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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Adlai E. Stevenson Papers document the public life of Adlai Stevenson (1900-1965), governor of Illinois, Democratic presidential candidate, and United Nations ambassador. The collection contains correspondence, speeches, writings, campaign materials, subject files, United Nations materials, personal files, photographs, and audiovisual materials, illuminating Stevenson's career in law, politics, and diplomacy, primarily from his first presidential campaign until his death in 1965.
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American civil liberties union
The American Civil Liberties Union Records, The Roger Baldwin years, document the activities of the ACLU from 1917 through 1950. The files contain materials on conscientious objection, freedom of speech, academic freedom, censorship, and labor concerns. The files reflect work on litigation, advocacy, and public policy. Materials include correspondence and newspaper clippings. Subgroup 1 has been digitized in its entirety and is available for members of the Princeton community to view here . To view the database from outside Princeton University, please see the Guide to the American Civil Liberties Union Records .
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American civil liberties union
This collection consists of the papers received and generated by the staff of the Washington, D.C. Office of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) during the 1950s and 1960s. The ACLU is a leading defender of civil liberties in the United States. Founded in 1920, it has been the recipient of sharp criticism for its willingness to defend unpopular causes and has participated in a majority of the landmark cases to come before the Supreme Court in the twentieth century. The Washington Office's primary responsibility is to monitor legislative issues. In the 1950s the office worked against abuses caused by McCarthyism, including loyalty oath requirements, powers of legislative investigating committees, and censorship of free speech and expression. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, the office focused on civil rights issues and the defense of alternative means of self expression. The Washington Office was also deeply involved with defending the civil liberties of those associated with the federal government and its agencies.
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Association on American Indian Affairs
The Records of the Association on American Indian Affairs document the corporate life of an influential and resilient player in the history of twentieth-century Native American advocacy. From its formation by non-Indians in New York in 1922 to its re-establishment in South Dakota in 1995 under a wholly Indian administration, the AAIA has defended the rights and promoted the welfare of Native Americans and, in this process, has shaped the views of their fellow citizens. The AAIA has waged innumerable battles over the years, touching on the material and spiritual well-being of Indians in every state of the Union: from the right of Native Americans to control their resources to their right to worship freely; from their right to federal trusteeship to their right to self-determination. The evolving nature of this struggle, in terms of conception and execution; the environment in which it was waged, both within and without the AAIA; the parade of men and women who figured in it; and the relationships among them can all be found in the abundant and insightful records which constitute these Records. The correspondence, minutes, reports, articles, clippings, and other documents in the collection, augmented by photographic and audiovisual material, represent a window not only on the AAIA but on the entities and personalities with which it interacted. While its vision has co-existed with others, and while it has been far from alone in its contribution to Indian life, no consideration of twentieth-century Native American affairs can disregard its arduous and, for the most part, fruitful work.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists of two groups of material collected by Ferree: 1) copies of government reports, resolutions, proclamations, statements, and clippings concerning foreign relations, the entry of the United States into World War I, and other varied issues during the administration of Woodrow Wilson.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists of selected papers of Thompson, including 27 scrapbooks of clippings (1884-1941) of his columns and articles written while he was a Washington correspondent, book reviewer, and editor of the New York Times (1899-1921) and, later, a writer in Philadelphia for the Public Ledger (1921-1922) and Commonweal (1930-1931).
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David Aiken Reed Papers, 1880-1953
MC100
4 boxes 1 folder

Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The papers of David Aiken Reed (1880-1953) consist primarily of clippings illustrating the political career of Pennsylvania Senator Reed (Class of 1900) during the years 1914-1940 with a few photographs of World War I campaigns, correspondence from President Herbert Hoover, the publisher Henry Luce and General John J. Pershing, Head of the American Expeditionary Forces of World War I, two letters of commendation, a testimonial, three army documents, and printed copies of a few speeches by Senator Reed.
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David A. Morse Papers, 1895-2003 (mostly 1942-1990)
MC097
124 boxes 1 folder 1 item

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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The David A. Morse Papers document the life and times of David Abner Morse (1907-1990), American lawyer, soldier, and public official. While he distinguished himself in legal, military, and governmental circles, the most fruitful years of his life were spent at the helm of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the oldest member of the United Nations' family of specialized agencies. As Director-General of the International Labour Office in Geneva from 1948 to 1970, Morse guided the increasingly complex activities of this tripartite organization, which unites in one body the representatives of workers, governments, and employers. No one has had a longer tenure as its head, and no one has presided over such far-reaching changes in its composition and orientation. Drawing on a variety of experiences in the field of domestic and international labor, including appointments as Assistant, Under, and Acting Secretary of Labor in the Truman administration, Morse gave practical meaning in a postwar context to the ILO's underlying philosophy, namely, that "universal and lasting peace can be established only if it is based upon social justice." The pursuit of this object won for the ILO the Nobel Peace Prize in 1969. The David Morse Papers contain correspondence, reports, memoranda, photographs, and newspaper clippings that document this long, productive career.
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Freedom House Records, 1933-2017
MC187
196 boxes 1 folder 6 items

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Freedom House U.S.
The Freedom House Records document the organization's activities in advocating freedom and democracy throughout the world. The records provide an invaluable insight into an organization that evolved from an answer to Hitler's Braunhaus to a diligent monitor of freedom worldwide.