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Collection

Arthur H. Thornhill Papers, 1987-2003 (mostly 1930-1992)

C0882 19 boxes 9 linear feet
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
Thornhill, Arthur H. (Arthur Horace), 1924-
Contains selected papers, photographs, and memorabilia of Arthur H. Thornhill, Jr., Princeton Class of 1946, pertaining to his publishing career at Little, Brown and Company and his involvement in a variety of organizations and activities within the publishing industry. Also present in the collection is a limited amount of material from Thornhill's father, Arthur H. Thornhill, Sr., who preceded his son as president of Little, Brown and Company.
Collection

Arthur Krock Papers, 1909-1974 (mostly 1930-1974)

MC079 96 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
Krock, Arthur, 1886-1974
Arthur Krock (1886-1974) had a long and distinguished career as a journalist, working for much of his career as Washington correspondent and columnist for The New York Times. His column "In the Nation" was noted for its depth of information and analysis, especially on American politics. The Krock papers document his journalism career, especially with The New York Times, and include his correspondence, his writings, and biographical materials.
Collection
Link, Arthur S. (Arthur Stanley) (1920-1998)
Arthur S. Link was an author, editor, scholar and publisher, but is best known as the leading historian on Woodrow Wilson and for his leadership over the publication of Wilson's papers. This collection consists of the personal papers of Link, which includes articles, correspondence, notes, office files, and presidency records of the American Historical Association.
Collection
Association on American Indian Affairs
The Records of the Association on American Indian Affairs document the corporate life of an influential and resilient player in the history of twentieth-century Native American advocacy. From its formation by non-Indians in New York in 1922 to its re-establishment in South Dakota in 1995 under a wholly Indian administration, the AAIA has defended the rights and promoted the welfare of Native Americans and, in this process, has shaped the views of their fellow citizens. The AAIA has waged innumerable battles over the years, touching on the material and spiritual well-being of Indians in every state of the Union: from the right of Native Americans to control their resources to their right to worship freely; from their right to federal trusteeship to their right to self-determination. The evolving nature of this struggle, in terms of conception and execution; the environment in which it was waged, both within and without the AAIA; the parade of men and women who figured in it; and the relationships among them can all be found in the abundant and insightful records which constitute these Records. The correspondence, minutes, reports, articles, clippings, and other documents in the collection, augmented by photographic and audiovisual material, represent a window not only on the AAIA but on the entities and personalities with which it interacted. While its vision has co-existed with others, and while it has been far from alone in its contribution to Indian life, no consideration of twentieth-century Native American affairs can disregard its arduous and, for the most part, fruitful work.