Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Genre Terms Correspondence. Remove constraint Genre Terms: Correspondence. Names Public Policy Papers Remove constraint Names: Public Policy Papers

Search Results

collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Adlai E. Stevenson Papers document the public life of Adlai Stevenson (1900-1965), governor of Illinois, Democratic presidential candidate, and United Nations ambassador. The collection contains correspondence, speeches, writings, campaign materials, subject files, United Nations materials, personal files, photographs, and audiovisual materials, illuminating Stevenson's career in law, politics, and diplomacy, primarily from his first presidential campaign until his death in 1965.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Albert O. Hirschman (1915- ) was a leading scholar in the field of economic development whose work focused on Latin America but encompassed the globe. He was a professor at Yale, Columbia, Harvard, and the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. Hirschman's papers document his scholarship on economic development and his academic career and include his correspondence written while he was at the Institute for Advanced Study, his writings, and his research notes and materials, especially related to his work in Latin America and for the World Bank.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Alfred J. Lotka (1880-1949), a statistician for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, was a significant contributor to the field of demography. He was a pioneer in the study of population dynamics and conducted research on the mathematical theory of evolution and the mathematical analysis of populations. Lotka's papers document his scholarship and his involvement in professional organizations and include drafts of his works, his notes and research materials, and correspondence.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Allen Macy Dulles, son of Clover Todd and Allen Welsh Dulles, was a student of history and politics with plans for a career in public service until he sustained a serious injury in the Korean War. The collection consists of correspondence between family members prior to and following Allen Macy Dulles' injury as a Marine lieutenant in the Korean War.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Allen W. Dulles Papers contains correspondence, speeches, writings, and photographs documenting the life of this lawyer, diplomat, businessman, and spy. One of the longest-serving directors of the Central Intelligence Agency (1953-1961), he also served in a key intelligence post in Bern, Switzerland during World War II, as well as on the Warren Commission.
collection icon

Allen W. Dulles Papers: Digital Files Series, 1939-1977
MC019-09
50 items 1878 digital files

online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Allen W. Dulles (1893-1969), though a diplomat and lawyer, was renowned for his role in shaping United States intelligence operations, including the longest service as director of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). The Allen W. Dulles Digital Files contain scanned images of professional correspondence, reports, lectures, and administrative papers, declassified and released by the CIA in 2007. The collection spans Dulles's time as Chief of the Office of Strategic Services office in Bern, Switzerland during World War II, his work at the Central Intelligence Agency, and his retirement.
collection icon
American Association for the Advancement of the Humanities
The American Association for the Advancement of the Humanities (AAAH) operated from 1979 until 1982. The AAAH was a general membership organization which supported the humanities in the United States through its involved in legislation, conferences, and producing the monthly publication Humanities Report. The AAAH's records document the administration of the association and include correspondence, board minutes, financial records, and materials on Humanities Report.
collection icon

American Civil Liberties Union Records, 1864-2011 (mostly 1917-1995)
MC001
4207.37 linear feet 5727 boxes 1886 Volumes 288 Reels

