Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Date range 1945 Remove constraint Date range: <span class="single" data-blrl-single="1945">1945</span>

Search Results

Folder
The Woodrow Wilson Honorary Debate Panel (commonly abbreviated WWHDP) named after the 28th President of the United States, who was the Speaker of the American Whig Society while an undergraduate at Princeton, was founded in 1940 in order to recognize exceptional prowess in debate among undergraduates in Whig-Clio. Originally membership to this society was determined solely by election of the current members while its activities consisted mostly of an annual banquet in their honor. At some point which the documents do not make clear, this changed, and WWHDP took over responsibility for running the various prize debates and contests sponsored by Whig-Clio and membership is now gained by winning a prize in one of these contests.
Folder
Jonathan Dickinson, born in 1688 and graduated from Yale College in 1706, was the first president of the College of New Jersey. After becoming the pastor of the Congregational church in Elizabethtown, New Jersey, Dickinson shifted from Congregational to Presbyterian teachings in order to join the Presbytery of Philadelphia. Yet while becoming a leader within the Presbytery and the higher Synod of Philadelphia, Dickinson steadfastly maintained his belief in the freedom of the individual clergy. Having first envisioned an educational institute within the Synod, Dickinson only realized his dream of founding a school to train future Presbyterian ministers and pious laymen when he and others founded the College of New Jersey in 1746. Dickinson died in office in October 1747.
Folder

