in the collection, augmented by photographic and audiovisual material, represent a window not only on the AAIA but on the entities and personalities with which it interacted. While its vision has co-existed with others, and while it has been far from alone in its contribution to Indian life, no consideration of twentieth-century Native American affairs can disregard its arduous and, for the most part, fruitful work.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists of two groups of material collected by Ferree: 1) copies of government reports, resolutions, proclamations, statements, and clippings concerning foreign relations, the entry of the United States into World War I, and other varied issues during the administration of Woodrow Wilson.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Educator and advocate of minority education Dr. Carl A. Fields, the first African American to hold a high-ranking position at an Ivy League school, was appointed Assistant Director of Student Aid and then Assistant Dean of the College at Princeton before serving in other leadership positions outside the University. The Carl A. Fields Papers consist of correspondence, reports, research material on race relations and minority education, handwritten notes, project proposals, and other papers that document his life and career.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Charles Greene Rockwood was a professor of mathematics from 1877 to 1905 at Princeton Unviersity, and had many interests in seismology and general scientific study. Consists of scrapbooks of newspaper clippings, letters, notes, and printed matter compiled by Charles Greene Rockwood, relating to earthquakes, tidal waves, volcanos, and unusual astronomical occurrences.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists of selected papers of Thompson, including 27 scrapbooks of clippings (1884-1941) of his columns and articles written while he was a Washington correspondent, book reviewer, and editor of the New York Times (1899-1921) and, later, a writer in Philadelphia for the Public Ledger (1921-1922) and Commonweal (1930-1931).
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Cyrus Fogg Brackett Lectureship in Applied Engineering and Technology was established in memory of Professor Brackett in 1921 and continued until 1953. The collection contains many of the lectures–both in manuscript and published form–and correspondence with lecturers and potential lecturers. The collection also includes some general materials relating to the lectureship, such as citations, registries, histories, schedules, and short summaries of Professor Brackett's life and accomplishments.
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David A. Morse Papers, 1895-2003 (mostly 1942-1990)
MC097
124 boxes 1 folder 1 item

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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The David A. Morse Papers document the life and times of David Abner Morse (1907-1990), American lawyer, soldier, and public official. While he distinguished himself in legal, military, and governmental circles, the most fruitful years of his life were spent at the helm of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the oldest member of the United Nations' family of specialized agencies. As Director-General of the International Labour Office in Geneva from 1948 to 1970, Morse guided the increasingly complex activities of this tripartite organization, which unites in one body the representatives of workers, governments, and employers. No one has had a longer tenure as its head, and no one has presided over such far-reaching changes in its composition and orientation. Drawing on a variety of experiences in the field of domestic and international labor, including appointments as Assistant, Under, and Acting Secretary of Labor in the Truman administration, Morse gave practical meaning in a postwar context to the ILO's underlying philosophy, namely, that "universal and lasting peace can be established only if it is based upon social justice." The pursuit of this object won for the ILO the Nobel Peace Prize in 1969. The David Morse Papers contain correspondence, reports, memoranda, photographs, and newspaper clippings that document this long, productive career.
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Department of English Records, 1872-2017
AC134
34 boxes 1 websites

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Princeton university, Department of English
The papers of Princeton University's English Department document the many varied aspects of one of Princeton's largest academic departments. With some writings that pre-date the Department's formal establishment in 1904, the collection includes faculty meeting and sub-committee minutes; faculty personnel papers and correspondence; the papers of many prominent faculty members, which include class lectures, syllabi, and original scholarship; records of departmental majors; student work; and scrapbooks of publicity and memorabilia about the Department, its faculty, staff, and students, both undergraduate and graduate.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
This collection consists of selected editorial correspondence of the New York weekly The Independent, founded in 1848 by Henry Chandler Bowen as a Congregationalist journal which later expanded in scope to include articles on literary and social topics. Successive editors were Theodore Tilton, 1856-1861 and 1864-1871, Henry Ward Beecher, 1861-1864, William Hayes Ward, 1868-1916, Kinsley Twining, literary editor, 1880-1899, and Hamilton Holt, 1897-1921. The collection contains approximately 85 letters, 1882-1899, to Kinsley Twining (1832-1901), a Congregationalist minister, William Hayes Ward (1835-1916), a Congregationalist minister, orientalist, and professor of Latin and natural science, Miss [Susan Hayes] Ward, and Hamilton Holt by various contributors to The Independent.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Edward Le Roy Rice was an American entrepreneur, producer of minstrel shows, and dealer in theatrical memorabilia. His collection consists of correspondence, both business and personal, documents, miscellaneous material, and many newspapers and clippings regarding Rice's interests in radio, film, and theater.
