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Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies
The Records of the Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies (CDAAA) document the Committee to Defend America from its inception in May 1940 to its official dissolution in October 1942. In January, 1942 CDAAA merged with the Council for Democracy to form Citizens for Victory: To Win the War, To Win the Peace. The Committee to Defend America was a propaganda organization that worked to persuade the American public that the United States should supply the Allies with as much material and financial aid as possible in order to keep the United States out of the war. During its year and a half tenure the Committee successfully garnered support from across the country and from other parts of the world.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Eugene W. Sloan served as Assistant Secretary to the Treasury (beginning in 1935) and was the creator and first administrator of the United States Savings Bond program. Consists of fourteen scrapbooks compiled by Sloan. Two scrapbooks, which Sloan compiled while Executive Director of the War Savings Staff.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Ferdinand Eberstadt (1890-1969) was a prominent Wall Street investment banker who also served in several government posts throughout his career. During World War II, he organized the production and distribution of supplies to the United States military through his work with the Army-Navy Munitions Board and the War Production Board, and he was subsequently involved in plans for the reorganization of the armed services and in the development of post-war economic policies. The Eberstadt papers primarily document his extensive career in public service to the United States related to defense and the economy, as well as his career as an investment banker and his personal life, and include correspondence, reports, his writings, and his personal papers.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Harlan Cleveland (1918-2008) was a public administrator, ambassador to NATO, and a political scientist. He served in several positions related to the administration of economic aid programs during the 1940s, as an assistant secretary in the State Department and as U.S. ambassador to NATO during the 1960s, and also held positions at three universities and the Aspen Institute. Cleveland's papers document his government service and his work at the Aspen Institute, and include his speech and writings files, as well as correspondence and photographs.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Harry Dexter White (1892-1948) was an economist with expertise in international finance and monetary issues. White served in the United States Department of the Treasury from 1934 to 1946, rising to the position of Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, and was one of the principal architects of the Bretton Woods agreements in 1944 that established the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. White's papers document his service in the Department of the Treasury and include correspondence and memoranda, notes, and writings.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Howard C. Petersen (1910-1995) was an expert in international economics and foreign trade. He served in the War Department under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, as Assistant Secretary of War for President Harry S. Truman, as National Finance Chairman and fundraiser for the Dwight D. Eisenhower campaigns, and as Special Assistant on International Trade for President John F. Kennedy. Petersen was also a principal drafter of the Selective Service Act, a lawyer, and president of Fidelity-Philadelphia Trust Company. Petersen's papers document his entire career, especially his work with the new Security and Exchange Commission regulations as a lawyer in the 1930s and with the United States War Department during World War II, and include correspondence, articles, and publications.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Jacob Viner (1892-1970) is considered one of the greatest economists of the twentieth century. His career was spent at the University of Chicago and Princeton University, and he also frequently served as an advisor to the United States government. His primary academic interests included international economics, international economic relations, and the history of economic thought, but his investigations ranged across many disciplines. Viner's papers document his scholarship, as well as his government service, and include correspondence, manuscripts, reports, and research materials.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Consists of a typescript copy (carbon) of Migrant Pennsylvanian, an unpublished autobiography by lawyer Marcus S. Hottenstein, in which he reflects on the changes in transportation, economics, politics, and entertainment which took place during the decades from his birth in 1876 up to 1966.
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Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Tristan E. Beplat (1912-1997) was a New York banking executive with expertise in international banking. He had a significant role in the economic reconstruction of postwar Japan through his work in the Finance Division of the Economic and Scientific Section, General Headquarters, Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers. Beplat's papers document his service in Japan and include memoranda, papers, and reports on the banks and economy of Japan from 1945 to 1948.