Contents and Arrangement Expanded View

Collection Overview

Creator:
Morgan, Frederick, 1922-2004
Title:
Hudson Review Archives
Repository:
Manuscripts Division
Permanent URL:
http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/8p58pc97t
Dates:
1863-2016 (mostly 1947-2014)
Size:
542 boxes and 2 items
Storage Note:
This is stored in multiple locations. Firestone Library (mss): Boxes 1-135; 218-237; 277-395; 432-445; 464-477; B-001917; 279A; 377A; 381A; 384A; 384B; 384C; 388A; 445A ReCAP (rcpxm): Boxes 136-208; 238-276; 396-431; 446-463; 479-532; 431A; 449A Firestone Library (hsvm): Box 209-217
Language:
English

Abstract

Consists of the records of The Hudson Review, one of the most notable and influential American literary quarterlies of the post-World War II era. Reflecting the history of this New York City-based magazine, the bulk of material dates from 1947 to 2014. In addition, there are extensive personal and family papers of founding editor Frederick Morgan (1922-2004), who was also a published poet and translator.

Collection Description & Creator Information

Description:

These archives contain the records of The Hudson Review, one of the most notable and influential American literary quarterlies of the post-World War II era. Reflecting the history of this New York City-based magazine, the bulk of material dates from 1947 to 2014. In addition, these archives contain the personal papers of founding editor Frederick Morgan (1922-2004), who was also a published poet and translator. Files include author correspondence, manuscripts, various items reflecting the editing and production of the magazine (proofs, galleys, advertising and publicity materials, internal editorial memos), and items related to the Bennett Award, a literary prize honoring HR founding editor Joseph Bennett (1922-1972) that was awarded bi-annually from 1976 to 1994. A special grouping of material (correspondence, typescripts, proofs, printing plates) related to the modernist poet and critic Ezra Pound and his association with The Hudson Review is also included. Frederick Morgan's personal papers contain correspondence with his friends and family, drafts and manuscripts of his writings, his personal journals and diaries, files related to his time as a student, and photographs. Among the numerous prominent authors, critics, intellectuals, and translators published by The Hudson Review and represented in the files are Saul Bellow, Isaiah Berlin, Yves Bonnefoy, Kenneth Burke, Hayden Carruth, E. M. Cioren, T. S. Eliot, Robert Fitzgerald, Northrop Frye, Wyndham Lewis, Robert Lowell, Hugh MacDiarmid, Thomas Mann, Marianne Moore, Saint-John Perse, Sylvia Plath, Theodore Roethke, Anne Sexton, Allen Tate, William Carlos Williams, and Yvor Winters.

The archives for the years 2006 to 2014, which were received as a later addition, include author files and correspondence, issue files, financial and administrative documents, circulation and publicity materials, as well as files regarding two Hudson Review anthologies, Writes of Passage (2008) and Poets Translate Poets (2013); its Writers in the Schools program, which began in the mid 1990s; and correspondence, printed materials, and objects related to the life and work of Frederick Morgan.

Arrangement

The collection is organized into thirteen series.

Collection Creator Biography:

Morgan, Frederick, 1922-2004

The Hudson Review was co-founded in 1947 by Princeton graduates Frederick Morgan '43, Joseph Bennett '43, and William Arrowsmith '45. Its first issue appeared in the spring of 1948 and included an essay by R. P. Blackmur and poetry by Wallace Stevens and E. E. Cummings. After William Arrowsmith left the magazine around 1960, and Joseph Bennett gave up his editorial activities in 1966, Frederick Morgan continued on as editor until his retirement in 1998. Paula Deitz, who joined The Hudson Review as an assistant editor in 1967, shared editing responsibilities with Morgan (they were married in 1969) until 1998 when she assumed editorship of the magazine. An influential quarterly that describes itself as a "magazine of literature and the arts," The Hudson Review has published some the most eminent writers and critics of the twentieth century. In addition to its substantial record publishing in the fields of poetry, fiction, and literary criticism, The Hudson Review has published across a wide range of genres and subject areas including philosophy, cultural anthropology, travel writing, art and design criticism, memoir, the cultural essay, and music, film, theater, and dance reviewing. At the time of the writing of this finding aid, The Hudson Review is still in operation and continues to publish on a quarterly basis.

Biography of Frederick Morgan

Poet, critic, translator, and editor, [George] Frederick Morgan (1922-2004) was born in New York City on April 25, 1922. He received his education at St. Bernard's School, New York City, St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hampshire, and Princeton University, from which he graduated in 1943. While studying comparative literature at Princeton, Morgan was co-editor of the Nassau Literary Review (also known as the Nassau Lit, and took creative writing classes with Allen Tate and R. P. Blackmur. Tate, in particular, would remain an influential figure in Morgan's artistic and intellectual life after Princeton. From 1943 to 1945 Morgan served in the Tank Destroyer Corps, U.S. Army, and was stationed mainly at Fort Hood, Texas. In 1947 he co-founded The Hudson Review, and continued to serve as editor of the magazine for fifty years, retiring in the spring of 1998. His first book of poetry, A Book of Change, was published in 1972 (Morgan was fifty years old) and received a National Book Award nomination. His last collection, The One Abiding, was published in 2003. He also edited two anthologies of work originally published in The Hudson Review, and his poetry and translations appeared in numerous magazines and literary periodicals. Morgan was married three times—to Constance Canfield, Rose Fillmore, and Paula Deitz—and had six children, all from his first marriage. In 1985 Morgan was made "Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres" by the French government, and in 2001 he was awarded the Aiken Taylor Award in Modern American Poetry. Frederick Morgan died on February 20, 2004.