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Freedom House Records, 1933-2017
MC187
196 boxes 1 folder 6 items

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Freedom House U.S.
The Freedom House Records document the organization's activities in advocating freedom and democracy throughout the world. The records provide an invaluable insight into an organization that evolved from an answer to Hitler's Braunhaus to a diligent monitor of freedom worldwide.
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Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
George McAneny served in numerous positions in the government of New York City, including president of the Borough of Manhattan (1910-1913), president of the Board of Aldermen (1914-1916), and chairman of the State Transit Commission (1921). This collection consists of lectures, reports, correspondence, committee and association files, clippings, scrapbooks, and photographs, all of which reflect his special interests in regional and city planning, zoning, city and state transit, and city financing.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
George Stanley McGovern was a Congressman (1957-1961), a U.S. Senator (1963-1981), and a Democratic presidential nominee known for his strong liberal stance, particularly during the Vietnam War. This collection contains legislation files, campaign materials, correspondence, speech texts, schedules and invitations, travel files, patronage files, subject files, photographs, and audiovisual materials documenting McGovern's activities in the House of Representatives and in the U.S. Senate, as well as his time as Director of Food for Peace.
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Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
The Audiovisual Materials series documents McGovern's political activities from 1957-1984. It contains film footage, video recordings, audiotapes and audiocassettes, computer tapes and diskettes, and other formats. It is the only series in this collection that includes material for the years 1981-1984.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists of copies of court documents, correspondence, and clippings of Hank Adams, an Assinboine-Sioux Indian, who worked for the National Indian Youth Council and the National Congress of American Indians, and as national director (1968- ) of the Survival of American Indians Association (SAIA).
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Hedges family produced three Princetonians in two generations: Benjamin van Doren Hedges (1866-1930, Princeton class of 1888) and his sons Benjamin van Doren Hedges (1907-1969, Princeton class of 1930) and Robert W. Hedges (1908-1950, Princeton class of 1931). This collection contains scrapbooks, to all three Hedges family Princetonians, as well as several other family members, including materials produced at Princeton and elsewhere.
