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Series 1, Organizations, 1896-1965, contains constitutions, by-laws, a ritual book, the formal charter, accounts of dinner meetings, and induction ceremonies, records of meetings (1897-1962), lists of members and officers, agendas, business meetings, annual and financial reports, minute books, form letters, and newspaper clippings which document the Princeton chapter's activities.
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Series 2, Correspondence, 1928-1969, contains correspondence dealing with subjects such as membership enquiries and requirements, dates of meetings, replacement of lost keys, and other administrative matters. Most letters are addressed to Dean Christian Gauss and Secretaries Glenn Jepsen, Foreman Acton, T. J. Luce, Douglas Brown, and William Shimer. Some of the highlights of the correspondence are letters concerning graduate students' eligibility for membership (which ceased after 1925), tax exemption status, and statements on athletics. The series further contains invitations to prominent scholars (including Robert Oppenheimer) to speak at the annual meetings.
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Box 2, Folder 1
OLIVER LA FARGE Papers and correspondence of Oliver La Farge (1901-1963), President of the Association on American Indian Affairs, regarding Taos Pueblo and early involvement with Blue Lake case.
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This collection of manuscript materials documents a significant part of the history of an important land title dispute between the Taos Pueblo Indians of northern New Mexico and the federal government. in creating tie Carson National Forest in 1906, Pr esident Theodore Roosevelt carved away thousands of acres of Taos Pueblo land. This land, viewed as sacred by the Indians, surrounded and included Blue Lake: a vital religious shrine in Pueblo religion. Sixty-four years passed before the United States ret urned the land to the Indians.Instrumental in the fight for the return of Blue Lake and the surrounding wilderness was Corinne Locker (1927 - ). Locker became involved in the Blue Lake case while serving as secretary to Oliver La Farge (1901-1963) in Santa Fe, during La Farge's tenure as President of the Association on American Indian Affairs (AAIA). At La Farge's death, Locker became Southwest Field Secretary for the Association and stepped up her involvement in the Blue Lake fight. in doing so, she worked closely with the members of Taos Pueblo, most notably Paul Bernal. When, in 1966, disputes arose between the Pueblo and its attorneys, Locker filed a report with the AA1A that addressed possible conflict of interest existing among lawyers for the tribe who also served on AAIA decision-making bodies. The report resulted in Locker's dismissal from her AAIA position.Shortly thereafter, Locker formed the National Committee for the return of the Blue Lake Lands in conjunction with Rufus Q. Poole, an Albuquerque attorney, Paul Bernal, and others. As Coordinator of the organization, Locker operated as an effective liaison from the tribe to the non-Taos world. The National Committee lobbied for congressional and administration support of Blue Lake's return to the Indians; it also engineered a fundraising and publicity drive. Locker also worked closely with William C. Schaab (1927- ), special attorney to the Pueblo in the Blue Lake campaign. Much of the work of the committee involved attempts to mitigate the opposition of New Mexico Senator Clinton P. Anderson (1895-1975) and the United States Forest Service.The Nixon administration endorsed Blue Lake restoration legislation in the summer of 1970. Later that year, a bill returning 48,000 acres of land, including Blue Lake, was signed into law. Corinne Locker was honored for her efforts on behalf of Taos Pueblo at a subsequent ceremony in New Mexico.The Corinne Locker Papers, originals and copies alike, include the correspondence of Oliver La Farge in regards to AAIA involvement with the Blue Lake case; correspondence and documents relating to Locker's involvement as Southwest Field Secretary; materials in regards to Locker's report addressing possible conflict of interest among Pueblo attorneys; correspondence regarding the founding and functioning of the National Committee for the Restoration of the Blue Lake Lands; considerable correspondence r elating to proposed Blue Lake Legislation; materials related to the opposition of Senator Clinton P. Anderson, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the U.S. Forest Service. There are also folders that pertain to miscellaneous activities of the AAIA in New Mexico and among the Pueblo Indians in particular. Locker's files were "working files," and their organization, for that purpose, has been largely been maintained. Readers will perhaps find it helpful to first read through the entire guide.
