Contents and Arrangement Expanded View

Collection Overview

Creator:
American Association for the Advancement of the Humanities
Collector:
Princeton University. Library. Special Collections
Title:
American Association for the Advancement of the Humanities Records
Repository:
Public Policy Papers
Permanent URL:
http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/vx021f13b
Dates:
1977-1985
Size:
16 boxes
Storage Note:
Mudd Manuscript Library (mudd): Box 1-16
Language:
English

Abstract

The American Association for the Advancement of the Humanities (AAAH) operated from 1979 until 1982. The AAAH was a general membership organization which supported the humanities in the United States through its involved in legislation, conferences, and producing the monthly publication Humanities Report. The AAAH's records document the administration of the association and include correspondence, board minutes, financial records, and materials on Humanities Report.

Collection Description & Creator Information

Description:

The AAAH's records document the administration of the association and include correspondence, board minutes, financial records, and materials on Humanities Report. The records focus on fundraising and the membership of the association, and also include materials related to projects undertaken by the AAAH. Many of the records document the work of the AAAH's chairman, James M. Banner, Jr.

Please see the series descriptions in the contents list for additional information about individual series.

Collection Creator Biography:

The American Association for the Advancement of the Humanities (AAAH) operated from 1979 until 1982. The AAAH was a general membership organization which supported the humanities in the United States through its involved in legislation, conferences, and producing the monthly publication Humanities Report. The AAAH was incorporated in October 1977 by James M. Banner, Jr. and Theodore K. Raab of Princeton University and opened its office in Washington, D.C. in January of 1979. It initially received funding from the Rockefeller, Ford, and Exxon Education foundations and the Carnegie Corporation of New York, and later from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, ATT, and the Dyson-Kissner-Moran Corporation.

The AAAH was founded to provide a general, independent membership organization to represent all aspects of the humanities in the United States, not just the scholarly community. It focused on three general areas: to support the work of humanists and foster communication and cooperation between them, to promote public understanding of the humanities, and to increase the contribution of the humanities in American life. It was governed by a 15 member Board of Directors composed of individuals involved in the humanities and related fields in the broadest sense, including schools, libraries, and the legal and medical professions. Five board members were elected each year by the membership. Board meetings were held twice a year, with an annual meeting open to both members and non-members.

The AAAH's activities included testifying before Congress, aiding in the founding of the National Humanities Alliance (a lobbying organization for the humanities) and the Community College Humanities Association, participating in a study with the Association of Research Libraries of the distribution of information about library developments to scholars at research universities, investigating the feasibility of creating a business committee for the humanities, and speaking for the broad interests of humanities at specialized humanities organizations. It also produced a monthly newsmagazine, Humanities Report, which was the only independent news source in the United States on the humanities. Humanities Report contained general news on issues, programs, activities, and developments in the humanities, as well as interviews, editorials, letters, and association news. It was distributed to all members of the AAAH. All of the AAAH's activities were handled by four full-time staff members, with James M. Banner, Jr. as chairman, supported by part-time assistants, project directors, and volunteers.

Soon after its inception, the AAAH reached its peak of 3,500 members. However, the association soon encountered difficulties. As an area with a great deal of specialization, many in the humanities did not see the need for this type of organization. It also encountered resistance from scholars who would have preferred it to be a more academic organization, rather than including a broader base of membership. Due to an economic downturn, individuals had less money to spend on dues, young scholars were facing unemployment, and the foundations which were supporting it also faced budget difficulties. By 1982, the membership had declined to close to 2,500. Unable to support itself financially from membership dues, and with insufficient support from the humanities community, the Board of Directors, with the agreement of chairman James M. Banner, Jr., decided to close the AAAH in the spring of 1982.

Collection History

Acquisition:

This collection was received in several shipments from James M. Banner, Jr. from 1984-1990, and formally donated to Princeton University in March 1993.

Archival Appraisal Information:

Materials separated from this collection include duplicate materials and a partial list of the addresses of members and subscribers to Humanities Report.

Processing Information:

This collection was processed by Adriane Hanson and Sumit Mehta in 2008. Finding aid written by Adriane Hanson in May 2008.

Access & Use

Access Restrictions:

The collection is open for research use.

Conditions for Reproduction and Use:

Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. For quotations that are fair use as defined under U. S. Copyright Law, no permission to cite or publish is required. For those few instances beyond fair use, any copyright vested in the donor has passed to Princeton University and researchers are free to move forward with use of materials without anything further from Mudd Library. For materials not created by the donor, where the copyright is not held by the University, researchers are responsible for determining who may hold the copyright and obtaining approval from them. In these instances, researchers do not need anything further from the Mudd Library to move forward with their use. If you have a question about who owns the copyright for an item, you may request clarification by contacting us through the Ask Us! form.

Special Requirements for Access:

Ten audiocassette tapes are located in Boxes 8 and 9. Access to this material follows the Mudd Manuscript Library policy for preservation and access to audiovisual materials.

Credit this material:

American Association for the Advancement of the Humanities Records; Public Policy Papers, Department of Special Collections, Princeton University Library

Permanent URL:
http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/vx021f13b
Location:
Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library
65 Olden Street
Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
(609) 258-6345

Find More

Related Material:

A collection at the Mudd Manuscript Library of particular relevance to the American Association for the Advancement of the Humanities is the Council of the Humanities Records.

Publication Note:

The following sources were consulted during preparation of the organizational history note: "Fact Sheet" by the American Association for the Advancement of the Humanities, February 1982; American Association for the Advancement of the Humanities Records, Box 7, Folder 5; Public Policy Papers, Special Collections, Princeton University Library. "Organizing the Humanities: AAAH's Vision Ten Years Later," by James M. Banner, Jr. Change , March/April 1989, p. 45-51.

Subject Terms:
Humanities -- Government policy -- United States.
Humanities -- United States.
Nonprofit organizations -- United States.
Genre Terms:
Administrative records.
Correspondence.
Minutes.
Names:
American Association for the Advancement of the Humanities
Humanities Report
Banner, James M., 1935-