American civil liberties union
The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is the pre-eminent civil liberties organization in the United States, utilizing litigation, lobbying, and public education to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution. These records document the administration and work of the ACLU's national office, regional offices, and legal projects, with particular emphasis on the areas of civil rights, children and women's rights, freedom of speech (and all First Amendment questions), and due process, among many others. The records include case files, correspondence, meeting minutes, research files, and files of staff members. Portions of the records (Subgroup 1; Subgroup 2, Series 2, 3, and 4; Subgroup 3, Subseries 5B) have been digitized and are available for members of the Princeton community to view here . To view the database from outside Princeton University, please see the Guide to the American Civil Liberties Union Records .
collection icon
online icon
American civil liberties union
The American Civil Liberties Union Records, The Roger Baldwin years, document the activities of the ACLU from 1917 through 1950. The files contain materials on conscientious objection, freedom of speech, academic freedom, censorship, and labor concerns. The files reflect work on litigation, advocacy, and public policy. Materials include correspondence and newspaper clippings. Subgroup 1 has been digitized in its entirety and is available for members of the Princeton community to view here . To view the database from outside Princeton University, please see the Guide to the American Civil Liberties Union Records .
collection icon
American civil liberties union
The American Civil Liberties Union Records document the activities of the Union in protecting individual rights from 1920 through 1995. The files contain materials on freedom of speech, expression, and association; due process of law; equality before the law; legal case files; and organizational records. Within these categories files reflect subject areas such as academic freedom, censorship, racial discrimination, aliens' rights, privacy concerns, labor concerns, amnesty, and government loyalty and security. The files reflect work on litigation, advocacy and public policy, and subject files on various areas of interest connected with civil liberties. Materials include correspondence, court documents, memoranda, printed matter, minutes, reports, briefs, and legal files. Also included are materials from ACLU affiliate organizations, and the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee. Subgroup 2, Series 2, 3, and 4 have been digitized and are available for members of the Princeton community to view here . To view the database from outside Princeton University, please see the Guide to the American Civil Liberties Union Records .
collection icon
online icon
American civil liberties union
The American Civil Liberties Union Records document the activities of the Union in protecting individual rights from 1920 through 1995. The files contain materials on freedom of speech, expression, and association; due process of law; equality before the law; legal case files; and organizational records. Within these categories files reflect subject areas such as academic freedom, censorship, racial discrimination, aliens' rights, privacy concerns, labor concerns, amnesty, and government loyalty and security. The files reflect work on litigation, advocacy and public policy, and subject files on various areas of interest connected with civil liberties. Materials include correspondence, court documents, memoranda, printed matter, minutes, reports, briefs, and legal files. Also included are materials from ACLU affiliate organizations, and the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee.
collection icon
online icon
American civil liberties union
The American Civil Liberties Union Records document the activities of the Union in protecting individual rights from 1920 through 1995. The files contain materials on freedom of speech, expression, and association; due process of law; equality before the law; legal case files; and organizational records. Within these categories files reflect subject areas such as academic freedom, censorship, racial discrimination, aliens' rights, privacy concerns, labor concerns, amnesty, and government loyalty and security. The files reflect work on litigation, advocacy and public policy, and subject files on various areas of interest connected with civil liberties. Materials include correspondence, court documents, memoranda, printed matter, minutes, reports, briefs, and legal files. Also included are materials from ACLU affiliate organizations, and the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee. Subgroup 2, Series 4 has been digitized and is available for members of the Princeton community to view here . To view the database from outside Princeton University, please see the Guide to the American Civil Liberties Union Records .
collection icon
online icon
American civil liberties union
The American Civil Liberties Union Records document the activities of the Union in protecting individual rights from 1920 through 1995. The files contain materials on freedom of speech, expression, and association; due process of law; equality before the law; legal case files; and organizational records. Within these categories files reflect subject areas such as academic freedom, censorship, racial discrimination, aliens' rights, privacy concerns, labor concerns, amnesty, and government loyalty and security. The files reflect work on litigation, advocacy and public policy, and subject files on various areas of interest connected with civil liberties. Materials include correspondence, court documents, memoranda, printed matter, minutes, reports, briefs, and legal files. Also included are materials from ACLU affiliate organizations, and the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee.
collection icon
online icon
American civil liberties union
The American Civil Liberties Union Records document the activities of the Union in protecting individual rights from 1920 through 1995. The files contain materials on freedom of speech, expression, and association; due process of law; equality before the law; legal case files; and organizational records. Within these categories files reflect subject areas such as academic freedom, censorship, racial discrimination, aliens' rights, privacy concerns, labor concerns, amnesty, and government loyalty and security. The files reflect work on litigation, advocacy and public policy, and subject files on various areas of interest connected with civil liberties. Materials include correspondence, court documents, memoranda, printed matter, minutes, reports, briefs, and legal files. Also included are materials from ACLU affiliate organizations, and the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee.
collection icon
online icon
American civil liberties union
The American Civil Liberties Union Records document the activities of the Union in protecting individual rights from 1920 through 1995. The files contain materials on freedom of speech, expression, and association; due process of law; equality before the law; legal case files; and organizational records. Within these categories files reflect subject areas such as academic freedom, censorship, racial discrimination, aliens' rights, privacy concerns, labor concerns, amnesty, and government loyalty and security. The files reflect work on litigation, advocacy and public policy, and subject files on various areas of interest connected with civil liberties. Materials include correspondence, court documents, memoranda, printed matter, minutes, reports, briefs, and legal files. Also included are materials from ACLU affiliate organizations, and the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee. Subgroup 2, Series 2 has been digitized and is available for members of the Princeton community to view here . To view the database from outside Princeton University, please see the Guide to the American Civil Liberties Union Records .
collection icon
online icon
American civil liberties union
