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Start Over You searched for: Genre Terms Correspondence. Remove constraint Genre Terms: Correspondence. Names Public Policy Papers Remove constraint Names: Public Policy Papers Date range 1850 to 1899 Remove constraint Date range: <span class='from'>1850</span> to <span class='to'>1899</span>

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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Adlai E. Stevenson Papers document the public life of Adlai Stevenson (1900-1965), governor of Illinois, Democratic presidential candidate, and United Nations ambassador. The collection contains correspondence, speeches, writings, campaign materials, subject files, United Nations materials, personal files, photographs, and audiovisual materials, illuminating Stevenson's career in law, politics, and diplomacy, primarily from his first presidential campaign until his death in 1965.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Alfred J. Lotka (1880-1949), a statistician for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, was a significant contributor to the field of demography. He was a pioneer in the study of population dynamics and conducted research on the mathematical theory of evolution and the mathematical analysis of populations. Lotka's papers document his scholarship and his involvement in professional organizations and include drafts of his works, his notes and research materials, and correspondence.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Allen W. Dulles Papers contains correspondence, speeches, writings, and photographs documenting the life of this lawyer, diplomat, businessman, and spy. One of the longest-serving directors of the Central Intelligence Agency (1953-1961), he also served in a key intelligence post in Bern, Switzerland during World War II, as well as on the Warren Commission.
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American Civil Liberties Union Records, 1864-2011 (mostly 1917-1995)
MC001
4207.37 linear feet 5727 boxes 1886 Volumes 288 Reels

American civil liberties union
The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is the pre-eminent civil liberties organization in the United States, utilizing litigation, lobbying, and public education to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution. These records document the administration and work of the ACLU's national office, regional offices, and legal projects, with particular emphasis on the areas of civil rights, children and women's rights, freedom of speech (and all First Amendment questions), and due process, among many others. The records include case files, correspondence, meeting minutes, research files, and files of staff members. Portions of the records (Subgroup 1; Subgroup 2, Series 2, 3, and 4; Subgroup 3, Subseries 5B) have been digitized and are available for members of the Princeton community to view here . To view the database from outside Princeton University, please see the Guide to the American Civil Liberties Union Records .
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American civil liberties union
The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is the pre-eminent civil liberties organization in the United States, utilizing litigation, lobbying, and public education to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution. These records document the administration and work of the ACLU's national office, regional offices, and legal projects, with particular emphasis on the areas of civil rights, children and women's rights, freedom of speech (and all First Amendment questions), and due process, among many others. The records include case files, correspondence, meeting minutes, research files, and files of staff members. Subgroup 3, Subseries 5B (Southern Regional Office) has been digitized and is available for members of the Princeton community to view here . To view the database from outside Princeton University, please see the Guide to the American Civil Liberties Union Records .
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American civil liberties union
The Project Files series contains the records of twelve of the ACLU's projects, which each addressed an area of civil liberties violations. Project records typically consist of case files, research files, and project publicity and correspondence. The best documented projects are the Children's Rights Project and Women's Rights Project, and to a lesser extent the Arts Censorship Project, Capital Punishment Project, and Reproductive Freedom Project.
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American civil liberties union
The Regional Offices series documents the work and administration of the ACLU's three regional offices: Mountain States Regional Office, concerned with civil rights in the west and Native American rights, the Southern Regional Office, focusing on civil rights in the south, and the Washington, D.C. office, which concentrates on national legislation and the actions of the federal government. The files include correspondence, case files, office publications, research files, and the papers of individual staff members. Subgroup 3, Subseries 5B (Southern Regional Office) has been digitized and is available for members of the Princeton community to view here . To view the database from outside Princeton University, please see the Guide to the American Civil Liberties Union Records .
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Anne Martindell was one of the first three women to serve in the New Jersey State Senate. After her four-year term ended in 1977, she served as director of the Office for Foreign Disaster Assistance, and was ambassador to New Zealand and Western Samoa for a two-year term. The papers document her career in politics and civil service, and also contain her unpublished memoirs and personal papers.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The papers housed in the Arthur von Briesen Papers document the later years of Arthur von Briesen (1843-1920), a New York City lawyer and philanthropist. Von Briesen, a German-American patent lawyer, served as President of the Legal Aid Society of New York (1889-1916), and as president of the Alliance of Legal Aid Societies of America. Aside from emphasizing his work with the Legal Aid Society, the papers also highlight a variety of other areas--professional, political, and philanthropic--actively pursued by von Briesen. The papers illuminate the passionate side of von Briesen in the private correspondence with his family and others, as well as his cultural interests and engagement within the German-American community of New York City.
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Association on American Indian Affairs
The Records of the Association on American Indian Affairs document the corporate life of an influential and resilient player in the history of twentieth-century Native American advocacy. From its formation by non-Indians in New York in 1922 to its re-establishment in South Dakota in 1995 under a wholly Indian administration, the AAIA has defended the rights and promoted the welfare of Native Americans and, in this process, has shaped the views of their fellow citizens. The AAIA has waged innumerable battles over the years, touching on the material and spiritual well-being of Indians in every state of the Union: from the right of Native Americans to control their resources to their right to worship freely; from their right to federal trusteeship to their right to self-determination. The evolving nature of this struggle, in terms of conception and execution; the environment in which it was waged, both within and without the AAIA; the parade of men and women who figured in it; and the relationships among them can all be found in the abundant and insightful records which constitute these Records. The correspondence, minutes, reports, articles, clippings, and other documents in the collection, augmented by photographic and audiovisual material, represent a window not only on the AAIA but on the entities and personalities with which it interacted. While its vision has co-existed with others, and while it has been far from alone in its contribution to Indian life, no consideration of twentieth-century Native American affairs can disregard its arduous and, for the most part, fruitful work.