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File

"Dates"

1 folder
Box b-001914, Folder 2
Consists of an unbound notebook labeled by Peter Bien "Dates", which lists relevant information for each year given from 1889 to 1957. Included Bien's correspondence with editors and publishing houses regarding the publication of his book "Kazantzakis and Politics"; correspondence with Theofanis G. Stavrou, Giannēs Manōlikakēs, and Giōrgos Anemogiannēs; a xerox copy of an autograph letter to Eleni Kazantzaki signed by Peter Bien dated 1968; and a typescript of Bien's proposal for his book.
File
Box b-001913, Folder 4-5
Consists of Bien's primary readings notes from primary materials including typescripts of Nikos Kazantzakis, Eleni Kazantzaki, and other writers published works with Bien's handwritten annotations; typescripts of Kazantzakis' published articles to Greek newspapers such as "Nea Ephēmeris"; an index to epistles to Galateia; There are also autograph notes by Peter Bien.
Folder
Consists of Bien's primary readings notes including typescripts of Nikos Kazantzakis, Eleni Kazantzaki, and other writers published works with Bien's handwritten annotations; typescripts of Kazantzakis' published articles to Greek newspapers such as "Nea Ephēmeris"; an index to epistles to Galateia; There are also autograph notes by Peter Bien.
File
Box 1, Folder 5
Consists of a complete set of ten color military trade cards (part of a collection of forty drawings in four series) entitled "La Guerra entre Turquia y los Estados Balkanes by the Spanish company Chocolate Pi (Colección de 40 dibujos en 4 series), on verso. Images depict miscellaneous battles between Turkey and the Balkan States; one card depicts portraits of the monarchs of the allied states. All cards are numbered (1-10) and belong to "Series A"; printed title on recto and a epxlanatory note about the depiction on verso.
File
Box 3, Box 4
Consists of (90) black-and white lantern slides showing views of the city of Thessalonikē, a sea shore, the White Tower, panoramic views of the city after the fire, and Saint Sophia church. Included also are slides depicting scenes of daily life, such as rural people in front of a fountain, a Greek farm, woman at the loom, local women spinning cotton, peasants in the fileds, a priest standing in front of an altar, people going to a wedding, grinding wheat in a manual millstone, agricultural workers, livestock workers, group of Greek kids outside of their houses or in the fields, family portraits, man in Greek ethnic costume (foustanella), a Greek funeral; interiors of churches; a Turkish family; a Rumanian person on a horse; and stork nests on houses and trees. The majority of the lantern slides bear handwritten numbers: 1-21, 23-28, 30, 34-36, 38-39, 44-45, 47-57, 59-63, 65-83, 85-87, 89-91; the rest are unnumbered. Some of them bear handwritten titles in pen on top of the image.
File
Box 1, Folder 2
Consists of two album pages with six photographs mounted recto and verso, one to three per side (21.2 x 26.8 cm) Images depict general views of the Princes' Islands and Chalkē (Heybeli (İstanbul İli)); regattas in the Princes' Islands; and four portraits with traditional costumes. Captions, number and signature in negative or cardboard in French. Signed: B. Kargopoulo, Phot.
File
poems selected from the public domain by Lenore and illustrated by Erik whether to print jointly or separately with Hamish Hamilton (Julia MacRae) - business trouble at HH; also with Michael Brown re reproduction - misunderstanding about figured between production departments (David Rogers at Atheneum); delay of publication day due to printing in England exactly which poems to include and where to skip verses
File
Correspondence primarily between Bridgman, McElderry, and Judy Long regarding Bridgman's illustrated counting book All the Little Bunnies. Topics include the book's design, a Christmas story written by Bridgman, a potential project called "Lazy Lion and Little Dog," Bridgman's illustrations for a book by Joan Kahn, and Judy Long's wedding. There is additional correspondence with William Heinemann Ltd., Japan UNI and Xerox regarding foreign publishing and paperback editions of the book. File also includes a printer's proof of one of the illustrations.