The American Civil Liberties Union Records document the activities of the Union in protecting individual rights from 1920 through 1995. The files contain materials on freedom of speech, expression, and association; due process of law; equality before the law; legal case files; and organizational records. Within these categories files reflect subject areas such as academic freedom, censorship, racial discrimination, aliens' rights, privacy concerns, labor concerns, amnesty, and government loyalty and security. The files reflect work on litigation, advocacy and public policy, and subject files on various areas of interest connected with civil liberties. Materials include correspondence, court documents, memoranda, printed matter, minutes, reports, briefs, and legal files. Also included are materials from ACLU affiliate organizations, and the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee. Subgroup 2, Series 3 has been digitized and is available for members of the Princeton community to view here . To view the database from outside Princeton University, please see the Guide to the American Civil Liberties Union Records .
collection icon
American civil liberties union
The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is the pre-eminent civil liberties organization in the United States, utilizing litigation, lobbying, and public education to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution. These records document the administration and work of the ACLU's national office, regional offices, and legal projects, with particular emphasis on the areas of civil rights, children and women's rights, freedom of speech (and all First Amendment questions), and due process, among many others. The records include case files, correspondence, meeting minutes, research files, and files of staff members. Subgroup 3, Subseries 5B (Southern Regional Office) has been digitized and is available for members of the Princeton community to view here . To view the database from outside Princeton University, please see the Guide to the American Civil Liberties Union Records .
collection icon
American civil liberties union
The Organizational Matters series documents the administration of the ACLU National Office and their interactions with the regional offices, affiliates, outside organizations, and the general public. The records include committee meeting minutes and mailings, staff files, and department records. The majority of the records are the files of Executive Director Ira Glasser and the records of the Legal Department.
collection icon
online icon
American civil liberties union
The Project Files series contains the records of twelve of the ACLU's projects, which each addressed an area of civil liberties violations. Project records typically consist of case files, research files, and project publicity and correspondence. The best documented projects are the Children's Rights Project and Women's Rights Project, and to a lesser extent the Arts Censorship Project, Capital Punishment Project, and Reproductive Freedom Project.
collection icon
online icon
American civil liberties union
The Regional Offices series documents the work and administration of the ACLU's three regional offices: Mountain States Regional Office, concerned with civil rights in the west and Native American rights, the Southern Regional Office, focusing on civil rights in the south, and the Washington, D.C. office, which concentrates on national legislation and the actions of the federal government. The files include correspondence, case files, office publications, research files, and the papers of individual staff members. Subgroup 3, Subseries 5B (Southern Regional Office) has been digitized and is available for members of the Princeton community to view here . To view the database from outside Princeton University, please see the Guide to the American Civil Liberties Union Records .
collection icon
online icon
American civil liberties union
The ACLU is the preeminent civil liberties organization in the United States. These records document the work of their national office in the areas of civil rights, children and women's rights, freedom of speech (and all First Amendment questions), and due process, among many others, predominantly from 1970 to 2000.
collection icon
American civil liberties union
This collection consists of the papers received and generated by the staff of the Washington, D.C. Office of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) during the 1950s and 1960s. The ACLU is a leading defender of civil liberties in the United States. Founded in 1920, it has been the recipient of sharp criticism for its willingness to defend unpopular causes and has participated in a majority of the landmark cases to come before the Supreme Court in the twentieth century. The Washington Office's primary responsibility is to monitor legislative issues. In the 1950s the office worked against abuses caused by McCarthyism, including loyalty oath requirements, powers of legislative investigating committees, and censorship of free speech and expression. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, the office focused on civil rights issues and the defense of alternative means of self expression. The Washington Office was also deeply involved with defending the civil liberties of those associated with the federal government and its agencies.
collection icon
American Committee for Devastated France
The American Committee for Devastated France collection contains the annual reports, promotional pamphlets and minutes of this post-World War I relief organization. Newspaper clippings and routine correspondence between the group's treasurer and other staff members are also included in the collection.
collection icon
Americans United for Separation of Church and State
The organization that became Americans United for Separation of Church and State was founded in 1947 to protect church-state separation and religious freedom, as well as to educate lawmakers, religious leaders, and the general public regarding Constitutional religious liberties. The records document the administration and issues of the organization from its founding and include correspondence, meeting materials, and publications.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Anne Martindell was one of the first three women to serve in the New Jersey State Senate. After her four-year term ended in 1977, she served as director of the Office for Foreign Disaster Assistance, and was ambassador to New Zealand and Western Samoa for a two-year term. The papers document her career in politics and civil service, and also contain her unpublished memoirs and personal papers.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Ann Whitman (1908-1991) was personal secretary to President Dwight D. Eisenhower during both of his administrations and later served as chief of staff to Vice President Nelson A. Rockefeller. Whitman's Papers on John Foster Dulles consist of photocopies of a portion of Whitman's files concerning secretaries of state John Foster Dulles and Christian A. Herter. The majority of the files consist of correspondence of John Foster Dulles, often with President Eisenhower or United States government officials, and also include a small amount of similar material of Christian A. Herter.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Professor Ansley J. Coale (1917-2002) was a demographer whose work focused on nuptiality, fertility, and mortality in several countries. Coale joined the Princeton University faculty in 1947 and spent his entire career as a member of the university's Office of Population Research (OPR). The papers contain correspondence, Coale's research papers and projects, and samples of data collected. The material spans the several decades (1950s to 1990s) Coale spent as a member of the Princeton faculty, as well as the work he did during his retirement.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Arnold A. Rogow (1924-2006) was a political scientist, author, and psychotherapist. His main area of research was psychological explanations for politics, especially the decision-making of leaders, notably James Forrestal and Alexander Hamilton. The Rogow Papers are composed of materials he collected for his book James Forrestal: A Study of Personality, Politics, and Policy (The Macmillan Press: New York, 1963) and include correspondence with individuals who knew Forrestal, Rogow's notes, and other research materials.
collection icon

