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Series 1, Subseries 1: Bylaws and Minutes, 1941-1994

3 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
Series 1, Subseries 1: Bylaws and Minutes, 1941-1994, contains two distinct sets of minutes: the Board of Trustees meetings and the Executive Committee meetings. In accordance with the bylaws, the board was to meet at least once every three months exclusive of July and August. From 1970 on, this requirement was met or exceeded. However, prior to1970 meetings seem to have occurred once in the winter, usually in February, and once in the fall, usually in October. Where extant, notices and agendas are included with the minutes. The content of the minutes can be broken down into two parts. One part concerns the everyday administrative operations of Freedom House such as nominating new board members, discussing fund raising, reviewing committee work, deciding who would receive the Freedom Award, as well as the mundane tasks of managing the upkeep of the Willkie Memorial Building. The other material in the minutes concerns policy matters. Recorded here are board member discussions related to current events, such as the nuclear test ban treaty, the war in Vietnam, and, in general, dialogue regarding American foreign policy.
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Series 1, Subseries 2: Meeting Materials, 1941-1992 supplements the minutes of the Board of Trustees and Executive Committee by providing detailed information on matters discussed at these meetings. Meeting Materials for the early years focus on establishing the organization with an emphasis on enlisting the proper individuals for the Board of Trustees, finding financial support, and establishing operations in the Willkie Memorial Building. Information was sent to each board member prior to meetings and could include clippings, memoranda, committee reports, open letters to government agencies, policy statements, notification of conferences, and activity reports. Researchers should note that the folders for 1979-1981 contain comprehensive descriptions of Freedom House projects called Activities Reports that list all the activities of Freedom House in those years and describe in detail the wide variety of interests of the organization.
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Series 1, Subseries 3: Correspondence, 1941-1993

13 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
Series 1, Subseries 3: Correspondence, 1941-1993, contains the correspondence of individual board members followed by the various committees of the board. It includes correspondence, speeches, articles, memoranda, reports and biographical information on each board member. The board member correspondence highlights the relationship between the individual members and the administration of the organization. The board consisted of such notables as William Agar, Zbigniew Brzezinski, Clifford Case, Leo Cherne, Paul Douglas, Roscoe Drummond, Harry Gideonse, Sidney Hook, Jacob Javits, Max Kampelman, Jeane Kirkpatrick, Bette Bao Lord, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, John Richardson, Bayard Rustin, Margaret Chase Smith, Rex Stout, Herbert Bayard Swope, Dorothy Thompson, Walter White, Roy Wilkins, and Wendell Willkie.
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Series 1, Subseries 4: Policy Statements, 1942-1993

4 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
Series 1, Subseries 4: Policy Statements, 1942-1993, includes some statements that were sporadically released to major newspapers, while others were made available only through sale by Freedom House. Policy statements can also be found among the various board minutes, meeting materials, pamphlets and in the Freedom House Newsletter. The files consist of correspondence, drafts, and memoranda on a wide variety of issues including Vietnam, Nixon and his Presidency, affirmative action, and South Africa, as well as other domestic and foreign policy issues. In issuing these statements, Freedom House hoped to provide a broad context for examining important policy issues, thus highlighting the correlation between policy and the United States' domestic, social and political ethos. The policy statements aroused support and opposition from both ends of the political spectrum.
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Series 2, Subseries 3: Financial Records, 1941-1992

4 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
Series 2, Subseries 3: Financial Records, 1941-1992, contains statements, ledgers, correspondence, publications and other information documenting the organization's financial history and its fund raising program. This documentation primarily includes annual statements prepared by Freedom House's auditors, and correspondence with contributors. Additional financial information can be found in the minutes, meeting materials, and correspondence subseries of the Board of Trustees series.
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Series 3: Willkie Memorial Building, 1940-1987

4 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
Series 3: Willkie Memorial Building, 1944-1987, houses a variety of correspondence related to the purchase, maintenance and sale of the building. The building was purchased and renovated with funds subscribed by the original supporters of Freedom House. It was dedicated to the memory of Willkie on October 8, 1945. Unable to maintain the building financially, Freedom House was forced to sell it in 1985, setting off a firestorm of protest from the occupants. Lawsuits were filed to block the sale, but to no avail. Located in Meeting Materials of the Board of Trustees is more information regarding the sale of the building. During its 40-year existence, the building housed non-profit organizations that engaged in advancing a free society. Such renowned organizations as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the National Citizens Council on Civil Rights used the Willkie building for their offices.
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Series 4, Subseries 2: Radio and Television Broadcasts, 1941-1988, contains correspondence and scripts of Freedom House's broadcasts from 1942 through 1988. The content of the broadcasts corresponds with the major issues of the day such as fascism, communism and civil rights. Major programs include Our Secret Weapon with Rex Stout as the "lie detective" debunking Axis propaganda; Freedom House Forum; and Pride and Prejudice, a forum for representatives of different races and religions to discuss issues of prejudice. Many of these successful radio broadcasts became television programs in the 1950s and 1960s.
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Series 4, Subseries 3: Conferences and In-Service, 1942-1994, houses transcripts, correspondence, memoranda, agendas, and papers which detail various conferences, round-tables and in-service programs sponsored by Freedom House. Conference topics ranged from "Problem Areas Affecting Freedom" to "Youth Rebellion." Among the larger conferences are the Asian Policy Conference held in Tuxedo, New York, the Conference on U.S.-Soviet Relations, and Freedom House's In-Service course for New York teachers, which ran from 1965-1972.
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Series 5: Awards and Celebrations, 1942-1993, mainly contains correspondence, clippings, speeches, programs, invitations, and other information regarding the annual Freedom Award ceremonies. The award was created in 1943 to honor outstanding contributions to the cause of human liberty. It was presented continuously from 1943 until 1977. Honorees included Sumner Welles, George C. Marshall, Matthew B. Ridgway, U.N. Soldiers in Korea, and the Arkansas Gazette. The tradition was revived in 1991 with awards presented to the Dalai Lama and Vaclav Havel. It should be noted that letters from award recipients pre-dating 1967 were replaced with photocopies in these files. However, the originals can be found in the George Field Files (MC#048).