File
working with Jonathan Lovat Dickson at Doubleday Canada shopping for English copublishers but no dice - tried Macmillian, Bodley Head and Julia McRae Children's books Francis Kagige illustrated MKM sends copies of Susan Cooper's books to Dickson's daughter, "book godmother" letter from a reader saying pages missing/out of order; MKM sends new copy includes materials related to cover illustration
File
story about the point at the end of the lion's tail correspondence begins with questions about whether this is a real Masai folktale (no, but based on creation myth); Margaret consulted with Harriet Brown, a black children's librarian, about whether this was an acceptable sort of thing hoping to work with Leo and Diane Dillon, husband and wife team of illustrators MKM read his children's novel, "The Star Tree"; also version of Sufi tale "The Prince and the Sorceress"; also picture book idea "There's An Elephant in the Garage" (published by Dutton), "The Magnificent Prin"; "The Secret in the Bottle" delay in schedule because of business of Dillons; eventually cancel contract in November 1978 -- too busy; Ron Himler instead finally -- line edits full mock-up of the book with notes from the designer Shopping to England and South Africa
File
Correspondence primarily between McElderry, Estes, McElderry's secretaries Florence Sczesny and Judy Long, and illustrator Susanne Suba about this story of a girl whose mother does not want the family to have a Christmas tree. The book was Estes's first with McElderry at Atheneum; the two had worked together when McElderry was at Harcourt Brace Jovanovich and the file includes correspodence with William Jovanovich regarding the Estes's requested release from her contract with the firm. Other topics of correspondence include much discussion of the book's drawings: McElderry and Estes considered Edward Ardizzone, Cyndy Szekeres, and Trina Schart Hyman before choosing Susanne Suba, and Estes was initially unhappy with the drawings, though she never communicated this to Suba. McElderry and Estes also discuss line edits to the manuscipt, trim size and font, and the terms of Estes's contract. Estes had recently moved to New Haven, CT, and she and McElderry talk about which bookshops to market to and how to get Estes involved at the Yale Co-Op. Other correspondence includes McElderry shopping the book to English publishers, including Bodley Head, Longman Young, Lutterworth Press, William Heinemann, and Ernest Benn, Ltd., and to Shigeo Watanabe and the Charles E. Tuttle, Co. in Japan. Oxford University Press eventually bought the English rights, and there are several letters between McElderry and editor Paul Binding; the two also discuss The Moon on the One Hand by Bill Crofut, OUP books McElderry would like to see, the possibility of doing a joint children's book project with Reynolds Price, and a late payment from OUP to Susanne Suba. Other promotional topics include the book's selection by the Junior Literary Guild, permission for Miller-Brody Productions to use images from it in a "Meet the Newbery Author" filmstrip, interest in a German translation from Obelisk, interest from Women's Day Magazine, and a letter from a schoolteacher asking for biographical information about Estes. In 1979, McElderry wrote to Estes to ask if Atheneum could lower her royalties in order to keep the book in print. Additional topics include whether Estes should get an agent to handle movie and television rights for her work, putting together a biographical pamphlet on Estes, and the launch party for Cricket Magazine. The two also talk about Estes's husband's various accidents and health issues and the death of her brother Clarence, as well as Lucy Boston's chapter on McElderry's wedding in her book Memory of a House.
File
Correspondence primarily between McElderry, Estes, McElderry's secretary, and later editor, Judy Long, and illustrator Jacqueline Ayer regarding this story about a girl who loses her father's umbrella in New York City's Chinatown. Topics include McElderry's general suggestions for the manuscript, line edits, and layout for the book, as well as the time crunch to publish by fall 1978 (Estes had hoped to work in person with both McElderry and Ayer, but time did not permit). Before McElderry and Estes chose Ayer as the illustrator, they considered Sag Harbor-based artist Joan Baren; the file includes xeroxes of her character sketches, but Estes found the drawings too stylized and potentially racially offensive. Also included are a map of Kim's home drawn by Estes (undated), and a limerick written by Estes in response to McElderry's request for flap copy, which Estes did not like to write (Dec. 30, 1977). The book was published in England by Oxford Univeristy Press, and there is correspondence with Antony Kamm, children's book editor; Oetinger Verlag in Hamburg was interested in the German rights. McElderry and Estes also discuss whether Estes will allow the Foundry Bookstore in New Haven, CT, to throw her a publication party. The final letter in the file discusses Estes's displeasure with some of Ayer's illustrations, as well as plans for The Moffat Museum, published by Harcourt, Brace World in 1983. Personal topics include Estes's son-in-law Stephen's brain tumor, her husband's many health problems, and her cancelled 1978 trip to Madrid and Tangiers with a visit to authors Virginia Sorensen and Alec Waugh. McElderry and Estes also discuss the delay in McElderry's work after her husband's death, and the honorary degree she received from Mt. Holyoke College in 1978. There are also a number of letters between McElderry and Ayer, discussing Ayer's world travels and a sum of money she owed to McElderry.