Arthur Bullard Papers, 1905-1929
MC008
12 boxes 1 folder

Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Papers of Arthur Bullard (1879-1929), journalist and statesman, chronicle the major world political and economic events relating to World War I and its aftermath. Although the bulk of the material concerns Russia and Western Europe, there are writings on political events in North Africa, Central America, and East Asia as well. The collection includes copies and originals of newspaper and magazine articles, manuscripts of several novels, travel books, and political volumes, memorandum, and correspondence, most of which was written by Bullard. There is also a file of photographs and post cards.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Arthur Cyrus Warner (1918-2007) was a prominent figure in the gay liberation movement, focusing his efforts on legal reform to protect the civil liberties of the gay community. Warner's papers document his involvement in legal reform and other issues pertaining to gay rights. The papers largely consist of legislative and court documents about cases affecting gay civil liberties, and related memoranda, correspondence, and writings.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Arthur Krock (1886-1974) had a long and distinguished career as a journalist, working for much of his career as Washington correspondent and columnist for The New York Times. His column "In the Nation" was noted for its depth of information and analysis, especially on American politics. The Krock papers document his journalism career, especially with The New York Times, and include his correspondence, his writings, and biographical materials.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Arthur S. Link was an author, editor, scholar and publisher, but is best known as the leading historian on Woodrow Wilson and for his leadership over the publication of Wilson's papers. This collection consists of the personal papers of Link, which includes articles, correspondence, notes, office files, and presidency records of the American Historical Association.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The papers housed in the Arthur von Briesen Papers document the later years of Arthur von Briesen (1843-1920), a New York City lawyer and philanthropist. Von Briesen, a German-American patent lawyer, served as President of the Legal Aid Society of New York (1889-1916), and as president of the Alliance of Legal Aid Societies of America. Aside from emphasizing his work with the Legal Aid Society, the papers also highlight a variety of other areas--professional, political, and philanthropic--actively pursued by von Briesen. The papers illuminate the passionate side of von Briesen in the private correspondence with his family and others, as well as his cultural interests and engagement within the German-American community of New York City.
collection icon
online icon
Association on American Indian Affairs
The Records of the Association on American Indian Affairs document the corporate life of an influential and resilient player in the history of twentieth-century Native American advocacy. From its formation by non-Indians in New York in 1922 to its re-establishment in South Dakota in 1995 under a wholly Indian administration, the AAIA has defended the rights and promoted the welfare of Native Americans and, in this process, has shaped the views of their fellow citizens. The AAIA has waged innumerable battles over the years, touching on the material and spiritual well-being of Indians in every state of the Union: from the right of Native Americans to control their resources to their right to worship freely; from their right to federal trusteeship to their right to self-determination. The evolving nature of this struggle, in terms of conception and execution; the environment in which it was waged, both within and without the AAIA; the parade of men and women who figured in it; and the relationships among them can all be found in the abundant and insightful records which constitute these Records. The correspondence, minutes, reports, articles, clippings, and other documents in the collection, augmented by photographic and audiovisual material, represent a window not only on the AAIA but on the entities and personalities with which it interacted. While its vision has co-existed with others, and while it has been far from alone in its contribution to Indian life, no consideration of twentieth-century Native American affairs can disregard its arduous and, for the most part, fruitful work.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists of two groups of material collected by Ferree: 1) copies of government reports, resolutions, proclamations, statements, and clippings concerning foreign relations, the entry of the United States into World War I, and other varied issues during the administration of Woodrow Wilson.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Benjamin Strong was a prominent New York banker who was instrumental in the foundation and success of the Federal Reserve Bank. This collection contains records pertaining to the former Benjamin Strong Collection of Foreign Public Finance in Princeton University Library, which was funded by Strong with the objective of acquiring books and original source material chronicling the development of foreign public finance, central banking, and international trade.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Bernard Flexner, a lawyer, philanthropist and Zionist leader, was an early supporter of the juvenile court movement. Contains the personal papers of Flexner, including diaries and letters to his sister Mary while he served with the American Red Cross Commission to Romania (1917) and as counsel for the Zionist delegation to the Paris Peace Conference (1918-1919); material concerning Albert Einstein, Franklin D. Roosevelt, the Sacco-Vanzetti trial record, and the juvenile court system of the early 1900s; and miscellaneous correspondence.
collection icon

Bernard M. Baruch Papers, 1701-1965 (mostly 1917-1965)
MC006
441 boxes 1 folder 340 Volumes

online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Bernard M. Baruch was a financier and public adviser. This collection consists primarily of public papers relating to Baruch's various involvements in government affairs.
collection icon

Bill Bradley Papers, 1959-1999
MC200
1141 boxes 1 folder

online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Bill Bradley (1943- ) was a United States Senator from New Jersey from 1979 to 1995. His papers document his career in the United States Senate and include subject files, copies of his speeches and testimony, press releases, his schedules and appointments, and awards he received. The papers also include the files of members of his legislative, administrative, and state office staff.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Blair Clark was a journalist and political activist who held many positions in both spheres. His papers contain items related to his employment with CBS News, his role in the establishment of the Edward R. Murrow Chair at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, and personal correspondence.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists mainly of correspondence and manuscripts of Tobey (Princeton Class of 1940) from the period (1955-1976) when he was a member of the staff of the Turkish Ministry of Education in Samsun, Turkey, teaching English.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists of papers retained by Carol Evans while she was secretary (1948-1961) of Stevenson and, later, assistant editor of The Papers of Adlai E. Stevenson (1972-1979), which were edited by Walter Johnson.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Chalmers Benedict Wood joined the Foreign Service after serving in World War II and held positions in several embassies as well as working in the State Department. These papers include writings, correspondence, clippings, and State Department documents from his time as a Foreign Service Officer in Vietnam in 1967-1969.
collection icon
online icon
Chandler & Company.
Chandler Company was a New York investment banking house with offices in New York and Philadelphia. The Company issued bonds for many companies and countries, including Bolivia, China, Costa Rica, and Germany. Chandler Company's records document the company's investment decisions in Germany, as well as Bolivia and Costa Rica, during the early 1920s and include correspondence and meeting minutes.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
The Papers of Charles A. Eaton (1868-1953), congressman from New Jersey, focus on Eaton's role as a delegate to the United Nations Conference in San Francisco, in 1945.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
General Charles T. Lanham (1902-1978), a decorated WWII General and friend of author Ernest Hemingway, was an accomplished author, trainer, and after retiring from the military had a successful second career as a public relations executive. The Charles T. Lanham Papers document the general's WWII and post war military service and his private sector employment with several corporations. The papers contain correspondence, scrapbooks, photographs, journals, speeches, and legal documents.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists of selected papers of Thompson, including 27 scrapbooks of clippings (1884-1941) of his columns and articles written while he was a Washington correspondent, book reviewer, and editor of the New York Times (1899-1921) and, later, a writer in Philadelphia for the Public Ledger (1921-1922) and Commonweal (1930-1931).
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Charles W. Yost (1907-1981) led a varied career as a diplomat, United Nations representative, writer, and scholar. He was a member of the foreign service intermittently between 1930 and 1971, after which time he devoted himself full-time to writing and teaching. Yost's papers document his professional life in the Foreign Service, as well as his time in academia, and include his correspondence, writings, and photographs.
collection icon
Civil Service Reform Association (New York, N.Y.)
Consists of some files of the Civil Service Reform Association and its affiliates, containing correspondence and reports urging that appointments to the Civil Service be based upon a competitive examination.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists primarily of correspondence relating to the work of Carver (Princeton Class of 1913) as secretary (1914-1915) to Walter H. Page, the American ambassador in London, as secretary (1915) to Edward Mandell House in Europe, and as assistant to Bernard M. Baruch working for the War Industries Board, and to his commission in the U.S. Navy attached to the Office of Naval Intelligence (1917-1918).
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Clinton A. Decker traveled to Russia as part of the American Advisory Commission to Russia of Railway Experts (1917) and later became a member of the Inter-Allied Technical Board (1919-1922). The collection contains personal and business correspondence and photographs documenting Decker's travels in Russia, China, and Japan.
collection icon
Hardy Family
The Collection on William F. McCombs contains materials on and by William F. McCombs, a lawyer who was actively involved in Woodrow Wilson's gubernatorial and presidential campaigns. McCombs' secretary, Maurice F. Lyons, provided transcripts of correspondence and notes authored by McCombs to Arthur S. Link, as part of Link's work on The Papers of Woodrow Wilson. Correspondence between Lyons and Link concerning the typescripts is also located in this collection, as well as a set of bound newspaper clippings on Wilson's campaigns and administrations created by McComb's sister.
collection icon
online icon
Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies
The Records of the Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies (CDAAA) document the Committee to Defend America from its inception in May 1940 to its official dissolution in October 1942. In January, 1942 CDAAA merged with the Council for Democracy to form Citizens for Victory: To Win the War, To Win the Peace. The Committee to Defend America was a propaganda organization that worked to persuade the American public that the United States should supply the Allies with as much material and financial aid as possible in order to keep the United States out of the war. During its year and a half tenure the Committee successfully garnered support from across the country and from other parts of the world.
collection icon