Series 2: Aaron Burr, Sr. Records, 1753-1999

2 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
While Jonathan Dickinson bears the distinction of serving as Princeton University's first president, Aaron Burr played a central part in organizing the College after its initial establishment and overseeing its move to Princeton in 1756. Burr was born in Fairfield, Connecticut in c. 1715/1716 and graduated at the head of his Yale College class in 1735. From there he moved to Newark, New Jersey to head both the Presbyterian church and a school in classics. Burr, along with Dickinson and five others, established the College of New Jersey in 1746. In 1748 Burr was named president of the college, though he had filled this office unofficially since Dickinson's death in 1747. During Burr's ten years of service he increased enrollment, raised much-needed funds, presided over the erection of Nassau Hall, and instructed the first classes of students to graduate from the College of New Jersey.
Folder
Jonathan Edwards succeeded his son-in- law, Aaron Burr, Sr., to become the third president of the College of New Jersey in September 1757. Edwards studied theology at Yale College, preached in the Presbyterian Church, and is remembered for his belief that only the truly converted should receive Communion, rather than all baptized persons. However, his proposal along these lines led to his dismissal from the Northampton, Massachusetts Presbyterian church in 1750, after which he passed his days serving as a missionary and writing with a passion. Edwards accepted the office of president with some reluctance but continued to preach actively from the College's pulpit. He died in March 1758 after being inoculated for smallpox, just six months into his tenure. His three sons and eight daughters survived him.
Folder
Having declined the presidency of the College of New Jersey in 1758, Samuel Davies accepted it in 1759 with a reluctance akin to that of his predecessor, Jonathan Edwards. Davies, who thought that his successor, Samuel Finley, was the right man for the job, was urged to take the position, even though some of the College's trustees shared his high opinion of Finley. Born in 1724 in Summit Ridge, Delaware and educated both at home and in the Rev. Samuel Blair's seminary, Davies received his license to preach in 1746 in Newcastle, Delaware. Ordained the following year as an evangelist to Virginia, he went on to serve as the first moderator of the Presbytery of Hanover, encompassing all the Presbyterian ministers in Virginia and North Carolina. At the request of the trustees, Davies traveled to Great Britain with Gilbert Tennent in 1753 to raise funds for the College. Among other uses, the donations collected abroad served to fund the construction of Nassau Hall and the president's house. As president and professor at the College of New Jersey, he was renowned for his emphasis on public service.
Folder
As president of the College of New Jersey, Samuel Finley is known for increasing enrollment and for his popularity as a teacher. Finley was born in 1715 in Armagh County, Ireland. On immigrating to America in 1734, he immediately began to educate himself with the goal of becoming a minister and was ordained in 1740 in New Brunswick, New Jersey. During his seventeen years as pastor of the church of Nottingham, Maryland, he oversaw its educational academy. Early in his career, Finley preached in a contentious manner, very much in keeping with the spirited religious revivals of the Great Awakening, but he later moderated his tone. He received an honorary degree from the University of Glasgow before becoming the fifth president of the College of New Jersey in June 1761, serving in this role until his death in July 1766.
Folder
John Witherspoon arrived in America from Scotland in 1768 having been persuaded by the trustees and then medical student Benjamin Rush to assume the presidency of the College of New Jersey. After declining initially, Witherspoon, a graduate of the University of Edinburgh, became one of the most popular and influential presidents in Princeton University's history. Witherspoon served not only Princeton, but also the nascent United States as a member of the Continental Congress. During Witherspoon's tenure the College weathered the turmoil caused by the American Revolution: Nassau Hall sustained heavy damage, enrollment declined, and finances were precarious. In the wake of this conflict, Witherspoon's preaching tours increased enrollment, particularly from the southern United States, and he broadened the curriculum by his emphasis on English grammar and composition. He also obtained needed instruments of instruction such as books for the library and apparatus for scientific study (such as the Rittenhouse Orrery). Witherspoon advocated a well-rounded clergy, emphasizing the liberal education of students, rather than just religious instruction. It was his aspiration to produce men who would not only make exceptional clerics, but also outstanding statesmen. Witherspoon instructed many students who became notable for their contributions to state and federal government, including James Madison, Aaron Burr, Jr., William Smith Livingston, Andrew Kirkpatrick, and Ashbel Green. Part of Witherspoon's popularity and influence with both students and politicians derived from his ability to discuss the merits of contesting views, while using reason to reach an ultimate conclusion.
Folder
Samuel Stanhope Smith, born in 1751 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, was the first alumnus to become president of the College of New Jersey. His father, Robert Smith, taught him at the school he headed in Pequea, Pennsylvania until the age of sixteen, when Samuel entered the College of New Jersey as a junior. He graduated with honors in 1769 before returning to Pennsylvania to teach in his father's school. In 1771 he returned to Princeton to tutor and study theology under John Witherspoon. For health reasons, he left Princeton to work as a missionary in Virginia. In 1775 the seminary that later became Hampden-Sydney College was founded, and Smith became its president. Married to Ann Witherspoon, Witherspoon's daughter, Smith returned to Princeton in 1779 as a professor of moral philosophy, and his brother, John Blair Smith, replaced him as president of Hampden-Sydney College. On Witherspoon's death in 1794, Smith, who had become vice president in 1786, assumed the leadership of the College. After the Nassau Hall fire of 1802, he raised enough money not only to reconstruct the landmark but also to add two additional buildings. Unfortunately, a riot in 1807 led to the suspension of 125 students and a growing distrust on the part of trustees. Faculty resignations and a declining student body led to Smith's resignation in 1812.
Folder
Ashbel Green was born in 1762 in Hanover, New Jersey, the son of Jacob Green, a Presbyterian minister and a trustee of the College of New Jersey. Green studied under his father until the age of sixteen, before becoming a revolutionary soldier in 1778. He returned home in 1781 to prepare for college, and the following year he entered the junior class of the College of New Jersey. He graduated in 1783, delivering his class' valedictory before George Washington and other members of the Continental Congress. He remained at the College as a tutor and then as a professor of mathematics and natural philosophy until he received his license to preach in 1786, whereupon he assumed the role of junior pastor at the Second Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia. The year before he had married Elizabeth Stockton, a member of one of Princeton's most prominent families. In 1792 he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree by the University of Pennsylvania and was elected chaplain to the United States Congress. He was re-elected to this position several times until 1800, when Congress moved to Washington, D.C. Green returned to the College of New Jersey as its president in 1812 and held office until 1822, emphasizing religion and discipline. During his tenure, he was part of the planning committee for the Princeton Theological Seminary, and he remained closely associated with the Seminary until his death in 1848. He resigned the presidency in 1822 over differences with the Board of Trustees, returning to Philadelphia to become editor of the Christian Advocate.
Folder
This series is arranged topically and contains biographical and genealogical information, correspondence, and financial records. The correspondence folder contains two items in Carnahan's hand: the first is his acceptance of the presidency in 1823; the second is a report on the state of College in 1852. Also to be found is a letter from John Quincy Adams declining an invitation to attend the College's centennial celebrations, as well as various letters sent to Carnahan. Financial materials include treasurer's and president's vouchers and checks. Among the images in this series is a photograph of a portrait of Carnahan's wife, Mary Vandyke.
Folder
Subseries 10A: General Materials, 1774-1997 [bulk: 1855-1886], is arranged topically and contains indices; correspondence from former Secretary of the University Varnum Lansing Collins, notably between Collins and Agnes Maclean, Maclean's niece, on the subject of her uncle's papers; biographical information; gift descriptions; and financial records from Maclean's time. Of special interest in the biographical folder are the reprinted diary of a sophomore and the account of two students who saw President Lincoln in 1861, also in reprinted form. There is also a very brief and informal autobiography by Maclean that was written at the request of Professor Edward Duffield. This subseries also contains a letter referring to Maclean's inauguration, indentures, and post-mortem articles about Maclean's life and accomplishments. In addition, there is his wallet, his checkbook, containing stubs and a few blank checks, two scrolled genealogies of the Maclean and Bainbridge families, "The Clan Maclean" book, and a scrapbook. The scrapbook contains newspaper articles and letters to the editor referring to temperance from Maclean and other professors. Photographs of Maclean have been grouped with other presidential images and can be found in boxes 234 and 235.
Folder

