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Subseries 7F: Financial Materials, includes correspondence, receipts, invoices, and statements documenting Stevenson's finances. This documentation primarily includes income tax returns and investment information. Stevenson's investments were predominantly in communications, including the Daily Pantagraph and the Bloomington Broadcasting Company, gas and oil speculation, and farms. From the late 1950s until his death, Stevenson was involved in a number of joint investments with his three sons, primarily oil wells. His farm investments were primarily inheritances from his parents that he shared with his sister, Elizabeth Stevenson Ives. The one exception to this generalization was his farm in Libertyville, Illinois that he maintained as his primary residence even when he spent the majority of his time in Chicago and New York. The correspondence with the caretakers and local tradespeople reveals his devotion to this property.
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Subseries 7I: Memberships includes correspondence and membership cards for social, political, and benevolent organizations to which Stevenson belonged. He frequently wrote letters of support for his friends and associates who sought membership in some of the clubs to which he belonged. His affiliations with some of the organizations, such as Hull House, Century Association, and Onwentsia Club, spanned most of his adult life. He belonged to other organizations, particularly those which gave him honorary memberships, for only a short period of time.
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Subseries 7J: Memorabilia, includes invitations, programs, place cards, magazine covers, keys to cities, and other items that Stevenson designated for inclusion in his scrapbooks, but never were. As with other materials, these items reflect his rapid ascendancy in prominence. Early in his public career, he tended to save more items; as he gained greater prominence he clearly was not as easily impressed with the recognition and adulation he received. The memorabilia also includes guest lists, invitations, and toasts from his birthday parties, thrown annually by his wide circle of friends beginning with his fiftieth birthday. A guest book records visitors to Stevenson's various residences, including the Illinois governor's mansion, Libertyville farm, and his suite in the Waldorf Astoria. Clearly, the guest book was not signed by every visitor; however, it does give a flavor of his guests over the years.
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Series 8: Scrapbooks includes microfilm copies of Stevenson's 108 scrapbook volumes, containing newsclippings and memorabilia documenting his personal and political activities. Beginning in 1952, many of the scrapbooks were compiled by Edith Gifford, a Stevenson supporter who worked for a clipping service. Thus, the post-1952 scrapbooks are uniform in size and arrangement, primarily documenting Stevenson's public activities. Earlier scrapbooks contain clippings about Stevenson's family and social activities. The scrapbooks reflect Stevenson's abrupt elevation in stature; the first four volumes cover the years 1922-1951, while later volumes each cover one or two months. A few of the volumes are devoted to specific events or topics, such as Conservation in Illinois (Volume 4, 1951) and the Cuban Missile Crisis (Volumes 105-107, 1962). The series also includes 7 additional scrapbooks which were not microfilmed, documenting his 1952 presidential campaign.
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Series 9: Travel Materials includes correspondence, notes, newspaper clippings, itineraries, background information, and memorabilia, such as invitations and place cards. The bulk of the material documents his 1953 world tour which started in March and ended in August. During this trip, Stevenson established many of the contacts he cultivated through the remainder of his public career. Subsequent trips were taken both for pleasure and for business. He made his 1957 trip to Africa as a representative of legal clients Reynolds Metals and Maurice Tempelsman, while his 1958 trip to the Soviet Union was a goodwill, fact-finding tour. His written impressions of Russia were syndicated by the North American Newspaper Alliance and later published as Friends and Enemies.