File
Correspondence primarily between McElderry, Flora and Judy Long regarding this humurous adventure story written and illustrated by Flora. Topics of correspondence include line edits, reviews of Flora's previous book Grandpa's Ghost Stories, whether Flora would represent Atheneum at the "New York is Book Country" street fair, interest in Wanda from Metheun in England, and a request for advice from Flora regarding his daughter Roussie's writing career.
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Correspondence primarily between McElderry, Goldsmith and Paula Schwartz, regarding this novel about a girl who is left in charge of the house while her father is away. Topics include general changes and line edits from Schwartz, discussion about the jacket by Elise Primavera, interest from a publisher in South Africa, and McElderry's expression of continued interest in Goldsmith's work.
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Correspondence primarily between McElderry, executive editor Judy Long, Goodall and Richard Garnett at Macmillan London regarding this pictorial autobiography of Goodall's life from birth to his enlistment in World War II. The correspondents sometimes use "Before I Was Thirty-One" as a working title. Like An Edwardian Summer, the book began as a gift for Goodall's wife. Topics of correspondence include how many copies of the book Atheneum will take from Macmillan, pricing, the book's title, differences between the British and American editions, how to handle a budget overage, interest in Japanese rights from the Japan Uni Agency and McEdlerry's frustrations with Garnett, whom she called "eccentric" (3 February 1981). The file also includes discussion of how to cover up a racist Hitchy Koo doll in one of Goodall's illustrations. Many other Goodall projects are discussed, including An Edwardian Season, Edwardian Entertainments, Victorians Abroad, John S. Goodall's Theatre: Sleeping Beauty, Shrewbettina and Paddy Pork pop up books, and a proposed project called "The Story of Emily" or "The Red House." McElderry, Goodall and Garnett also discuss the UK's political and economic troubles of 1981 and how they might affect the publishing industry. The book went out of print in 1986.
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Correspondence primarily between McElderry, Goodall and Macmillan London's Richard Garnett discussing this sequal to An Edwardian Summer. Topics include McElderry's suggestion that the volume depict winter and not just Christmas, discussion of when Goodall's busy schedule would permit him to work on the paintings, and the enthusiastic reception of An Edwardian Summer in England. Goodall and McElderry also discuss Goodall's work on Story of An English Village and what would eventually become Goodall's Theatre: The Sleeping Beauty. File contains a black and white xerox of the entire volume. McElderry also corresponds with Goodall about the illness of Macmillan employee A.D. Maclean's son and the election of Jimmy Carter.
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Correspondence primarily between McElderry, Judy Long, Goodall, and Richard Garnett of Macmillan London about this book of paintings depicting the "season," that is the "period of three months... when aristocracy and wealthy classes converged on London to be near the Court" during the reign of King Edward (from volume's historical "Note"). Topics include whether or not Atheneum will be included in Macmillan's initial printing run, whether to print in Hong Kong or in England, delay of American release from Spring to Fall of 1980, and the shipment of preview copies twice being lost in the mail. There are also letters between McElderry and Michael Wace at Macmillan concerning the firms' ongoing disagreement about payment schedules. Many of Goodall's other titles are discussed, including Edwardian Summer, Paddy's New Hat, Paddy Pork's Holiday, Goodall's Theatre: The Sleeping Beauty, Story of an English Village, Lavinia's Cottage, Victorians Abroad, and Surprise Picnic. McElderry, Goodall and representatives from Macmillan also discuss a number of ideas for new books by Goodall, including Edwardian Entertainments, a Paddy Pork pop-up book, a project called "Escapade," which McElderry decided not to publish, and what would eventually become Before the War, here referred to as "Before I was Thirty-One." Additionally, there are letters of introduction between McElderry and Felicity Trotman, who became director of children's books at Macmillan in February, 1980, and some discussion of Atheneum's purchase by Scribner's. In a June 15, 1979 letter to Goodall, McElderry confirms the correct pronunciation of her last name.
