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File

Voting, 1946-1970

42 boxes 1 folder
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
The records related to voting rights compose the majority of the Operating Files. References are made throughout this portion of the collection to 1971(a) and 1971(b), which are sections of the 1957 Civil Rights Act. 1971(a) violations involved the use of poll taxes, literacy tests, and other means to keep black citizens from voting. In 1971(b) cases, counties used intimidation and threats to suppress voting rights.
File

Subseries A: Operating Files, 1926-2005

94 boxes 1 folder
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
The Operating Files reflect some of the main types of discriminatory practices and behaviors that John Doar and the Civil Rights Division targeted during the civil rights movement, particularly in the South. The majority of materials in the series relate to protecting voting rights and enforcing school desegregation; other issues compose a comparatively small portion of the series.
File

Subseries F: Special Files, 1940-1967

12 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
This subseries pertains to events, organizations, and institutions that were monitored by the Civil Rights Division. Doar and others in the Division designated these materials as "special files" (distinct from the Operating Files, which relate to broader civil rights issues). The majority of this subseries documents the various demonstrations that took place during the civil rights movement, usually in the form of government reports and memoranda. Most of these files focus on demonstrations in specific cities, though the Selma to Montgomery march and the march led by James Meredith in 1966 (often referred to as the March Against Fear) are also documented. In addition, the subseries includes the Division's research files on the Ku Klux Klan and several circuit and district courts, along with court records and other materials related to the United States' case against Judge William Harold Cox.
Folder

Series 1: Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, 1926-2005

146 boxes 1 folder
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
Series 1 documents John Doar's work within the Civil Rights Division and the Division's activities and organizational structure from its inception in 1957 through 1967, though most materials date from the 1960s. The majority of the series is made up of operating files from the investigation and litigation of civil rights violations in specific areas, such as voting and elections, education, public accommodations and public facilities, employment, violent crimes, and others. A large portion of the collection also relates to the administration of the Division, including records on matters such as the Division's budget, personnel, and internal management. To a lesser extent, the series contains files on other agencies with civil rights responsibilities in the federal government, as well as files on non-governmental activist organizations. "Special files" in the series provide insight into other areas of interest to the Division not explicitly included in the operating files, while materials related to proposed or approved legislation indicate the Division's priorities and its responses to new mandates. A number of government publications and scholarly articles collected by Doar are also present.
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Series 3: New York City Board of Education, 1944-1972

35 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
Series 3 contains John Doar's records from his time on the New York City Board of Education, including occasional Board materials that predate his tenure. Most of these earlier materials were interspersed with Doar's working files, though a small number of the subject files of Bernard Donovan, who served as superintendent of schools from 1965-1969, were maintained separately.
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Series 5: Later Activities, 1905 June-2013

38 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
Series 5 documents Doar's legal career in private practice and his continued interest in civil rights matters from the 1960s. The majority of the series is composed of court documents pertaining to the investigation Doar led in the 1980s into the bribery charges laid against United States District Judge Alcee Hastings. A few other cases are also documented, though to a much lesser extent.
Folder

Series 1, Subseries 1: Bylaws and Minutes, 1941-1994

3 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
Series 1, Subseries 1: Bylaws and Minutes, 1941-1994, contains two distinct sets of minutes: the Board of Trustees meetings and the Executive Committee meetings. In accordance with the bylaws, the board was to meet at least once every three months exclusive of July and August. From 1970 on, this requirement was met or exceeded. However, prior to1970 meetings seem to have occurred once in the winter, usually in February, and once in the fall, usually in October. Where extant, notices and agendas are included with the minutes. The content of the minutes can be broken down into two parts. One part concerns the everyday administrative operations of Freedom House such as nominating new board members, discussing fund raising, reviewing committee work, deciding who would receive the Freedom Award, as well as the mundane tasks of managing the upkeep of the Willkie Memorial Building. The other material in the minutes concerns policy matters. Recorded here are board member discussions related to current events, such as the nuclear test ban treaty, the war in Vietnam, and, in general, dialogue regarding American foreign policy.
Folder
Series 1, Subseries 2: Meeting Materials, 1941-1992 supplements the minutes of the Board of Trustees and Executive Committee by providing detailed information on matters discussed at these meetings. Meeting Materials for the early years focus on establishing the organization with an emphasis on enlisting the proper individuals for the Board of Trustees, finding financial support, and establishing operations in the Willkie Memorial Building. Information was sent to each board member prior to meetings and could include clippings, memoranda, committee reports, open letters to government agencies, policy statements, notification of conferences, and activity reports. Researchers should note that the folders for 1979-1981 contain comprehensive descriptions of Freedom House projects called Activities Reports that list all the activities of Freedom House in those years and describe in detail the wide variety of interests of the organization.
Folder

Series 1, Subseries 3: Correspondence, 1941-1993

13 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
Series 1, Subseries 3: Correspondence, 1941-1993, contains the correspondence of individual board members followed by the various committees of the board. It includes correspondence, speeches, articles, memoranda, reports and biographical information on each board member. The board member correspondence highlights the relationship between the individual members and the administration of the organization. The board consisted of such notables as William Agar, Zbigniew Brzezinski, Clifford Case, Leo Cherne, Paul Douglas, Roscoe Drummond, Harry Gideonse, Sidney Hook, Jacob Javits, Max Kampelman, Jeane Kirkpatrick, Bette Bao Lord, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, John Richardson, Bayard Rustin, Margaret Chase Smith, Rex Stout, Herbert Bayard Swope, Dorothy Thompson, Walter White, Roy Wilkins, and Wendell Willkie.
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Series 1, Subseries 4: Policy Statements, 1942-1993

4 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
Series 1, Subseries 4: Policy Statements, 1942-1993, includes some statements that were sporadically released to major newspapers, while others were made available only through sale by Freedom House. Policy statements can also be found among the various board minutes, meeting materials, pamphlets and in the Freedom House Newsletter. The files consist of correspondence, drafts, and memoranda on a wide variety of issues including Vietnam, Nixon and his Presidency, affirmative action, and South Africa, as well as other domestic and foreign policy issues. In issuing these statements, Freedom House hoped to provide a broad context for examining important policy issues, thus highlighting the correlation between policy and the United States' domestic, social and political ethos. The policy statements aroused support and opposition from both ends of the political spectrum.