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Labouisse, Henry R., 1904-1987
Henry R. Labouisse (1904-1987) was a distinguished American diplomat and international public servant. He served as director of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) from 1954 to 1958 and as executive director of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) from 1965 to 1979. He also served as a United States government official working on the formation and implementation of foreign economic policies during World War II and the 1960s. Labouisse's papers document his career with the United Nations and with the State Department and include correspondence, speeches and publications, as well as biographical and genealogical material.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Herbert Adams Gibbons was a journalist and foreign correspondent. Consists of papers of Gibbons from the periods when he was a foreign correspondent (1909-1916) in Greece, Spain, Turkey and other Near Eastern countries, a serviceman with the American Expeditionary Forces in France (1917-1918), and a correspondent (1920-1931) for various American magazines in Europe, the Orient, and Africa.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Howard C. Petersen (1910-1995) was an expert in international economics and foreign trade. He served in the War Department under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, as Assistant Secretary of War for President Harry S. Truman, as National Finance Chairman and fundraiser for the Dwight D. Eisenhower campaigns, and as Special Assistant on International Trade for President John F. Kennedy. Petersen was also a principal drafter of the Selective Service Act, a lawyer, and president of Fidelity-Philadelphia Trust Company. Petersen's papers document his entire career, especially his work with the new Security and Exchange Commission regulations as a lawyer in the 1930s and with the United States War Department during World War II, and include correspondence, articles, and publications.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists of papers of Scott relating primarily to his mission as a military member of the Special Diplomatic Commission headed by Elihu Root, which was sent to Russia by Woodrow Wilson in 1917.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Jacob D. Beam, class of 1929, was a career diplomat, serving as United States ambassador to Poland (1957-1961), Czechoslovakia (1966-1969), and the Soviet Union (1969-1973). The collection contains correspondence, reports, newspaper clippings, photographs and assorted memorabilia, documenting sixty years of Ambassador Beam's life and service.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
John E. Rovensky (1880-1970) was a banker and economist. As a banker, he held the position of vice president at the National Bank of Commerce, Bank of America, and City Bank. As an economist, he was a member of the Economists' National Committee on Monetary Policy, the National Monetary Association, and the Stable Money Association. Rovensky's papers document his work as an economist, including his tenure as president of the Stable Money Association in 1927. The papers are comprised of correspondence, offprints, and newspaper clippings.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists primarily of newspaper clippings, study materials, and other printed matter of Find (Princeton Class of 1922) reflecting his interests in the Far East, Chinese languages and education, the Soviet Union, the United States government, and the Vietnam conflict.
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Princeton University. Lesbian Gay Bisexual Alliance.
The Lesbian Gay Bisexual Alliance (LGBA), is the social and political organization for lesbian, gay, and bisexual students at Princeton University. The LGBA is the successor to the Gay Alliance of Princeton (GAP), Gay Women of Princeton (GWOP), the Lesbian and Bisexual Task Force (LBTF), and Gay and Lesbian Alliance of Princeton (GALAP). The records contain material regarding the LGBA's programs and its publications, as well as subject files assembled by the LGBA's officers and staff.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Lindley M. Garrison (1864-1932) was a lawyer who served as Secretary of War for President Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1916. Garrison's papers document his service as Secretary of War and include correspondence, writings, and newspaper clippings.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Livingston T. Merchant was a diplomat and high-ranking government official. This collection consists of Merchant's papers, including correspondence, articles, notes, speeches, statements, interviews, clippings, printed matter, and personal papers.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Lyman B. Kirkpatrick, Jr. served with the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) from its inception in 1947 until 1965. The papers document Kirkpatrick's career at the CIA, including his role as inspector general during the Bay of Pigs invasion, as well as his service in the U.S. Army and Office of Strategic Services during World War II, and his time as a professor of political science at Brown University.
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María Rosa Oliver Papers, 1899-1997 (mostly 1930-1975)
C0829
9 boxes 54 items 4.5 linear feet

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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists of writings, correspondence, documents, drawings, photographs, papers of others, and printed material of María Rosa Oliver (1898-1977), Argentine essayist, short story writer, literary critic, and translator.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Werner (pseudonym of Alexander Schifrin) was a Russian native who was exiled to Germany (1923-1933) and subsequently lived in France (1933-1939) and the United States (1940-1951). Consists of selected papers of Werner
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McCarter Theatre Records, 1922-2016
AC131
209 boxes 1 folder 6 items

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McCarter Theatre Center (Princeton, N.J.)
