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Association of Latino Princeton Alumni Records, 1974-2017
AC227
1 box 83 digital files 1 websites

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Association of Latino Princeton Alumni
The Association of Latino Princeton Alumni was formed in 1989 with the dual mission of supporting and enhancing the role and presence of Latinos at all levels within the University as well as forming a network of Latino alumni. The collection documents the origins and development of the Association of Latino Princeton Alumni and contains minutes, board documents, correspondence, campaign materials for a Latino Studies program, and the organization's public website.
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Association of Princeton Puerto Rican Alumni
The Association of Princeton Puerto Rican Alumni or APPRA was formed in September 1982 to assist in increasing the recruitment and admissions of Puerto Rican students to the university, and to encourage a thriving Puerto Rican community on campus. This collection consists of paper and digital records including: financial records, bylaws, recruitment material, and correspondence.
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Association on American Indian Affairs
The Records of the Association on American Indian Affairs document the corporate life of an influential and resilient player in the history of twentieth-century Native American advocacy. From its formation by non-Indians in New York in 1922 to its re-establishment in South Dakota in 1995 under a wholly Indian administration, the AAIA has defended the rights and promoted the welfare of Native Americans and, in this process, has shaped the views of their fellow citizens. The AAIA has waged innumerable battles over the years, touching on the material and spiritual well-being of Indians in every state of the Union: from the right of Native Americans to control their resources to their right to worship freely; from their right to federal trusteeship to their right to self-determination. The evolving nature of this struggle, in terms of conception and execution; the environment in which it was waged, both within and without the AAIA; the parade of men and women who figured in it; and the relationships among them can all be found in the abundant and insightful records which constitute these Records. The correspondence, minutes, reports, articles, clippings, and other documents in the collection, augmented by photographic and audiovisual material, represent a window not only on the AAIA but on the entities and personalities with which it interacted. While its vision has co-existed with others, and while it has been far from alone in its contribution to Indian life, no consideration of twentieth-century Native American affairs can disregard its arduous and, for the most part, fruitful work.