Abigail Klionsky Oral History Collection On Jewish Student Life At Princeton, 1979 2014 (Mostly 2013 2014)

Princeton University Archives

Princeton University Archives

Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library
Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library
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Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Abigail Klionsky is a member of the Princeton University undergraduate Class of 2014 who undertook an oral history project on Jewish student life at Princeton as part of her senior thesis. The collection consists of fifteen transcripts of Klionsky's interviews with Jewish alumni and also includes a copy of a transcript of Henry Morgenthau III's interview with David Frisch in 1979.
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Zielenziger describes his upbringing as a conservative Jew and his religious experiences as an undergraduate student. He provides details of his involvement with Jewish matters particularly in the solicitation of funds for the establishment of a kosher dining facility in Stevenson Hall. Other events mentioned are the Yom Kippur War and its effect on campus, Young Israel's contribution to Kosher dining, and rabbinical influences on the structure of religious services.
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Savit, a member of one of the first classes of women admitted to Princeton, discusses her experience as a conservative Jewish student at the University. Savit addresses her role in organizing kosher meals along with Marilyn Schlacter at Wilson College and in changing course registration policies that interfered with religious observance. Other topics mentioned are the admission process during the early days of co-education, participation at the Yavneh House, and other Jewish activities on campus as well as the opening of Stevenson Hall.
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Adelstein discusses his upbringing in New York City and his participation in Jewish life at Princeton, particularly his position as president of Hillel. He mentions his role at the Interclub Committee meeting that secured bicker bids for students in 1955, his attendance of Jewish religious services, and his observance of Jewish traditions including putting on Tefillin.
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Sandler describes his upbringing in Portland, Maine and his involvement at the university including serving as vice president of Hillel and providing awareness of the bicker process to his fellow Jewish classmates. Sandler lists anecdotes of a number of famous classmates including literary theorist Edward Said, real estate magnate David Mandelbaum, and Lee Macht, a well-known psychiatrist. Other topics of discussion including the banning of Jews from certain communities, the grading system, and compulsory chapel.
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Karafiol, a Holocaust survivor provides details about growing up in a secular home despite his mother's Orthodox background. He provides details of his parents' political involvement with left wing groups like the Bundists and how moving to different countries during World War II influenced his life as a student at Princeton. Other topics discussed are Karafiol's friendship with other students including Paul Sigler from the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrated Genomics, and the lack of participation in Jewish activities.
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Rubenstein talks about his Jewish upbringing in Brooklyn and provides details about student life in the post-war period. Some of the topics addressed are dormitory arrangements, anti-Semitism in the eating clubs, and admission quotas for Jewish students. Rubenstein also provides anecdotes about Daniel Polisar, provost of Shalem College, and Dick Kazmaier '52, a Heisman trophy winner.
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Morgenthau discusses his upbringing including attendance to a prep school, his non-religious household and his parents' involvement with the Henry Street Settlement and a poker club that included Arthur Hays Sulzberger, the publisher of the New York Times. The interview addresses tensions among German and Eastern European Jews and the exclusion of Jews in various social circles. Individuals mentioned include LeCorbusier; Morgenthau's friend, Jerry Straus, heir to Macy's department store; and Albert Einstein.
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David Frisch '40, the son of a southern rabbi in Galveston, Texas, tells of his experiences as a Jewish student at Princeton in the 1930s, particularly his involvement in leading Jewish services at Murray Dodge along with Joseph Schein '37 during the compulsory chapel requirement. Frisch also provides details about the Galveston Movement, which diverted Jewish immigration to the American South. Prominent individuals mentioned in the interview include Jacob Schiff, who led the Galveston movement, Erwin Panofsky, Roy Dickinson Welch, and Albert Einstein. Other topics of discussion include participation in eating clubs, places of employment and dating.
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Grielsheimer talks about his experiences with the bicker process of 1957 and 1958 as both a participant of the process and as a member of the Bicker Committee. He attributes the creation of the residential college system to the bicker controversy and discusses his efforts as Hillel president to get outside Jewish agencies involved, and, furthermore, to tackle racial issues at the university. Also mentioned in the interview are his participation in Whig-Clio, his relationship with other Jewish students and contemporary issues including racial integration in the east side of Manhattan and the severity of polio.