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File
Not all of these are children's catalogs: many are general catalogs with a section for children's books (page numbers indicated in the record); no children's books listed in the Winter Piper, 1932 or Spring Books, 1936. The children's catalogs all carry small black and white illustrations, while the general catalogs are unillustrated, even in the children's book sections. Several of the issues include order forms and business reply envelopes.
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Box 3, Folder 1
Books for Boys and Girls, 1936 and 1937 issues; Nelson Junior Books, 1949-1950 (price changes and other markings in red pencil). Illustrations for 1936 issue are blue-line; otherwise illustrations are black and white. 1936 issue has a few books for parents and teachers; 1937 issue features photographs of the authors and illustrators on pg. 18-19; 1949-1950 issue has Adult Books on pg. 33-36 and Bibles on pg. 37-39.
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Catalogs appear in a range of sizes and shapes, from the 16mo of 1936 to the narrow quarto of 1943. All are illustrated to some degree, many in color-line; note the full-color centerfolds for Disney's Pinocchio in the 1936 issue and the Babar books in the 1937 and 1938 issues.
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Box 3, Folder 13
For the Children, [1930]; Complete Catalogue of Publications, 1950-1951 (Juvenile Literature, pg. 8-20). 1930 issue includes a description and green-line illustration for nearly every title and a section of "Choice New Books," pg. 9-12; with a short manifesto on children's book illustration, pg. 2. Though the 1950-1951 issue is a general catalog, more than half of it is dedicated to juvenile books. The Beatrix Potter section includes a Peter Rabbit board game (pg. 17) and foreign language editions (pg. 18).
Folder
Contains books shelved on Wall 1, i.e. the wall through which one enters the Studio. It includes a run of Anglophone literature in approximate alphabetical order (running from The Oxford Book of English Verse (1.6.1.1) and Paul Auster (1.6.1.2) to Israel Zangwill (1.6.5.28) and a little beyond to photocopied material on Shakespeare and Coleridge (1.6.6.1).
Folder
Contains books shelved by Derrida in his Studio, an addition to the house that served as Derrida's principal work environment from the time it was built in 2001 up to his death in 2004. Books are represented here as inventoried in 2011. Also includes books not inventoried in 2011 (hence presumably not shelved in the Studio at the time) but located in the Studio at the time of packing the Library for shipment to Princeton University Library.
Folder
Contains the majority of books that were received as gifts by the Derrida household, many of them inscribed by the authors, as well as two sections of works by and about Derrida. Other items seem to have been inserted in the run because of their topical relationship with surrounding gift items. Some smaller sections may represent convenience shelving.
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Living Room and Attic, 1793-2013

390 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
Includes items not captured in the inventory but retrieved at the time of packing the Library for shipment to Princeton University Library. Items originate from the living room and attic, respectively, though which item came from which room is no longer known. A wide field of reading interests are represented in this series that may in part represent leisure reading in the Derrida household, including fiction and poetry, exhibit and museum catalogs, a small number of children's books, a variety of serial issues, as well as books relating to Judaism, Mythology, Religion, Literary Criticism, Psychology, World History, Literary History, Political Theory, the University, Architecture, Travel, Art, and others.
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House, 1793-2013

675 boxes
SOME ONLINE CONTENT
Contains books shelved by Derrida outside the Studio, i.e. in the main house. This includes a main run of largely books received as unsolicited gifts by Jacques and Marguerite as well as, in some instances, Jean, and Pierre, as well as the family's leisure reading and books not considered as central to Derrida's daily work as those shelved in the Studio.