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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
William E. Colby, Princeton University Class of 1940, was a career agent in the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and Director of Central Intelligence from 1973-1976. However, the bulk of the collection documents his post-CIA career and contains correspondence, speeches, writings, newspaper clippings, and subject files that reflect Colby's professional and private interests.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists of correspondence and miscellaneous material relating to the Welsh translator, novelist, and storywriter Arthur Machen (1863-1947) that was collected by the American businessman and author William Francis Gekle.
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Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
The papers consist primarily of records maintained in William Fitts Ryan's congressional office in Washington, D.C. his district office in New York City, and campaign materials.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The William Hard Papers consist of correspondence files, notes, typescripts, speeches, papers and articles relating to the career of William Hard. The papers also contain a significant amount of supplementary printed materials Hard used for research on his unpublished publication on the League of Nations fight during the Wilson presidency.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
William Harlowe Briggs was a playwright and editor at Harper Brothers during the early part of the twentieth century. His papers include 24 scripts from Briggs's plays, family correspondence, playbills, lectures, and diaries from Briggs's mother and father.
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William Libbey Correspondence, 1876-1925
C0872
1 box 0.4 linear feet

Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists of correspondence of William Libby, a Princeton graduate (Class of 1877) and professor in geology. Correspondents include people associated with Princeton, Libby's work in the field of geology, and personal friends.