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Collection

Booth Tarkington Papers, 1812-1956 (mostly 1899-1946)
C0062
281 boxes 131.9 linear feet

Online
Tarkington, Booth
Consists of extensive writings -- novels, plays, short stories, articles, film scenarios, radio scripts -- and correspondence of "The Gentleman from Indiana" Booth Tarkington, noted American author and winner of the Pulitzer Prize.
Collection
Online
Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies
The Records of the Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies (CDAAA) document the Committee to Defend America from its inception in May 1940 to its official dissolution in October 1942. In January, 1942 CDAAA merged with the Council for Democracy to form Citizens for Victory: To Win the War, To Win the Peace. The Committee to Defend America was a propaganda organization that worked to persuade the American public that the United States should supply the Allies with as much material and financial aid as possible in order to keep the United States out of the war. During its year and a half tenure the Committee successfully garnered support from across the country and from other parts of the world.
Collection
Online
Council on Books in Wartime
The Council on Books in Wartime Records (1942-1947), an organization of publishers and other literary professionals focusing on the promotion of books and reading to further the war effort, consists of records from the preliminary foundation meetings at Times Hall, New York, through the cessation of formal operations in 1946. The major activities of the organization were focused on its two subsidiary publishing ventures, the Armed Services Editions (1943-1947) and the Overseas Editions, Inc. (1944-1945). The Records consist primarily of correspondence of council members, publishers, printers, booksellers, librarians, and the general public. Also present are meeting minutes, press releases, bulletins, radio scripts, contracts, financial records, letters from servicemen, a few photographs of authors and council members, newspaper clippings, and posters. At its last annual meeting in January 1946 the Council's Board of Directors determined that at the end of operations "such records of the Council as merit preservation shall be deposited in an appropriate public institution such as Princeton University Library." The Records were subsequently acquired by Princeton University Library and then librarian Julian P. Boyd.
Collection
Online
Fight for Freedom (Organization)
Fight for Freedom, Inc. (FFF), a national citizen's organization established in April 1941, was a leading proponent of full American participation in World War II. Believing that the war was a threat to American freedom and security, FFF boldly and vehemently championed the interventionist cause, advocating that all necessary measures must be taken to insure the defeat of Adolf Hitler and the German Army. In addition, FFF worked to preserve fundamental American freedoms at home. An offshoot of the Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies, FFF was supported by average citizens, as well as prominent educators, labor leaders, authors and playwrights, clergy, stage and screen actors, newspaper men, and politicians. Acting as a clearinghouse for information related to American intervention in World War II, FFF monitored the activities of the leading isolationist organization, the America First Committee, and many of its key individuals such as Charles A. Lindbergh, Burton Wheeler, and Gerald Nye. From its headquarters in New York City, FFF spread its message through an extensive network of state and local branches, as well as through heavy reliance on local newspaper editors supportive of the interventionist cause. Pearl Harbor effectively ended the isolationist-interventionist debate, and by early 1942 FFF had disbanded.
Collection

Helmut Meyer Papers, 1938-2000
C1039
16 boxes 16.4 linear feet

Meyer, Helmut, 1912-2004
Helmut Meyer was a German-born American citizen who fought for the United States in World War II and founded the Helmut Meyer Literary Agency in New York City. The collection contains files from the Helmut Meyer Literary Agency, propaganda from both the Allies and the Axis from World War II, manuscripts of Meyer's own work, and correspondence from friends and clients.
Collection

Louis Adamic Papers, 1848-1951 (mostly 1921-1951)
C0246
113 boxes 6 items 58.5 linear feet

Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Louis Adamic was an author deeply concerned with American immigrants and their experiences in the "melting pot." This collection consists of papers of Adamic, including manuscripts of his books, short stories, articles, and lectures, as well as sketches, paste-ups, and proofs of Adamic's own journal T & T. Also included are correspondence, subject files, and works of other writers.
Collection
Princeton University. Princeton Listening Center.
The Records of the Princeton Listening Center (1939-1941) consist of transcripts of Axis and Allied propaganda broadcasts monitored by the Listening Center staff from November 1939 through May 1941 until the operations of the Center were taken over by the Federal Communications Commission of the United States government. Also included are subject and research files of the organization, as well as reports published by the members.