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American civil liberties union
The ACLU is the preeminent civil liberties organization in the United States. These records document the work of their national office in the areas of civil rights, children and women's rights, freedom of speech (and all First Amendment questions), and due process, among many others, predominantly from 1970 to 2000.
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American civil liberties union
This collection consists of the papers received and generated by the staff of the Washington, D.C. Office of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) during the 1950s and 1960s. The ACLU is a leading defender of civil liberties in the United States. Founded in 1920, it has been the recipient of sharp criticism for its willingness to defend unpopular causes and has participated in a majority of the landmark cases to come before the Supreme Court in the twentieth century. The Washington Office's primary responsibility is to monitor legislative issues. In the 1950s the office worked against abuses caused by McCarthyism, including loyalty oath requirements, powers of legislative investigating committees, and censorship of free speech and expression. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, the office focused on civil rights issues and the defense of alternative means of self expression. The Washington Office was also deeply involved with defending the civil liberties of those associated with the federal government and its agencies.
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American Committee for Devastated France
The American Committee for Devastated France collection contains the annual reports, promotional pamphlets and minutes of this post-World War I relief organization. Newspaper clippings and routine correspondence between the group's treasurer and other staff members are also included in the collection.
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Americans United for Separation of Church and State
The organization that became Americans United for Separation of Church and State was founded in 1947 to protect church-state separation and religious freedom, as well as to educate lawmakers, religious leaders, and the general public regarding Constitutional religious liberties. The records document the administration and issues of the organization from its founding and include correspondence, meeting materials, and publications.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Anne Martindell was one of the first three women to serve in the New Jersey State Senate. After her four-year term ended in 1977, she served as director of the Office for Foreign Disaster Assistance, and was ambassador to New Zealand and Western Samoa for a two-year term. The papers document her career in politics and civil service, and also contain her unpublished memoirs and personal papers.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Ann Whitman (1908-1991) was personal secretary to President Dwight D. Eisenhower during both of his administrations and later served as chief of staff to Vice President Nelson A. Rockefeller. Whitman's Papers on John Foster Dulles consist of photocopies of a portion of Whitman's files concerning secretaries of state John Foster Dulles and Christian A. Herter. The majority of the files consist of correspondence of John Foster Dulles, often with President Eisenhower or United States government officials, and also include a small amount of similar material of Christian A. Herter.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Professor Ansley J. Coale (1917-2002) was a demographer whose work focused on nuptiality, fertility, and mortality in several countries. Coale joined the Princeton University faculty in 1947 and spent his entire career as a member of the university's Office of Population Research (OPR). The papers contain correspondence, Coale's research papers and projects, and samples of data collected. The material spans the several decades (1950s to 1990s) Coale spent as a member of the Princeton faculty, as well as the work he did during his retirement.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Arnold A. Rogow (1924-2006) was a political scientist, author, and psychotherapist. His main area of research was psychological explanations for politics, especially the decision-making of leaders, notably James Forrestal and Alexander Hamilton. The Rogow Papers are composed of materials he collected for his book James Forrestal: A Study of Personality, Politics, and Policy (The Macmillan Press: New York, 1963) and include correspondence with individuals who knew Forrestal, Rogow's notes, and other research materials.
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Arthur Bullard Papers, 1905-1929
MC008
12 boxes 1 folder

Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Papers of Arthur Bullard (1879-1929), journalist and statesman, chronicle the major world political and economic events relating to World War I and its aftermath. Although the bulk of the material concerns Russia and Western Europe, there are writings on political events in North Africa, Central America, and East Asia as well. The collection includes copies and originals of newspaper and magazine articles, manuscripts of several novels, travel books, and political volumes, memorandum, and correspondence, most of which was written by Bullard. There is also a file of photographs and post cards.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Arthur Cyrus Warner (1918-2007) was a prominent figure in the gay liberation movement, focusing his efforts on legal reform to protect the civil liberties of the gay community. Warner's papers document his involvement in legal reform and other issues pertaining to gay rights. The papers largely consist of legislative and court documents about cases affecting gay civil liberties, and related memoranda, correspondence, and writings.