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Start Over You searched for: Collector Princeton University. Library. Special Collections Remove constraint Collector: Princeton University. Library. Special Collections Date range 1990 to 1999 Remove constraint Date range: <span class="from" data-blrl-begin="1990">1990</span> to <span class="to" data-blrl-end="1999">1999</span>

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Collection
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Kostas Zēmerēs was born in 1886 in Katēchōri Pelion. He studied at the Commercial School of Volos, where he took his first lessons from the painter Iōannēs Poulakas. In 1904 he went to the United States where he worked in photo labs collaborating with painters and photographers. There he had the opportunity to study at the Art Institute of Saint Louis. He returned to Greece in 1912 where he was recruited during the Balkan Wars. Later, after the World War I, he remained in Athens working with great photographers, such as George Bouka and Nelly's. Finally he returned to Volos where he worked as a professional photographer and painter. He participated in many exhibitions in Greece and abroad, such as in Calais (France) in 1925 and Liverpoool (England) in 1926. He received the gold medal at the International Exhibition of Thessalonikē (Greece) in 1932 and 1936. Zēmerēs gave us the unique photographs of the painter Theophilos Chatzēmichaēl. He died at the age of 96. Consists of an open collection of silver prints depicting Greek landscapes by Kōstas Zēmerēs.
Collection
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists chiefly of selected autograph letters and notes of the American-born, England-based painter and etcher James McNeill Whistler addressed to his friend Jonathan Sturges, Princeton Class of 1885, the majority of which relates to the affair of the "Baronet and the Butterfly," a public scandal which concerned an oil portrait of Lady Eden.
Collection
Online
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Princeton has participated in intercollegiate rowing contests since 1874. The collection consists of photographs, memorabilia, scrapbooks, programs, correspondence and posters documenting the history of the Princeton University rowing program.
Collection
Online
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Princeton Scientific Expeditions Collection brings together original materials from the university archives that document the work of various scientific expeditions conducted under the aegis of Princeton University and its corporate predecessors. The connection with the university ranges from enterprises duly authorized in the trustees' minutes to expeditionary tasks that happen to have been carried out by members of the university faculty, often with little official notice of Princeton as an institution.
Collection
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Papaioannou was born in Lamia and grew up in Athens (Greece). She began working as a photographer during the 1930s, concentrating at first on studies of landscapes, monuments and archaeological exhibits. The outbreak of war in 1940 marked a turning point in her career, as she was intensely affected by the suffering of the civilian population of Athens. Realizing the power of her camera to arouse people's conscience, she documented the troops departing for the front, the preparations for the war effort, and the care received by the first casualties. When the capital was in the grip of starvation, she revealed the horrors of war in her moving photographs of emaciated children. After the liberation, as a member of the photographic unit of UNRRA (United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration), she toured the ravaged Greek countryside recording the difficult living conditions faced by its inhabitants. She often exceeded her brief, immortalizing the faces and personal stories of ordinary people in photographs that stressed dignity rather than suffering. During the 1950s Papaioannou's work expressed the optimism that prevailed in the aftermath of the war with respect to both the future of mankind and the restoration of traditional values. Nevertheless, her photographs of the historic Greek landscape are not in the least romantic, but instead portray it as harsh, barren, drenched in light, and its inhabitants proud and independent, despite their poverty. Voula Papaioannou's work represents the trend towards "humanitarian photography" that resulted from the abuse of human rights during the war. Her camera captured her compatriots' struggle for survival with respect, clarity, and a degree of personal involvement that transcends national boundaries and reinforces one's faith in the strength of the common man and the intrinsic value of human life. (http://www.benaki.gr/index.asp?id=1020103&lang=en) Consists of an open collection of Papaiōannou photographs.
Collection
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Eugene O'Neill, the celebrated American playwright, was a director of the Provincetown Players and a founder of the Theatre Guild. He won the Pulitzer Prize for Strange Interlude (1928) and, posthumously, for Long Day's Journey Into Night (1956). The collection consists of fifteen manuscripts of O'Neill, most of which are first drafts of plays and include preliminary notes.