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Start Over You searched for: Subject Speeches. Remove constraint Subject: Speeches. Genre Terms Photographs. Remove constraint Genre Terms: Photographs. Place United States -- Foreign relations -- 20th century. Remove constraint Place: United States -- Foreign relations -- 20th century.

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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Allen W. Dulles Papers contains correspondence, speeches, writings, and photographs documenting the life of this lawyer, diplomat, businessman, and spy. One of the longest-serving directors of the Central Intelligence Agency (1953-1961), he also served in a key intelligence post in Bern, Switzerland during World War II, as well as on the Warren Commission.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The George W. Ball papers document Ball's career as a lawyer, diplomat, investment banker and author. His involvement in Democratic politics, including his time spent on the presidential campaigns of Adlai Stevenson and his service as undersecretary of state for John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson is well documented, as is his often overlooked role with Jean Monnet in European integration.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Harlan Cleveland (1918-2008) was a public administrator, ambassador to NATO, and a political scientist. He served in several positions related to the administration of economic aid programs during the 1940s, as an assistant secretary in the State Department and as U.S. ambassador to NATO during the 1960s, and also held positions at three universities and the Aspen Institute. Cleveland's papers document his government service and his work at the Aspen Institute, and include his speech and writings files, as well as correspondence and photographs.
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Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
The Roger Nash Baldwin Papers document the life and career of Roger Baldwin (1884-1981), a prominent and active American civil libertarian for almost all of his prodigiously long life. Baldwin is remembered first and foremost as a founder of the American Civil Liberties Union. Many of the papers in this collection document his involvement with the conscientious objection movement that served as the forerunner to the ACLU and with the Union itself. He served as both its executive director from its foundation in 1920 to his retirement in 1950 and as an advisor from that date until his death in 1981. However, Baldwin cast his net much wider than just the ACLU. During the 1920s and 1930s, he was involved with various left-wing political organizations, including the Industrial Workers of the World. Following the end of World War II, he served as an advisor to the U.S. Army and the United Nations in Germany, Austria, Japan, and Korea, guiding the establishment of democracy in those countries, and he was for many years chair of the International League for the Rights of Man. He spoke and wrote widely, most often on issues of civil liberties and human rights, and also taught periodically throughout his life. The papers, which include correspondence, memos, writings, notes, and photographs, document all aspects of his public life, as well as some portion of his personal life.