The McCarter Theatre was conceived as a permanent home for the Princeton University Triangle Club. McCarter began as a booking theater but ultimately moved into producing its own performances. The McCarter Theatre records document the history of the McCarter Theatre, including administration, performances and productions, and the building itself.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Mildred Gilman Wohlforth was an American journalist, newspaper reporter, and novelist. Her papers include over 600 letters from friends, family, and literary associates, along with autograph and typed manuscripts for several unpublished novels. Also present are selected papers of her husband, Robert Wohlforth, a journalist, business analyst, and author.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Nadine Taub Collection of Sally Frank Court Documents chronicle Nadine Taub's role as co-counsel for Sally Frank, Princeton Class of 1980, in her thirteen-year legal battle after filing a sex discrimination complaint with the New Jersey Division on Civil Rights against Ivy Club, Tiger Inn, University Cottage Club and Princeton University, alleging that the clubs discriminated against her because of her gender. A significant part of the collection contains legal documents from Sally Frank's co-counsel as well as from defending counsel; research material including minutes, reports, newspaper clippings, campus publications, correspondence, and deeds; correspondence to and from Nadine Taub and Sally Frank, which is restricted until 2016; and from various counsel and judicial members.
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Phi Beta Kappa Records, 1896-1969
AC034
3 boxes 1 folder

Phi Beta Kappa. New Jersey Beta (Princeton University).
The Princeton University Phi Beta Kappa Records consist of correspondence, reports, minutes, and other materials relating to the administration, membership, and finances of this organization.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Prentice Northup Dean (1897-1981) was a practicing economist for the United States Tariff Commission and the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He also held teaching positions at Princeton University, the University of Pittsburgh, and Buena Vista University. Dean's papers document his service as United States delegate to the meetings of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and his years studying at the American University in Beirut, and include correspondence, diaries, documentation of conferences, memorabilia, and newspaper clippings. The papers also include the correspondence, diaries, and manuscripts of his family members May Dershimer née Walter and Martin R. Walter.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Blanche Pauli (born Virginia C. Taney) was an American singer, actress, and vaudeville performer who worked mainly in stock companies touring the northeastern United States and Canada from the late 1890s through 1904. The collection consists of personal and family correspondence and documents, photographs, play scripts and actor's sides, sheet music, playbills, clippings, and other materials related to her professional career. Some materials also relate to Pauli's husband, Herman Utley Boardman; her performance partner, Robson Dalton; and other members of her family.
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Student Christian Association (Princeton University).
The Student Christian Association and its predecessors were the dominant religious organizations at Princeton University for almost a hundred and fifty years. The Philadelphian Society, founded by a small group of students in 1825, was the quasi-official campus religious agency by the beginning of the twentieth century. In 1930 the Student-Faculty Association (SFA), organized by the Dean of the Chapel, took over the Society's programs, focusing on community service. In 1946 the Student Christian Association (SCA) replaced both the Society and the SFA, coordinating both religious and community service activities in campus. The Student Volunteers Council succeeded the SCA in 1967.
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Paris Peace Conference 1919-1920
Ray Stannard Baker (1870-1946) was a journalist, editor, and author. He earned recognition for his articles on liberal reform, for his philosophical essays written under the pseudonym David Grayson, and for his authorized biography and other works on President Woodrow Wilson. Baker's papers contain materials collected for his biography of President Woodrow Wilson and related to the Paris Peace Conference (1919-1920), which he attended as Director of the American Press Bureau, and include correspondence, publications, photographs, and newspaper clippings.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Sonja Karsen, born in 1919, was a professor of Spanish at Skidmore College and intensively researched Jaime Torres Bodet and Guillermo Valencia, two Latin American politicians and poets. The Sonja Karsen papers contain much of her research on these two figures.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Walter Johnson Papers on Adlai E. Stevenson contain Johnson's records as co-chairman of the National Committee for Stevenson for President 1952, more popularly known as the Draft Stevenson Committee at the Democratic Convention. Johnson used these records to later write his book, How We Drafted Adlai Stevenson.
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Rhomaïdès frères
The Willis M. Rivinus Papers contain research materials gathered by Rivinus documenting the legal case of Sally Frank v. Ivy Club, University Cottage Club, Tiger Inn and Trustees of Princeton University formally begun in February 1979 and continuing to the present. These papers contain correspondence, draft manuscripts of and notes for an article on the Frank Case, copies of legal briefs and newspaper clippings relating to discrimination in general and the Frank case in particular.