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Box xii, Packet 39-2
Second Camp Two Miles beyond Byrd's Tavern. 2-5 July 1782. Eight miles from the previous camp. Byrd's (frequently written "Bird's") Tavern was earlier known as Doncastle's Ordinary and was situated about 2 miles south of present Barhamsville. Since the French camped 2 miles beyond the tavern (which is not shown on the map), this would seem to place their camp at Barhamsville. The road branching off to the ight, not taken by the army, led to Ruffin's Ferry, which crossed the Pamunkey above West Point.
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Box xii, Packet 39-3
Third Camp at Ratcliffe House. Seven miles from Byrd's Tavern (i.e., 5 miles from the previous camp, which was 2 miles beyond the tavern). The much corrected word "Rattelaffe" appears to be a copying error for "Ratcliffe." There was evidently some uncertainty about the correct form. Verger in his journal writes it as "Radelassen." It has been variously transcribed in printed versions of other French officers' journals: e.g., "Ratelof" (Blanchard) and "Ratilisse" (Vicomte de Rochambeau).
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Box xii, Packet 39-4
Fourth Camp at Hartfield. 4-7 July 1782. Seven and one half miles from the previous camp. The name "Hartfield," which should presumably read "Harfield," has disappeared from modern maps. A Micheal Harfield appears in the New Kent County Tax List for 1782 (Virginia State Library), and Harfields are also mentions in the Vestry Book of St. Peter's Parish, part of which coincided with the western part of this county. Itinerary 6 describes the position near "Hartfield House" (the building shown here on a small round hillock) as a very poor campsite. It was located some 3 miles northwest of New Kent Courthouse (through which the army had marches on its way here), alond the old road to New Castle. The creek flowing into the Pamunkey, shown here on the map, is perhaps Big Creek or White House Creek. Cf. U.S. Geological Survey, Tunstall Qadrangle. The site of "The White House" home of Martha Dandridge Custis at the time of her marriage to George Washington, is in this general region, as is the Pamunkey Indian Reservation across the river.
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Box xii, Packet 39-5
Fifth Camp at New Castle. 5-9 July 1782. Fifteen miles from the precious camp. There was an extra day's here for each of the divisions, so that two divisions were encamped here together on 6, 7, and 8 July, the Fourth Division only of the 9th. Itinerary 6, describing the wagon train's 1781 march, speaks of New Castle as "a small town with very few houses, situarted on high ground. It is almost deserted. There are many plantations in the neighborhood." More than a half century later, when Benson J. Lossing visited it in December 1848, he described it as "once a flourishing village, but now a desolation, only one house remaining upon its site" ( Pictorial Field-Book of the Revolution [New York, 1851], II, 225). With the decline of river traffic and the changing pattern of agricultural economy in this section of Virginia, New Castle has now wholly disappeared. It was situated a mile of so east of the present bridge over the Pamunky on the Richmond-Tappahanock road (U.S. Route 360), where a state historical marker recals Patrick Henry's "call to arms" at New Castle.
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Box xii, Packet 39-6
Sixth Camp at Hanovertown. 7-10 July 1782. Seven miles from the previous camp. Hanovertown (not to be confused with Hanover Courthouse, which was some 10 miles beyond to the northwest) has, like New Castle, disappeared from modern maps. The French camp was a mile beyond the little town shown here, which had been laid out by vote of the Virginia Assembly in 1762 near Page's Warehouse. The small stream on the map is a tributary of the Pamunkey. The wagon train had camped here on 4 October 1781; see Itinerary 6, where it is recorded that Hanovertown and vicinity had suffered considerable damage from Cornwallis's raiders.
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Box xii, Packet 39-7
Seventh Camp at [Little] Page's Bridge or Graham's House. 8-10 July 1782. Ten miles from the previous camp. Littlepage's Bridge crossed the Pamunkey in the vicinity of Hanover Courthouse (not shown on the map). Graham's House was a mile of so beyond the river on the road (roughly present U.S. Route 301) leading north to Bowling Green. Itinerary 6 notes that the crossing of the Pamunkey was by a "wooden bridge." It was here at Littlepage's Bridge that the route of march of Lauzun's Legion (which had come from Petersburg and Richmond) joined that of the rest of the army. From here on the Legion formed the vanguard.
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Box xii, Packet 39-8
Eighth camp ar Burk's Bridge or Kenner's Tavern. 9-12 July 1782. Twelve miles from the previous camp. Burk's Bridge, which crossed the Mattaponi some 9 mile south of Bowling Green, was in Caroline County along present U.S. Route 301. John Burk was licensed as a tavernkeeper there. Although the wagon train did not camp at Burk's Bridge in 1781, the Itinerary describing its route notes that "a camp could be located in front of Burk's Brudge." "Kenner's Tavern" (the building to the left of the letter "k") is called "Kenner's Red House" on Colles's 1789 road map (Plate 72); the Itinerary (1781) refers to it only as "the red house."
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Box xii, Packet 39-9
Ninth Camp at Bowling Green. 10-13 July 1782. Nine miles from the precious camp. Rochambeau's aide-de-camp Von Closen, who joined his regiment (Royal Deux-Ponts) here on 11 July, describes Bowling Green as "a small place where there is only one tavern and the residence of Mr. John Hoomes, a very wealthy person, where we danced in the evening" (p. 210). The road branching off to the right, as indicated on the map, led to Caroline Courthouse, which was some distance from the settlement at Bowling Green proper. A few years later the county seat was moved to Bowling Green, where the present county courthouse was erected on land provided for public use by John Hoomes. The wagon train had made its 10th camp here on 2 October 1781. See Itinerary 6, where it is noted: "Neither camp nor headquarters would be very well situated here. It is nevertheless better than any other campsite in this neighborhood."
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Box xii, Packet 39-10
Tenth Camp at Charles Thornton's House. 11-14 July 1782. Eight and one half miles from the previous camp. The camp was on high ground beyond Charles Thornton's house on the road leading north to Fredericksburg and Falmouth. Some 2 miles beyond the campsite, but not shown on the map, was Todd's Ordinary (present Villboro, Caroline Country) where, according to Von Closen (p. 210), the headquarters was located. "Charles" Thornton's house was evidently so designated in order to distinguish it from "Widow" Thornton's, another "Fine house," 2 miles or so to the south and past which the army had marched on its way to its camp. Both Thornton houses are mentioned in the Itinerary (6) of the wagon train and are shown in Colles's Survey, Plates 70-71. When proceeding southward the wagon train had stopped to the east of the present route, at Colonel Dangerfield's plantation on the banks of the Rappahannock, as described in a fragment of Berthier's journal, Itinerary 6, n. 33.
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Box xii, Packet 39-11
Eleventh Camp at Falmouth. 12-16 July 1782. Fourteen miles from the precious camp. There was a "sejour," or extra day's rest here for each of the four divisions, so that two were in camp at the same time, as shown. The officers took advantage of the halt to make excursions in the vicinity. Clermont-Crèvecœur (p. 73)mentions a call on General Washington's mother in Fredericksburg (on the south bank of the Rappahannock, opposite Falmouth). Von Closen (pp. 210-211) speaks of visits to William Fitzhugh's house (Chatham) and to General Alexander Spotswood's estate at New Post. Blanchard ([1], p. 110) states that he set up and left at Falmouth a temporary hospital for 60 sick, who were later brought to Baltimore.