Series 10: John Maclean, Jr. Records, 1752-1997

36 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
John Maclean, Jr. was the eldest of six children of John Maclean, Sr. and Phoebe Bainbridge. His father was born in Glasgow, studied for the medical profession, and became a surgeon. At 24, the elder Maclean immigrated to the United States for political reasons. He was invited to take the vacant chair of natural philosophy, which included chemistry, at the College of New Jersey, becoming the institution's first professor of chemistry. He married in 1797, and John was born on March 3, 1800. Entering the College of New Jersey as a sophomore, he graduated in 1816 as the youngest in his class. He taught for a few months in Lawrenceville, New Jersey before earning a divinity degree from the Princeton Theological Seminary. In 1818 he was appointed as a tutor of Greek at the College of New Jersey, beginning a long, varied, and devoted career at his alma mater. Four years later he was elected to fill the chair of mathematics and natural philosophy, though this did not prevent him from subsequently teaching languages and literature. Maclean also served as the College's librarian from 1824 until 1849.
Folder

Series 11: James McCosh Records, 1747-1995

10 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
James McCosh was the first president since John Witherspoon who was not an alumnus of the College of New Jersey. Many similarities have been noted between the two men. Both were born in Scotland and graduated from the University of Edinburgh. Witherspoon was inaugurated in 1768, and McCosh was inaugurated one hundred years later in 1868. They died one hundred years apart, almost to the day, and like all presidents until Woodrow Wilson, both were ministers.
Folder
Subseries 12A: General Materials, 1877-1994 [bulk: 1888-1932], is housed in boxes 40, 40A, 57, 238, and 239, the latter two comprising portraits. Biographical information is limited but does contain some interesting anecdotes, one of which is from a student from the class of 1899. A copy of an article about the David Swing trial is the only record from Patton's pre- Princeton years. Both his College of New Jersey and Princeton Theological Seminary inaugurations are documented, including a few letters about the preparations for these events. There is a copy of a paper on Patton's presidency from "The Aims of Education" course taught by President Harold T. Shapiro in the 1990s. There is also an article from The New York Observer that offers a complimentary perspective on Patton. Another item of interest can be found in the Honors/Portrait folder, in the form of a prayer that the then ex-president Patton offered when the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred on President Harding. The correspondence in this subseries is arranged in alphabetical order by author. If the author is unknown, the letter is filed under the addressee's name. There are numerous photographs of Patton, and it is interesting to note the change in his countenance, as his stark youthful features yielded to his older, kindlier appearance.
Folder
Francis Landey Patton served as president from 1888 to 1902 during an era of change and growth, reflected in the adoption of the name Princeton University in 1896. Born January 22, 1843 in Warwick, Bermuda in a house called Carberry, Patton was the eldest of three sons. His father died when he was six years old. Patton attended the Warwick Academy in Bermuda and graduated from Knox College at the University of Toronto in 1862 and from the Princeton Theological Seminary in 1865, the year in which he was ordained a Presbyterian minister. His first three pastorates were in the state of New York. In 1865 he married Rosa Antoinette Stevenson, with whom he had seven children.
Folder
Subseries 13A: Subject Files, 1898-1985 [bulk: 1902-1974], which can be found in boxes 57 and 61, is arranged topically and contains biographical, inaugural, familial, memorial, and commemorative information. There are speeches and writings by and about Wilson, including a recollection by Benjamin B. Chambers, Class of 1909, entitled "The Character of Woodrow Wilson;" invitations to events in his honor; a list of his honorary degrees; and information concerning his 1919 Pierce Arrow limousine. The Wilson Papers/Collection Location folder describes the mammoth project to collect and publish Wilson's papers that began in 1958 and was completed in 1993.
Folder

