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Alonzo Church Papers, 1924-1995
C0948
85 boxes 35.1 linear feet

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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Alonzo Church Papers consists of the writings, correspondence, notebooks, notes, and subject files of Alonzo Church (1903-1995, Princeton Class of 1924), the renowned mathematical logician who taught at Princeton University from 1929-1967 and the University of California at Los Angeles from 1967 to 1990, and who was editor of the Journal of Symbolic Logic from 1936 to 1979.
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Association on American Indian Affairs
The Records of the Association on American Indian Affairs document the corporate life of an influential and resilient player in the history of twentieth-century Native American advocacy. From its formation by non-Indians in New York in 1922 to its re-establishment in South Dakota in 1995 under a wholly Indian administration, the AAIA has defended the rights and promoted the welfare of Native Americans and, in this process, has shaped the views of their fellow citizens. The AAIA has waged innumerable battles over the years, touching on the material and spiritual well-being of Indians in every state of the Union: from the right of Native Americans to control their resources to their right to worship freely; from their right to federal trusteeship to their right to self-determination. The evolving nature of this struggle, in terms of conception and execution; the environment in which it was waged, both within and without the AAIA; the parade of men and women who figured in it; and the relationships among them can all be found in the abundant and insightful records which constitute these Records. The correspondence, minutes, reports, articles, clippings, and other documents in the collection, augmented by photographic and audiovisual material, represent a window not only on the AAIA but on the entities and personalities with which it interacted. While its vision has co-existed with others, and while it has been far from alone in its contribution to Indian life, no consideration of twentieth-century Native American affairs can disregard its arduous and, for the most part, fruitful work.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Benjamin Strong was a prominent New York banker who was instrumental in the foundation and success of the Federal Reserve Bank. This collection contains records pertaining to the former Benjamin Strong Collection of Foreign Public Finance in Princeton University Library, which was funded by Strong with the objective of acquiring books and original source material chronicling the development of foreign public finance, central banking, and international trade.
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Common Cause Records, 1968-1991
MC054
328 boxes 4 items

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Common Cause (U.S.)
Common Cause is a non-profit advocacy organization committed to honest, open and accountable government and participation in the democratic process. The Common Cause Records consists of files of various staff members, general correspondence, reports of projects and studies, recordings of meetings and testimonies of staff, state files, and other corporate papers.
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Dance Subject Files, 1900-1989
TC107
31 boxes 12.4 linear feet

Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The Dance Subject Files consist of dance-related subject files from early 20th century through 1980s. Among the material are clippings, photos, programs, promotional materials, and dance school brochures.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Frank Thompson was a New Jersey politician. He was elected congressman from the Fourth Congressional District of New Jersey in 1955 and was assigned to the Education, Labor, and Administration committees. The papers in this collection reflect his special interests in federal aid to education and the arts.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
This collection contains George Field's files of the organization Freedom House (1933-1990; Bulk Dates 1941-1969). Freedom House was formed in October 1941 as an organization dedicated to the defense of freedom throughout the world--a cause perceived to be in great danger. Founding members included George Field, Dorothy Thompson, Wendell L. Willkie, Herbert Agar, Herbert Bayard Swope, and Rex Stout. These and other members had been involved in both Fight For Freedom and in the New York Chapter of the Committee to Defend America By Aiding the Allies. Freedom House carried on the spirit of these two organizations by acting as a clearing house of information. Its first agenda was to work, during World War II, to prepare the country for peace, and then after the war to continue to defend peace and freedom throughout the world. Throughout the period from 1941 to 1967 George Field was the Executive Director of Freedom House and was in charge of the day-to-day activities as well as the long-range planning for the organization. These records reflect Field's position in Freedom House during this time. The collection contains only the records that George Field retained from Freedom House, not the official records of the organization. Included in these records are Field's copies of Freedom House meeting minutes, correspondence, newspaper clippings, publications and writings, financial files, legal files, and photographs.
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Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
George McAneny served in numerous positions in the government of New York City, including president of the Borough of Manhattan (1910-1913), president of the Board of Aldermen (1914-1916), and chairman of the State Transit Commission (1921). This collection consists of lectures, reports, correspondence, committee and association files, clippings, scrapbooks, and photographs, all of which reflect his special interests in regional and city planning, zoning, city and state transit, and city financing.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
The papers of Princeton University professor Harper Hubert Wilson document his interest and work in civil liberties. A self described "conservative, anarchist and socialist," Wilson provoked his students to think critically about the social problems confronting society, and to challenge the prevailing assumptions about American politics.
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Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
The Ivy L. Lee Papers consist of personal papers and material from the public relations firm of Ivy Lee and Associates, documenting Ivy Lee's public relations theories and practice. Included are correspondence, diaries, articles, writings, public relations material, newsreels, and photographs reflecting Lee's interest in public relations, transportation (especially railroads), financial markets, and foreign relations, among others. The Papers also contain documents relating to other Lee family members including Reverend James W. Lee (father), Emma Eufaula Lee (mother), Cornelia Bartlett Bigelow Lee (wife), Alice Lee Cudlipp (daughter), James W. Lee II (son), and Ivy L. Lee, Jr. (son).