Common Cause Records, 1968-1991
MC054
328 boxes 4 items

online icon
Common Cause (U.S.)
Common Cause is a non-profit advocacy organization committed to honest, open and accountable government and participation in the democratic process. The Common Cause Records consists of files of various staff members, general correspondence, reports of projects and studies, recordings of meetings and testimonies of staff, state files, and other corporate papers.
collection icon
online icon
Council on Books in Wartime
The Council on Books in Wartime Records (1942-1947), an organization of publishers and other literary professionals focusing on the promotion of books and reading to further the war effort, consists of records from the preliminary foundation meetings at Times Hall, New York, through the cessation of formal operations in 1946. The major activities of the organization were focused on its two subsidiary publishing ventures, the Armed Services Editions (1943-1947) and the Overseas Editions, Inc. (1944-1945). The Records consist primarily of correspondence of council members, publishers, printers, booksellers, librarians, and the general public. Also present are meeting minutes, press releases, bulletins, radio scripts, contracts, financial records, letters from servicemen, a few photographs of authors and council members, newspaper clippings, and posters. At its last annual meeting in January 1946 the Council's Board of Directors determined that at the end of operations "such records of the Council as merit preservation shall be deposited in an appropriate public institution such as Princeton University Library." The Records were subsequently acquired by Princeton University Library and then librarian Julian P. Boyd.
collection icon
online icon
Council on foreign relations
The Council on Foreign Relations is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research and national membership organization dedicated to promoting improved understanding of international affairs and to contributing ideas to United States foreign policy. The Meetings Series documents the work of the Council's Meetings Department, including administrative issues, such as correspondence with speakers, attendance records, and the non-attribution rule, as well as the records of the actual meetings themselves.
collection icon

Council on Foreign Relations Records, 1918-2018
MC104
702 boxes 22 items 311 Reels

online icon
Council on foreign relations
The Council on Foreign Relations is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research and national membership organization dedicated to improving understanding of international affairs by promoting a range of ideas and opinions on United States foreign policy. The Council has had a significant impact in the development of twentieth century United States foreign policy. The Records of the Council on Foreign Relations document the history of the organization from its founding in 1921 through the present. The collection includes valuable source documents and records of the meetings, group discussions and studies, and conferences of the Council, as well as portions of its administrative records.
collection icon
online icon
Council on foreign relations
The Council on Foreign Relations is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research and national membership organization dedicated to promoting improved understanding of international affairs and to contributing ideas to United States foreign policy. The Studies Department Series documents the planning and execution of the various study groups (including discussion groups, current issue review groups, seminars, workshops and conferences) and projects.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Dana Gardner Munro (1892-1990) was an American diplomat to Latin America and a professor of history and director of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. His papers document segments of his scholarly and diplomatic work, and include Department of State press releases, subject files, lectures, correspondence, and articles relating to United States-Latin American relations and Latin American history.
collection icon

David A. Morse Papers, 1895-2003 (mostly 1942-1990)
MC097
124 boxes 1 folder 1 item