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Like other Taos Blue Lake collections at Princeton, the Rufus G. Poole Papers chronicle a portion of the fight by New Mexico's Taos Indians to regain land taken from them in the 1906 creation of the Carson National Forest.Rufus G. Poole (1902 - 1968), a New York attorney who had settled in New Mexico for health reasons, was a regional attorney for tie Association on American Indian Affairs when the Pueblo retained him as a special liaison to Senator Clinton P. Anderson (1895-1975') in 1966. Anderson, a powerful New Mexico Senator, was opposed to congressional legislation which would return large amounts of land to the Pueblo directly; his opposition was enough to keep Blue Lake restoration legislation bottled up in Senate committees. Poole was hired to mollify Anderson's strident opposition. Not until President Richard Nixon issued an endorsement of the Blue Lake restoration bill in 1970, however, was the Pueblo able to see its long fight come to a successful end.The Rufus G. Poole Papers include copies of Poole's correspondence regarding the Blue Lake case and his role as special attorney to the Pueblo. Also included are copies of materials relating to Poole's role as a founding member of the National Committee for the Restoration of the Blue Lake Lands. Poole and other Pueblo supporters founded the National Committee in 1967, following a break with the Association on American Indian Affairs, included in the collection are copies of correspondence exchanged between Poole and William C. Schaab (1927--), tie Albuquerque attorney who replaced Poole as special attorney (at Poole's suggestion). Documentation regarding tie history of the Blue Lake case, contained in Box 3, was prepared by Schaab.
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The General subseries consists of correspondence between the Princeton Prospect Foundation and the Princeton Prospect Foundation Board of Trustees, members and interested people, and Princeton University faculty and administration in regards to the role of the Foundation and its acceptance by the University. Also included are general memoranda and mailings by the Foundation inquiring about assistance for their cause. There are also reports completed by the Foundation in an effort to show the positive impact it has had on the Eating Clubs and the University. Also incorporated in this subseries are the minutes of the meetings of the Foundation Board of Trustees (including address and telephone lists of the trustees), and the bylaws and certificate of incorporation for the Foundation.
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The General subseries consists mainly of correspondence, memoranda, printed material, and reports that communicate the events and transformations that took place at the Tower Club. Some of these events were independent of the Princeton Prospect Foundation, but most are directly related to the Foundation. Also included are fundraising mailings sent to Tower Club members and alumni. The financial statements of the Tower Club are also incorporated into this subseries, as well as Tower Club newsletters. This subseries also contains operating procedures for the undergraduate officers of the Tower Club, compiled by former officers. There are also copies of the by-laws and certificate of incorporation for the Tower Club.
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The Board of Governors subseries is composed of the minutes of the Board of Governors meetings as well as reports submitted to the Board of Governors by the Tower Club undergraduate officers. Also included are correspondence and related material on the Club which deals with the role of the Princeton Prospect Foundation, tax exemption, and general Club obligations, as well as address and telephone lists of the Board of Governors.
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Series 3: Reports on Eating Clubs, 1940-1979, contains reports dealing with the Eating Clubs as a unit, not individually. They reflect both the positive and negative aspects of the Eating Clubs as seen by each author. These reports mainly focus on undergraduate life and the role of the Eating Clubs.
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Series 4: Graduate Inter-Club Council, 1940-1988, consists of correspondence and related material concerning James Newman, who was chairman of the Graduate Inter-Club Council, and the role of the Eating Clubs in general. Also included are the minutes of the Graduate Inter-Club Council meetings, along with address and telephone lists of the members of the Graduate Inter-Club Council.
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Series 1: Academics, 1927-1999 29 boxes 1 digital file

SOME ONLINE CONTENT
The Academic series contains audiovisual materials pertaining to class lectures, presentations, and field studies. The Lectures and Interviews series contain public addresses, lectures, and debates.