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Whitney Jennings Oates Correspondence, 1949-1959
C0871
7 boxes 2.8 linear feet

Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists primarily of correspondence of Whitney Jennings Oates (Princeton Class of 1925) during his tenure as a professor of Classics at Princeton University.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Papaioannou was born in Lamia and grew up in Athens (Greece). She began working as a photographer during the 1930s, concentrating at first on studies of landscapes, monuments and archaeological exhibits. The outbreak of war in 1940 marked a turning point in her career, as she was intensely affected by the suffering of the civilian population of Athens. Realizing the power of her camera to arouse people's conscience, she documented the troops departing for the front, the preparations for the war effort, and the care received by the first casualties. When the capital was in the grip of starvation, she revealed the horrors of war in her moving photographs of emaciated children. After the liberation, as a member of the photographic unit of UNRRA (United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration), she toured the ravaged Greek countryside recording the difficult living conditions faced by its inhabitants. She often exceeded her brief, immortalizing the faces and personal stories of ordinary people in photographs that stressed dignity rather than suffering. During the 1950s Papaioannou's work expressed the optimism that prevailed in the aftermath of the war with respect to both the future of mankind and the restoration of traditional values. Nevertheless, her photographs of the historic Greek landscape are not in the least romantic, but instead portray it as harsh, barren, drenched in light, and its inhabitants proud and independent, despite their poverty. Voula Papaioannou's work represents the trend towards "humanitarian photography" that resulted from the abuse of human rights during the war. Her camera captured her compatriots' struggle for survival with respect, clarity, and a degree of personal involvement that transcends national boundaries and reinforces one's faith in the strength of the common man and the intrinsic value of human life. (http://www.benaki.gr/index.asp?id=1020103=en) Consists of an open collection of Papaiōannou photographs.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists of 10 pairs of stereoscopic images (mostly 7.4 x 7.1 cm.) of Athens by the Neue Photographische Gesellschaft A.G. [New Photographic Society], ca. 1905 .
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Spyros Meletzēs (January 20, 1906 to November 14, 2003) was a Greek photographer, born in the village of Saint Theodore in Imvros. He was the eldest son (of six siblings) of Menelaos and Kalliopē Giannakēs. He attended the "Boarding" and his family intended him to be a priest. The death of his father in 1919, when Meletzēs was 13 year old, forced him to breadwinner. In 1923, at age 17 (Treaty of Lausanne - the concession of Imbros to the Turks) he moved to Alexandroupolis, where he worked at a draper shop and later at the photographic studio of Alexandros Panagiōtou, who was a relative of Meletzēs. A landmark in his photographic career was his photograph of the boats on the beach of Alexandroupolis for which he won the first prize in the exhibition of Thessalonikē in 1924. In 1927 he moved to Athens. He studied photography with George Bouka - photographer of the royal family. In 1937 he photographed the Greek countryside in Epirus. During the Resistance in 1940 he follows and takes pictures of the rebels in Peloponnese and Eurytania. Meletzēs is considered the photographer of Greek Resistance. After the World War II he continues to take photographs of archaeological sites and museums and in the 1950s a lot of politicians and perosnalities of art. In 1953 his work presented and took honours in Rochester, Birmingham, and Buenos Aires. In 1955 he signs a contract with the Greek government and takes photographs of public works in Hevros. In 1957 he works as a photographer for the Ministry of Transport and Public Works and tours taking photographs throughout Greece (from Peloponnesus, Rumelē to Thrace) [http://el.wikipedia.org]. Consists of an open collection of photographs by Meletzēs.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
German Semitic philologist, Rudolf-Ernst Brünnow (1858-1917) was a professor of Semitics at Princeton (post-1910) in Greek, Latin, German, French, Turkish, Assyrian, and English. The collection consists of notes, photographs, inscriptions, tables, and descriptions by Brünnow.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Richard Halliburton traveled extensively in the first part of twentieth century after graduating from Princeton University in 1921. The collection contains autograph and typescript drafts of seven of Halliburton's books, short stories, essays, school notes, and other travel memorabilia, as well as Halliburton's correspondence with his parents and others, research materials about Rupert Brooke, and a significant group of photographs documenting his travels throughout Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Philippos Margaritēs studied painting in Rome and taught drawing in Athens. Around 1846 he met Philibert Perraud in Athens, where Perraud taught him photography. Margaritēs thereafter established the first photography studio in Greece, based out of his house, where he photographed Athens' high society. He was active as a photographer from the early 1850s until around 1863. Margaritēs specialized in portraits and topographical views. He was believed to have taught his drawing students about the principles of photography, but he did not instruct them in the practical darkroom techniques. In addition to daguerreotypes, Margaritēs produced salt prints and albumen prints and also made cartes-de-visite [http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artMakerDetails?maker=1739]. Consists of an open collection of photographs by Greece's first professional photographer, Philippos Margaritēs.