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Admission Office Records, 1854-2017 (mostly 1922-1998)
AC152
42 boxes 2 items 1 websites

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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Admission Office has determined who should be allowed to enroll as undergraduates at Princeton University since 1922. The actual composition and the desired composition of each class have been contentious campus issues since the introduction of selective admission. The debates over the value of recruiting and admitting alumni sons, war veterans, athletes, disadvantaged students (especially racial minorities), and women are reflected in the records of the Admission Office. This collection includes a number of reports and minutes, some of which are restricted, news clippings and releases about Princeton admission, historical materials, and a series of Admission Office publications.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
In January 1969, Princeton's trustees voted to make the undergraduate college coeducational, breaking the 224-year tradition of an all-male student body. The Patterson Committee, made up of faculty and administrators, had studied and advocated the change. The one dissenting voice on the committee was Arthur J. Horton '42, the university's director of development; he wrote a minority report and became a rallying point for those opposing the move. Horton's collection of materials on coeducation contains his annotated copy of the committee's report, his memoranda to the committee's chair and university administrators, official university releases and letters to alumni, and newspaper clippings regarding the change and campus issues in general. A quarter of the collection is letters from alumni, some welcoming coeducation but most strongly opposed.
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Princeton University. Bicentennial Celebration Committee.
The Princeton University Bicentennial Celebration was a year-long series of events that began on September 22, 1946 with a sermon delivered by Geoffrey Francis Fisher, Lord Archbishop of Canterbury, in the University Chapel and ended with an address by President Truman in front of Nassau Hall at the June 17, 1947 Concluding Bicentennial Convocation. The Bicentennial Celebration Records contain correspondence, writings, speeches, press-releases, pamphlets, reports, newspaper clippings, tickets, transcripts, watercolor and pencil sketches and various other materials documenting the 1946-1947 Princeton University Bicentennial Celebration.
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Princeton University. Committee on the Education of Women at Princeton.
The Committee on the Education of Women at Princeton Records contain the working papers and correspondence of Gardner Patterson, Committee Chair, and his assistants. In June 1967 the Board of Trustees charged the Committee with the study of "the advisability and feasibility" of enlarging the University's role in the education of women. The final report, "The Education of Women at Princeton," was submitted to the Trustees in July 1968. Adopting the recommendation of the Committee, they voted in favor of coeducation the following January and appointed an Ad-Hoc Committee to advise on how to implement their decision. The collection contains some papers Patterson received as a member of this Ad-Hoc Committee, and drafts of its final report, "The Education of Undergraduate Women at Princeton: An Examination of Coordinate Versus Coeducational Patterns."
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Princeton University. Council of the Princeton University Community.
The Council of the Princeton University Community (CPUC) was born out of the Special Committee on the Structure of the University established by President Robert F. Goheen in May 1968. CPUC is primarily a deliberative and consultative body, with the authority to "consider and investigate" university policy, governance, and any general issue related to the welfare of the University. Much of the work of the Council takes place through its standing committees: the Executive Committee, the Committee on Rights and Rules, the Committee on Governance, the Committee on Priorities, the Committee on Resources, and the Judicial Committee.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
J. Douglas Brown (1898-1986) was an economist and Princeton University administrator who was an expert in the field of industrial relations, especially on the subjects of Social Security and personnel and manpower issues. He was one of the leaders in the development of the Social Security program and also served in the War Department during World War II on manpower issues. Brown's papers document his career as a government consultant, as a scholar, and as a university administrator and include his correspondence and writings, reports, meeting minutes, notes, and publications.
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Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
The Office of General Counsel, established in 1972, provides legal counsel to officers and departments of the University, and serves as legal representative for the University in litigation, administrative matters, and transactions. The records contain correspondence, memoranda, interview transcripts, administrative material relating to the Office of General Counsel and other departments, legal documents, grant and tax reports, legal briefs, affidavits, depositions, as well as litigation material involving estates, trusts, gifts, University employees, and various individuals and corporations.
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Phi Beta Kappa Records, 1896-1969
AC034
3 boxes 1 folder

Phi Beta Kappa. New Jersey Beta (Princeton University).
The Princeton University Phi Beta Kappa Records consist of correspondence, reports, minutes, and other materials relating to the administration, membership, and finances of this organization.
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American Whig-Cliosophic Society
The American Whig-Cliosophic Society (1941-present) is a literary, political and debating society which has had an important impact on the lives of generations of Princeton students. It provides students with both social alternatives and an opportunity to develop skills not emphasized by the University curriculum. The contents of the initial group of records were acquired between 1941 and 1993 in agreements between Princeton University and the American Whig-Cliosophic Society. The library initially cataloged some of these records into the P Collection. Subsequently, an attempt was made to organize some of these records in 1975.
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Student Christian Association (Princeton University).
The Student Christian Association and its predecessors were the dominant religious organizations at Princeton University for almost a hundred and fifty years. The Philadelphian Society, founded by a small group of students in 1825, was the quasi-official campus religious agency by the beginning of the twentieth century. In 1930 the Student-Faculty Association (SFA), organized by the Dean of the Chapel, took over the Society's programs, focusing on community service. In 1946 the Student Christian Association (SCA) replaced both the Society and the SFA, coordinating both religious and community service activities in campus. The Student Volunteers Council succeeded the SCA in 1967.