Series 13: Woodrow Wilson Records, 1896-1985

11 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
Born December 29, 1856 in Staunton, Virginia, Woodrow Wilson was the son of Joseph Ruggles Wilson, a Presbyterian minister trained at the Princeton Theological Seminary. His father sympathized with the South during the Civil War and was a leader in the Southern Presbyterian Church and a professor at the Columbia Theological and Southwestern Theological Seminaries. Woodrow was raised in Augusta, Georgia and Columbia, South Carolina. Born into a religious family, he accompanied his father on pastoral calls and edited minutes of the General Assembly. He attended Davidson College in his freshman year (1873-1874), and then prepared for entrance to the College of New Jersey, enrolling in 1875. An ambitious reading program offset his light course load. He became known as a leader, and his classmates elected him speaker of the American Whig Society, secretary of the Football Association, president of the Baseball Association, and managing editor of The Daily Princetonian. He graduated in 1879 and then studied law at the University of Virginia from 1879 to 1880 before briefly practicing in Atlanta, Georgia. Wilson's graduate work, undertaken between 1883 and 1886 in political science and history at Johns Hopkins University, culminated in a doctoral dissertation entitled Congressional Government. Wilson married Ellen Louise Axson of Rome, Georgia in 1885 and had three daughters. Ellen died in 1914, and he married Edith Bolling Galt in 1915.
Folder
Subseries 14A: Subject Files, 1806-1986 [bulk: 1912-1933], is organized by topic and contains biographical, familial, and testimonial material, particularly in regard to Hibben's inauguration and retirement, as well as his accidental death. Other folders document his long career at Princeton University. This subseries also contains a folder of philosophy lectures and notes and a folder of prayers, reflecting Hibben's professional duality.
Folder
Subseries 14D: Acting President Edward D. Duffield Records, 1871-1955 [bulk: 1929-1939], is arranged topically and includes biographical and post-mortem information, a modest amount of correspondence, three folders of addresses, a scrapbook of news clippings and photographs, and a variety of other items. The inclusion of this material reflects the fact that Princeton University's Board of Trustees had not found a new president when Hibben retired in June 1932, leading to Duffield's appointment as acting president. He filled this position until June 1933, when Harold W. Dodds took office. Images of Duffield can be found at the end of the collection in boxes 242 and 245.
Folder
Born in Peoria, Illinois April 19, 1861, John Grier Hibben was the son of the Rev. Samuel Hibben, a Union chaplain in the Civil War who died when John Grier Hibben was one year old, and Elizabeth Grier Hibben. Hibben graduated from the College of New Jersey in 1882. As a student, he was a junior orator, editor of the Bric-a- Brac, winner of the mathematical prize, sophomore honor prize, and the Class of 1861 prize. He was also valedictorian, class president, and received the J.S.K. fellowship in mathematics. Having completed a one-year post-graduate course at the University of Berlin, he attended the Princeton Theological Seminary from 1883 to 1886. During this time he temporarily took the place of Henry B. Fine, Class of 1880, as instructor in mathematics at the College of New Jersey, and he briefly taught French and German at the Lawrenceville School. Hibben was ordained a Presbyterian minister in 1887 and married Jenny Davidson of Elizabeth, New Jersey the same year. They had one daughter.