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Correspondence primarily between McElderry, Galbraith and illustrator Diane Dawson (later Hearn) regarding Galbraith's first book, a picture book about the imaginative play of a girl with chicken pox. Early correspondence includes conversation with Christine Littman of the Donnell Library, whom McElderry asked to review the manuscript. Before settling on Dawson as the illustrator, McElderry and Galbraith also discussed using Jim Arnosky, Brinton Turkle, and Troy Howell (the file includes samples of his work). Correspondence between McElderry and Dawson centers around jacket design and Dawson's dissatisfaction with her own work; there are also several letters regarding Dawson's application to the Community Club of St. Bartholomew's Church on 50th St. in Manhattan. Other general topics include shopping the book to English publishers, interest from Parabel Verlag in Zurich, and the paperback book club edition of the title published by Xerox. McElderry and Galbraith also discuss other projects of Galbraith's, including Katie Did! and Come Spring, both published later by Atheneum, as well as Galbraith's concern over the sales figures for Spots are Special!
File
Correspondence between McElderry, Judy Long as executive editor, and Haldane regarding this proposed photo book about the design and building of the Statue of Liberty. The file includes letters with Haldane's idea for the book, photocopies of photographs she hoped to use, sample text by Tom Hyman, an unsigned contract and a specifications sheet listing expected size, number of pages, number of photographs, etc. The file also includes a letter to Marion Bell of Scribner Book Store soliciting an opinion on how such a book would compare with others on the market. The book was never published.
File
Correspondence primarily between McElderry, Hale, Hale's agent Laura Cecil, and Felicity Trotman of Macmillan London, regarding this picture book about a teddy bear who asks his owner to make him some clothes. The file includes several typescripts with McElderry's pencilled-in notes, a photocopy of Hale's initial dummy, photocopies of the cover art, five color slides of finished artwork, and copy of finalized jacket. Topics of correspondence include sizing of Hale's artwork to ensure accurate printing, whether the pages should have a color border, which typeface to use, whether the book will be printed by South China Printing Co. or in England, how McElderry and Trotman will commuicate effectively with each other and Hale, and artwork from the book being included in the 18th Exhibition of International Children's Picture Books put on by Shiko-Sha Co. in Japan. The correspondents also discuss Hale's other titles, Donkey's Dreadful Day and Chocolate Mouse and Sugar Pig, as well as author Nicki Daly and John S. Goodall's Above and Below Stairs, Story of an English Village and Paddy Goes Traveling. McElderry and Trotman discuss a large anti-nuclear rally in New York City and the Falkland's War.
File
Folder contains primarily business correspondence with/regarding the following individuals: Irina Hale (author/illustrator), Laura Cecil (her agent in the UK), Marni Hodgkin and Diane Denney (MacMillan London) and Hiroshi Imamura (Kaisei-Sha Publishers). The book had both US and UK editions, and was co-printed with Kaisei-Sha of Japan. Correspondence includes several versions of the full text, xeroxes of the illustrations, conversations about edits to both story and pictures, discussion of printing costs, variances between English and American spelling and punctuation, McElderry's meeting with Irina Hale at the Bologna Book Fair, discussion of future projects (Donkey and Brown Bear), trouble finding distributors for the book, anxiety over a delay in receiving films and copies of the work from England, early reviews of the work, and a remainder notice from 1983. Correspondence between McElderry and Cecil also references Harold Jones's There And Back Again and other Bunby books, Niki Daly's Vim the Rag Mouse, Edward Ardizzone's Hans Anderson, and authors Alec Lea and Simon Watson. Correspondence between McElderry and the team at MacMillan London also references John Goodall's An English Village, Ballooning Adventures of Paddy Pork and Creepy Castle, Joan Phipson's When the City Stopped, and Sylvia Fair's The Bedspread.