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Student Christian Association (Princeton University).
The Student Christian Association and its predecessors were the dominant religious organizations at Princeton University for almost a hundred and fifty years. The Philadelphian Society, founded by a small group of students in 1825, was the quasi-official campus religious agency by the beginning of the twentieth century. In 1930 the Student-Faculty Association (SFA), organized by the Dean of the Chapel, took over the Society's programs, focusing on community service. In 1946 the Student Christian Association (SCA) replaced both the Society and the SFA, coordinating both religious and community service activities in campus. The Student Volunteers Council succeeded the SCA in 1967.
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Princeton University Society of the Claw.
The Society of the Claw Records describe the brief history of an organization created by the Class of 1894. Society members pledged to attend Princeton reunions annually, either for five-year periods or during their lifetimes. Members received a charm for their watch chains which included a genuine tiger claw to remind them of their pledge. The Society's principal long-term accomplishment was the proposal and subscription of the bronze stars placed on university dormitories in memory of World War I war dead.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The papers of Princeton University professor Harper Hubert Wilson document his interest and work in civil liberties. A self described "conservative, anarchist and socialist," Wilson provoked his students to think critically about the social problems confronting society, and to challenge the prevailing assumptions about American politics.
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Thomas Jefferson Wertenbaker Papers, 1910-1959
C0359
60 boxes 25.8 linear feet

Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Thomas Jefferson Wertenbaker was an American historian who taught at Princeton from 1910 to 1947. He was internationally recognized and wrote a number of important historical works. In 1947, he was president of the American Historical Association. His papers consist of Wertenbaker's works, correspondence, photographs, miscellaneous material, and printed matter.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Kurt Weitzmann left his native Germany in 1935 for Princeton where he spent the remainder of his life, at the Institute for Advanced Study as a permanent member (1935-1972) and as a professor in Princeton University's Dept. of Art and Archaeology (1945-1972). Included are personal and professional correspondence, related files, course outlines, lectures, manuscripts and notes for various published works, scrapbooks of clippings, and printed matter.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Papers of William R. Weeks, Esq., consist of three folders of material researched and correspondence written for the furtherance of a book on Princeton University's early history Weeks planned to write. The title of the book was to be, "History of the First Endowment of the College of New Jersey, now Princeton University." It is highly doubtful that the book was ever written; there is no copy of it on record.
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Everett S. Wallis Papers, 1935-1964
C0464
12 boxes 12.5 linear feet

Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
This collection consists of correspondence, reports, articles, lectures, notes, and printed matter of American chemist, Everett Stanley Wallis, dating primarily from his tenure as Princeton professor of chemistry (1930-1965) and chairman of its biochemical sciences program, and as a research consultant for Merck Co. of New Jersey and for other pharmaceutical companies.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Ira Owen Wade (Princeton Class of 1924) was a professor of French in Princeton's Department of Romance Languages and Literatures. His collection consists of typescript of his writings on Voltaire, professional correspondence, research notes, and some student work.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Jacob Viner (1892-1970) is considered one of the greatest economists of the twentieth century. His career was spent at the University of Chicago and Princeton University, and he also frequently served as an advisor to the United States government. His primary academic interests included international economics, international economic relations, and the history of economic thought, but his investigations ranged across many disciplines. Viner's papers document his scholarship, as well as his government service, and include correspondence, manuscripts, reports, and research materials.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Henry Van Dyke Family Papers consists of papers of three generations of the prominent Van Dyke family of New York and Princeton, beginning with Henry Jackson Van Dyke (1822-1891) and his wife, Henrietta [Ashmead] Van Dyke (1820-1893), followed by their children, Henry Van Dyke (1852-1933) and Paul Van Dyke (1859-1933), and ending with Henry van Dyke's son Tertius Van Dyke (1886-1958).