online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The David A. Morse Papers document the life and times of David Abner Morse (1907-1990), American lawyer, soldier, and public official. While he distinguished himself in legal, military, and governmental circles, the most fruitful years of his life were spent at the helm of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the oldest member of the United Nations' family of specialized agencies. As Director-General of the International Labour Office in Geneva from 1948 to 1970, Morse guided the increasingly complex activities of this tripartite organization, which unites in one body the representatives of workers, governments, and employers. No one has had a longer tenure as its head, and no one has presided over such far-reaching changes in its composition and orientation. Drawing on a variety of experiences in the field of domestic and international labor, including appointments as Assistant, Under, and Acting Secretary of Labor in the Truman administration, Morse gave practical meaning in a postwar context to the ILO's underlying philosophy, namely, that "universal and lasting peace can be established only if it is based upon social justice." The pursuit of this object won for the ILO the Nobel Peace Prize in 1969. The David Morse Papers contain correspondence, reports, memoranda, photographs, and newspaper clippings that document this long, productive career.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
David Lilienthal served on the Wisconsin Public Service Commission (1923-1932), as a member of the board of directors (1933-1941) and then chairman (1941-1946) of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), as first chairman (1946-1950) of the Atomic Energy Commission, and, later, in private business as an industrial consultant and chairman (1955) of the Development and Resources Corporation, which was involved with the Khuzestan Program in Iran. This collection consists of the papers of Lilienthal spanning his entire career, including correspondence, reports, articles, speeches, and printed matter.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
David F. Bradford (1939-2005) was a professor of economics and public affairs at Princeton University and served on the faculty from 1966 to 2005. His main areas of study were public finance and urban problems, and he was internationally known as an expert on taxation. Bradford's papers document his academic career and include correspondence files and conference files, as well as papers related to his research with Harry H. Kelejian, his appointment books, and biographical materials from his years as a student.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
David Lawrence, Princeton Class of 1910, was an American magazine and news service founder, editor, columnist, and author. This collection contains papers of Lawrence, including correspondence with notable twentieth century figures, articles, speeches, correspondent dispatches, radio broadcast transcripts, and manuscripts for several books.
collection icon
online icon
Development and Resources Corporation
The Development and Resources Corporation (D), founded and directed by David E. Lilienthal, operated from 1955 to 1979 and was based in New York City. D provided regional economic development services to governments throughout the world, often with a focus on the development of water resources and the construction of dams. Its main project was the development of the Khuzestan region of Iran. D's records document its development projects and business operations and include correspondence, contracts, data and maps, proposals and reports, and collected materials about each country.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists of copies of correspondence, telephone conversations, memoranda, messages, statements, speeches, treaty drafts, and other material in the Dwight D. Eisenhower Library in Abilene, Kansas, relating to John Foster Dulles (Princeton Class of 1908) during his term as secretary of state (1951-1959), which have been declassified by the General Services Administration from 1979 to the present
collection icon
Economists' National Committee on Monetary Policy (U.S.)
The Economists' National Committee on Monetary Policy, active from November 1933 to 1970, was composed of economists and other financial experts who sought to educate the public and United States government on sound monetary policy. The Committee advocated for a return to the gold standard and sought to combat what they saw as dangerous inflationist sentiment and aggressive monetary policies of the time through public addresses, publishing articles and pamphlets, and testifying before Congress. The records document the Committee's work, as well as its organization and administration, and include correspondence, meeting minutes, and publications.
collection icon

