Public Policy Papers

Public Policy Papers

Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library
65 Olden Street
Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
(609) 258-6345
Housed at the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, the Public Policy Papers include important collections representing individuals and organizations in the areas of 20th-century American foreign policy, jurisprudence, journalism, public policy formation, and economic development.

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Association on American Indian Affairs
The Records of the Association on American Indian Affairs document the corporate life of an influential and resilient player in the history of twentieth-century Native American advocacy. From its formation by non-Indians in New York in 1922 to its re-establishment in South Dakota in 1995 under a wholly Indian administration, the AAIA has defended the rights and promoted the welfare of Native Americans and, in this process, has shaped the views of their fellow citizens. The AAIA has waged innumerable battles over the years, touching on the material and spiritual well-being of Indians in every state of the Union: from the right of Native Americans to control their resources to their right to worship freely; from their right to federal trusteeship to their right to self-determination. The evolving nature of this struggle, in terms of conception and execution; the environment in which it was waged, both within and without the AAIA; the parade of men and women who figured in it; and the relationships among them can all be found in the abundant and insightful records which constitute these Records. The correspondence, minutes, reports, articles, clippings, and other documents in the collection, augmented by photographic and audiovisual material, represent a window not only on the AAIA but on the entities and personalities with which it interacted. While its vision has co-existed with others, and while it has been far from alone in its contribution to Indian life, no consideration of twentieth-century Native American affairs can disregard its arduous and, for the most part, fruitful work.
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Fight for Freedom (Organization)
Fight for Freedom, Inc. (FFF), a national citizen's organization established in April 1941, was a leading proponent of full American participation in World War II. Believing that the war was a threat to American freedom and security, FFF boldly and vehemently championed the interventionist cause, advocating that all necessary measures must be taken to insure the defeat of Adolf Hitler and the German Army. In addition, FFF worked to preserve fundamental American freedoms at home. An offshoot of the Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies, FFF was supported by average citizens, as well as prominent educators, labor leaders, authors and playwrights, clergy, stage and screen actors, newspaper men, and politicians. Acting as a clearinghouse for information related to American intervention in World War II, FFF monitored the activities of the leading isolationist organization, the America First Committee, and many of its key individuals such as Charles A. Lindbergh, Burton Wheeler, and Gerald Nye. From its headquarters in New York City, FFF spread its message through an extensive network of state and local branches, as well as through heavy reliance on local newspaper editors supportive of the interventionist cause. Pearl Harbor effectively ended the isolationist-interventionist debate, and by early 1942 FFF had disbanded.
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Franklin book programs
The Records of the Franklin Book Programs document the activities of the organization from its inception in 1952 to its dissolution in 1978. For 26 years, Franklin assisted developing countries in the creation, production, distribution, and use of books and other educational materials. Its efforts were based on the premise that through wider and improved education, underdeveloped nations could better utilize their human resources to help eliminate hunger, poverty, overpopulation, and economic paralysis.
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Paris Peace Conference 1919-1920
Ray Stannard Baker (1870-1946) was a journalist, editor, and author. He earned recognition for his articles on liberal reform, for his philosophical essays written under the pseudonym David Grayson, and for his authorized biography and other works on President Woodrow Wilson. Baker's papers contain materials collected for his biography of President Woodrow Wilson and related to the Paris Peace Conference (1919-1920), which he attended as Director of the American Press Bureau, and include correspondence, publications, photographs, and newspaper clippings.
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Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
The Roger Nash Baldwin Papers document the life and career of Roger Baldwin (1884-1981), a prominent and active American civil libertarian for almost all of his prodigiously long life. Baldwin is remembered first and foremost as a founder of the American Civil Liberties Union. Many of the papers in this collection document his involvement with the conscientious objection movement that served as the forerunner to the ACLU and with the Union itself. He served as both its executive director from its foundation in 1920 to his retirement in 1950 and as an advisor from that date until his death in 1981. However, Baldwin cast his net much wider than just the ACLU. During the 1920s and 1930s, he was involved with various left-wing political organizations, including the Industrial Workers of the World. Following the end of World War II, he served as an advisor to the U.S. Army and the United Nations in Germany, Austria, Japan, and Korea, guiding the establishment of democracy in those countries, and he was for many years chair of the International League for the Rights of Man. He spoke and wrote widely, most often on issues of civil liberties and human rights, and also taught periodically throughout his life. The papers, which include correspondence, memos, writings, notes, and photographs, document all aspects of his public life, as well as some portion of his personal life.
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Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
The Papers of Charles A. Eaton (1868-1953), congressman from New Jersey, focus on Eaton's role as a delegate to the United Nations Conference in San Francisco, in 1945.
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William Alfred Eddy Papers, 1859-1978
MC041
24 boxes 1 folder

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Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
The papers of William A. Eddy (1896-1962), educator, diplomat, minister to Saudi Arabia, intelligence agent, and college president, focus on his presidency of Hobart College (1936-1941), his work in U.S. - Middle East policy, and his family life in the period from 1917-1962. The holdings of his personal and family correspondence is extensive. The collection contains all correspondence from his term as president of Hobart College, 1936-1941. Many military documents are included, especially in the years 1941-1946 (the planning of the North African landings, the FDR/Ibn Saud meeting, the Treaty of the Yemen). There are many geneological papers and letters from Eddy's relatives concerning American missionary work in the Middle East. There are numerous publications concerning 18th C. English literature, religious and civic duties, U.S. Foreign policy re Israel and the Arabs, and sociological accounts of the Middle East. The collection is composed of personal/professional correspondence, documents, diaries and notebooks, addresses, publications, manuscripts of Eddy's books and articles (including unpublished MSs), scrapbooks, photographs, negatives, and memorabilia.
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Arthur Garfield Hays Papers, 1915-1955
MC072
42 boxes 1 folder

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Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
The Arthur Garfield Hays Papers consist of correspondence, case files, speeches, articles, books, news clippings, and photos which document his career as a New York City lawyer and general counsel for the ACLU.
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Princeton University. Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections
The Robert Lansing Papers document the later years of Robert Lansing (1864-1928), lawyer, writer, and the longest serving of Woodrow Wilson's three Secretaries of State. During his tenure as Secretary of State (June 23, 1915 to February 13, 1920), the United States entered the First World War on the side of the Entente Powers. Deliberations and negotiations associated with the precarious neutrality which preceded this event and the troubled peace which followed it dominated Lansing's time in office and are reflected in his papers. Lansing's interests as a lawyer, which were international in scope and substance, and the diverse subjects which commanded his attention as a writer – subjects ranging from biblical history to English etymology – are also evident. The Lansing Papers consist of official papers, personal papers, writings and speeches, diaries, sketches, and photographs. Though by no means exhaustive, they shed light on many aspects of Lansing's life and times.