Bibliography of Frederick Morgan


Morgan, Frederick, 1922-2004

The Hudson Review was co-founded in 1947 by Princeton graduates Frederick Morgan '43, Joseph Bennett '43, and William Arrowsmith '45. Its first issue appeared in the spring of 1948 and included an essay by R. P. Blackmur and poetry by Wallace Stevens and E. E. Cummings. After William Arrowsmith left the magazine around 1960, and Joseph Bennett gave up his editorial activities in 1966, Frederick Morgan continued on as editor until his retirement in 1998. Paula Deitz, who joined The Hudson Review as an assistant editor in 1967, shared editing responsibilities with Morgan (they were married in 1969) until 1998 when she assumed editorship of the magazine. An influential quarterly that describes itself as a "magazine of literature and the arts," The Hudson Review has published some the most eminent writers and critics of the twentieth century. In addition to its substantial record publishing in the fields of poetry, fiction, and literary criticism, The Hudson Review has published across a wide range of genres and subject areas including philosophy, cultural anthropology, travel writing, art and design criticism, memoir, the cultural essay, and music, film, theater, and dance reviewing. At the time of the writing of this finding aid, The Hudson Review is still in operation and continues to publish on a quarterly basis.

Biography of Frederick Morgan

Poet, critic, translator, and editor, [George] Frederick Morgan (1922-2004) was born in New York City on April 25, 1922. He received his education at St. Bernard's School, New York City, St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hampshire, and Princeton University, from which he graduated in 1943. While studying comparative literature at Princeton, Morgan was co-editor of the Nassau Literary Review (also known as the Nassau Lit, and took creative writing classes with Allen Tate and R. P. Blackmur. Tate, in particular, would remain an influential figure in Morgan's artistic and intellectual life after Princeton. From 1943 to 1945 Morgan served in the Tank Destroyer Corps, U.S. Army, and was stationed mainly at Fort Hood, Texas. In 1947 he co-founded The Hudson Review, and continued to serve as editor of the magazine for fifty years, retiring in the spring of 1998. His first book of poetry, A Book of Change, was published in 1972 (Morgan was fifty years old) and received a National Book Award nomination. His last collection, The One Abiding, was published in 2003. He also edited two anthologies of work originally published in The Hudson Review, and his poetry and translations appeared in numerous magazines and literary periodicals. Morgan was married three times—to Constance Canfield, Rose Fillmore, and Paula Deitz—and had six children, all from his first marriage. In 1985 Morgan was made "Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres" by the French government, and in 2001 he was awarded the Aiken Taylor Award in Modern American Poetry. Frederick Morgan died on February 20, 2004.

Bibliography of Frederick Morgan

Collection History

Acquisition:

The Hudson Review Archives and Frederick Morgan Papers were purchased in March 2006 , partly with funds from the Richard M. Ludwig Endowment donated by Michael Spence. The Morgan family papers were the gift of Ms. Paula Deitz, 2006 . The magazine's archives spanning the years 2006 to 2014 were purchased from Paula Deitz in 2015 (AM 2015-76). Hudson Review single issues are accrued periodically.

Appraisal

No materials were separated from the collection during 2015 processing.

Processing Information

This collection was processed by Brian McDonald in 2006-2007. Finding aid written by Brian McDonald in 2007. The folder inventory for the 2015 accession was added by Fiona Bell '18 and Kristine Gift (GS) in May 2015, and the finding aid was updated by Kelly Bolding in May 2015.

Access & Use

Conditions Governing Access

Open for research.

Conditions Governing Use

Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. No further photoduplication of copies of material in the collection can be made when Princeton University Library does not own the original. Inquiries regarding publishing material from the collection should be directed to RBSC Public Services staff through the Ask Us! form. The library has no information on the status of literary rights in the collection and researchers are responsible for determining any questions of copyright.

Credit this material:

Hudson Review Archives; Manuscripts Division, Department of Special Collections, Princeton University Library

Permanent URL:
http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/8p58pc97t
Location:
Firestone Library
One Washington Road
Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
(609) 258-3184
Storage Note:
This is stored in multiple locations. Firestone Library (mss): Boxes 1-135; 218-237; 277-395; 432-445; 464-477; B-001917; 279A; 377A; 381A; 384A; 384B; 384C; 388A; 445A ReCAP (rcpxm): Boxes 136-208; 238-276; 396-431; 446-463; 479-532; 431A; 449A Firestone Library (hsvm): Box 209-217