Edward Mead Earle Papers, 1894-1954
MC020
39 boxes 2 items

online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Papers of Edward Mead Earle (1894-1954) document the career of Earle, a specialist in the role of the military in foreign relations. He was a university lecturer, author, and consultant to various departments of the U.S. government. The papers reflect Earle's work as a professor at the School of Economics and Politics at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey. The collection emphasizes Earle's major work of establishing a seminar designed to research issues associated with military and foreign policies of the United States during World War II. It also highlights a number of other professional activities during his time at the Institute.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
This collection contains correspondence, speeches, lecture notes, writings, and photographs of Edward S. Corwin, a noted constitutional scholar who taught at Princeton University for much of his academic career. Nationally-known and widely published, Corwin consulted with many other academics as well as politicians involved with constitutional issues, most notably when he publicly supported Franklin D. Roosevelt's Supreme Court reorganization ("court packing") plan.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Edward S. Greenbaum (1890-1970) was a lawyer in New York City in the legal firm of Greenbaum, Wolff Ernst who was involved in court reform efforts throughout his career. He also served in the War Department during World War II as executive officer to Under Secretary of War Robert P. Patterson, negotiating contracts with the private sector for munitions and supplies. Greenbaum's papers document his career as a lawyer, as well as his government service, and include correspondence, legal documents, reports, and publications.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
Edwin W. Kemmerer (1875-1945), internationally known as "The Money Doctor," was an economist and government advisor with expertise in finance and currency. Kemmerer served as a financial advisor to many governments, mostly in Latin America, and spent the majority of his academic career at Princeton University. Kemmerer's papers document his advisory and scholarly career and include his professional correspondence, writings, and files from his financial advisory work.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
E. Kimbark MacColl has written extensively on the history and politics of Portland, Oregon. Consists of notes, outlines, correspondence, and chapter drafts for MacColl's Ph.D. thesis, "The Supreme Court and Public Opinion: A Study of the Court Fight of 1937" (1953).
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Eleanor L. Dulles (1895-1996) was an economic specialist for the U.S. State Department from 1942 to 1962. She was most prominently known for her work in rebuilding West Berlin from 1952 to 1960. Dulles's papers document her political writings after her retirement from the State Department in 1962, as well as her fundraising work with the John Foster Dulles Memorial Fund, and include drafts of her articles and books, topical files, and some correspondence.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Emmet John Hughes (1920-1982) was a journalist and speechwriter. The collection is primarily composed of drafts, research files, reviews, and other materials pertaining to various books and articles written by Hughes. The collection also documents Hughes's work as a speechwriter for Dwight D. Eisenhower in the presidential campaigns of 1952 and 1956 and the first year of Eisenhower's presidency, as well as his role as a political advisor and speechwriter for Governor Nelson Rockefeller's 1968 presidential bid.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Eugene M. Becker Papers consist primarily of planning documents, position papers, articles, addresses, correspondence, and scrapbooks which document Becker's career in public service as Budget Director of New York City under Mayor John Lindsay; Assistant Secretary of the United States Army during the Johnson and Nixon administrations; and Chairman of the Advisory Board of the Mentor Group, a research institute focusing on constitutional, legal-economic comparative studies and sponsor of the Forum for US-EU Legal-Economic Affairs, the Forum for Russian Legal-Economic Affairs, and the Central European Forum for Legal-Economic Affairs.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Ferdinand Eberstadt (1890-1969) was a prominent Wall Street investment banker who also served in several government posts throughout his career. During World War II, he organized the production and distribution of supplies to the United States military through his work with the Army-Navy Munitions Board and the War Production Board, and he was subsequently involved in plans for the reorganization of the armed services and in the development of post-war economic policies. The Eberstadt papers primarily document his extensive career in public service to the United States related to defense and the economy, as well as his career as an investment banker and his personal life, and include correspondence, reports, his writings, and his personal papers.
collection icon
online icon
Fight for Freedom (Organization)
Fight for Freedom, Inc. (FFF), a national citizen's organization established in April 1941, was a leading proponent of full American participation in World War II. Believing that the war was a threat to American freedom and security, FFF boldly and vehemently championed the interventionist cause, advocating that all necessary measures must be taken to insure the defeat of Adolf Hitler and the German Army. In addition, FFF worked to preserve fundamental American freedoms at home. An offshoot of the Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies, FFF was supported by average citizens, as well as prominent educators, labor leaders, authors and playwrights, clergy, stage and screen actors, newspaper men, and politicians. Acting as a clearinghouse for information related to American intervention in World War II, FFF monitored the activities of the leading isolationist organization, the America First Committee, and many of its key individuals such as Charles A. Lindbergh, Burton Wheeler, and Gerald Nye. From its headquarters in New York City, FFF spread its message through an extensive network of state and local branches, as well as through heavy reliance on local newspaper editors supportive of the interventionist cause. Pearl Harbor effectively ended the isolationist-interventionist debate, and by early 1942 FFF had disbanded.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists of papers of Scott relating, for the most part, to his positions as chairman of the General Munitions Board during World War I, co-founder and chairman of the War Industries Board (1917), chief of the Cleveland Ordnance District (1924-1928), and adviser to the Army Industrial College (1925).
collection icon
online icon
Franklin book programs
The Records of the Franklin Book Programs document the activities of the organization from its inception in 1952 to its dissolution in 1978. For 26 years, Franklin assisted developing countries in the creation, production, distribution, and use of books and other educational materials. Its efforts were based on the premise that through wider and improved education, underdeveloped nations could better utilize their human resources to help eliminate hunger, poverty, overpopulation, and economic paralysis.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Frank Thompson was a New Jersey politician. He was elected congressman from the Fourth Congressional District of New Jersey in 1955 and was assigned to the Education, Labor, and Administration committees. The papers in this collection reflect his special interests in federal aid to education and the arts.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Frank W. Notestein contributed significantly to the science of demography and to a better understanding of population problems in world affairs. The Frank W. Notestein Papers contain correspondence, speeches, and writings documenting the research, ideas, career and leadership roles of this former Princeton professor, director of the Office of Population Research, and president of the Population Council.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Fred I. Kent (1869-1954) was a banker who spent the majority of his career at Bankers Trust Company in New York. He was an expert on foreign exchange, and during World War I and its aftermath was involved with establishing foreign exchange policies, reparations, and war debt. Kent was also active in numerous organizations, including the American Bankers Association and the International Chamber of Commerce. Kent's papers include his correspondence with businessmen and politicians about financial and economic issues, articles and speeches written by Kent, and papers documenting his involvement with several banking and economic organizations.
collection icon

Freedom House Records, 1933-2017
MC187
196 boxes 1 folder 6 items

online icon
Freedom House U.S.
The Freedom House Records document the organization's activities in advocating freedom and democracy throughout the world. The records provide an invaluable insight into an organization that evolved from an answer to Hitler's Braunhaus to a diligent monitor of freedom worldwide.
collection icon
online icon
Fund for the Republic
The Records of the Fund for the Republic document the activities of the Fund for the Republic, Inc. and its defense of civil rights and civil liberties from 1952 through 1961. The records provide an invaluable look at the Fund's struggle to uphold the basic principles of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights during the years of McCarthyism and its aftermath.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
G. Edward Pendray was an early proponent of rocket power and space flight and co-founder Pendray and Company, a prominent public relations firm. The G. Edward Pendray Papers consist of correspondence, notes, memoranda, drafts, reports, photographs, and printed material related to Pendray's career in public relations and his life-long interest and involvement in aeronautics and astronautics.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
The General Manuscripts Collection is largely composed of materials related to United States politics and government, including personal and business correspondence, manuscripts, memorabilia, pamphlets, and reports. The collection includes the papers of many individuals, including Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt and other United States presidents, government officials, authors and journalists, bankers and businessmen, and Princeton University alumni.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
George Adams Graham, faculty member in the Department of Politics at Princeton University from 1935 to 1958, specialized in the field of public administration. He was also active in public life, serving on the Citizens Federal Committee on Education; the Committee on Indian Affairs (a subcommittee of the Hoover Commission on Organization of the Executive Branch of Government); the Committee on Public Administration of the Social Science Research Council; and the second Hoover Commission's Task Force on Personnel and Civil Service. His papers consist of reports, notes, correspondence, and subject files from his service in these capacities.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
This collection contains George Field's files of the organization Freedom House (1933-1990; Bulk Dates 1941-1969). Freedom House was formed in October 1941 as an organization dedicated to the defense of freedom throughout the world--a cause perceived to be in great danger. Founding members included George Field, Dorothy Thompson, Wendell L. Willkie, Herbert Agar, Herbert Bayard Swope, and Rex Stout. These and other members had been involved in both Fight For Freedom and in the New York Chapter of the Committee to Defend America By Aiding the Allies. Freedom House carried on the spirit of these two organizations by acting as a clearing house of information. Its first agenda was to work, during World War II, to prepare the country for peace, and then after the war to continue to defend peace and freedom throughout the world. Throughout the period from 1941 to 1967 George Field was the Executive Director of Freedom House and was in charge of the day-to-day activities as well as the long-range planning for the organization. These records reflect Field's position in Freedom House during this time. The collection contains only the records that George Field retained from Freedom House, not the official records of the organization. Included in these records are Field's copies of Freedom House meeting minutes, correspondence, newspaper clippings, publications and writings, financial files, legal files, and photographs.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
George F. Kennan (1904-2005) was a diplomat and a historian, noted especially for his influence on United States policy towards the Soviet Union during the Cold War and for his scholarly expertise in the areas of Russian history and foreign policy. Kennan's papers document his career as a scholar at the Institute for Advanced Study and his time in the Foreign Service, and include his correspondence files, published and unpublished writings, and personal files.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
George McAneny served in numerous positions in the government of New York City, including president of the Borough of Manhattan (1910-1913), president of the Board of Aldermen (1914-1916), and chairman of the State Transit Commission (1921). This collection consists of lectures, reports, correspondence, committee and association files, clippings, scrapbooks, and photographs, all of which reflect his special interests in regional and city planning, zoning, city and state transit, and city financing.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
George Stanley McGovern was a Congressman (1957-1961), a U.S. Senator (1963-1981), and a Democratic presidential nominee known for his strong liberal stance, particularly during the Vietnam War. This collection contains legislation files, campaign materials, correspondence, speech texts, schedules and invitations, travel files, patronage files, subject files, photographs, and audiovisual materials documenting McGovern's activities in the House of Representatives and in the U.S. Senate, as well as his time as Director of Food for Peace.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
The Audiovisual Materials series documents McGovern's political activities from 1957-1984. It contains film footage, video recordings, audiotapes and audiocassettes, computer tapes and diskettes, and other formats. It is the only series in this collection that includes material for the years 1981-1984.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The George W. Ball papers document Ball's career as a lawyer, diplomat, investment banker and author. His involvement in Democratic politics, including his time spent on the presidential campaigns of Adlai Stevenson and his service as undersecretary of state for John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson is well documented, as is his often overlooked role with Jean Monnet in European integration.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
During World War I, Gilbert Fairchild Close held several positions in the government of President Woodrow Wilson, culminating with that of Stenographer and Private Secretary to the President. The papers document Close's work with Wilson, including the trip Close took to Europe with Wilson for the Paris Peace Conference at the conclusion of World War I.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
H. Alexander Smith served as the executive secretary of Princeton University and was later elected to the United States Senate representing New Jersey. Smith made contributions to United States foreign policy while serving on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. The bulk of documentation focuses on his tenure in the Senate and the period immediately after his retirement; reports, correspondence, and printed material from his work at Princeton are also included. The papers contain diaries, correspondence, speeches, notes, photographs, and memorabilia.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Hamilton Fish Armstrong Papers consist of correspondence, notebooks, memoranda, material from 1945 United Nations Conference on International Organization, writings especially in relation to Peace and Counterpeace and Tito and Goliath, diaries, scrapbooks, and photographs. The papers document Armstrong's career as editor of Foreign Affairs, his participation in the activities of the Council on Foreign Relations, and his professional involvement and interest in foreign policy from World War I through the 1970s. Included is correspondence with many well known political and literary figures of the time period. Some materials of a personal nature are included but the bulk of the papers relates to Armstrong's professional life. The papers also document Armstrong's participation in many philanthropic activities associated with Yugoslavia.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists of copies of court documents, correspondence, and clippings of Hank Adams, an Assinboine-Sioux Indian, who worked for the National Indian Youth Council and the National Congress of American Indians, and as national director (1968- ) of the Survival of American Indians Association (SAIA).
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Hans A. Widenmann (1897-1976) was a stockbroker and economist with expertise in national and international monetary affairs. His successful business career was largely spent at Loeb, Rhoades Company, and he was also frequently called upon to speak about international finance subjects. Widenmann's papers document his career at Loeb, Rhoades Company and include his correspondence and writings, topical files, and biographical files.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Harley L. Lutz (1882-1975) was an economist with expertise in taxation and public finance who spent his academic career at Oberlin College, Stanford University, and Princeton University. Lutz also served as an advisor on public finance, especially taxation, to the federal and state governments and was an outspoken opponent of increases in government spending. Lutz's papers document his career as an economist, as well as his work as a consultant on taxation and public finance, and include writings, reports, and correspondence.
collection icon
online icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Harold Boies Hoskins was a businessman, diplomat, and educator working in Middle Eastern affairs. This collection consists of correspondence, diaries, notes, photographs, publications, maps, and professional files that document Hoskins' personal and professional activities, as well as the Hoskins family.
collection icon
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Harold Gardiner Bowen was director of the Naval Research Laboratory (1939-1942), special assistant to the Secretary of the Navy (1939-1947), chief of the Office of Naval Research (1946-1947), and executive secretary of the Thomas Alva Edison Foundation. This collection consists of selected papers of Vice-Admiral Bowen, including speeches, articles, documents, printed matter, and manuscripts for his book Ships, Machinery, and Mossbacks, The Autobiography of a Naval Engineer (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1954).